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Thread: Italian Mandolin music being forgotten ???

  1. #51
    Registered User DavidKOS's Avatar
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    Default Re: Italian Mandolin music being forgotten ???

    Quote Originally Posted by SincereCorgi View Post
    It's funny how the bay area has such big ancestral Italian and Portuguese communities but relatively little interest in Italian mandolin or fado music.
    I can't speak for the Portuguese, but if you look at Italian musical history in America, the 2nd generation and on were very active in American popular music. From top singer to rank-and-file band musicians, many were Italian American. Some, like Louis Prima, used some traditional material as a basis for some songs, some like Dean Martin and others recorded music that was sentimental-Italian...but not a lot kept playing the old-world music.

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    Default Re: Italian Mandolin music being forgotten ???

    I haven't forgotten Italian mandolin music - I've been working on some of Calace's music for awhile (and will probably be working on it for awhile longer to get it correct! LOL!)

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    Default Re: Italian Mandolin music being forgotten ???

    I have a part time job as a gondolier. Real authentic Venetian gondolas from Italy. Sometimes we have live musicians on board - usually accordion or violin, but this year I started playing tunes on my mandolin for the passengers on trips as well (when I'm not rowing). After many years behind the oar with a musician on board - all the popular Italian folk songs were stuck in my head, so getting them down on the mandolin wasn't such a difficult process.

    Everybody wants to hear O Sole Mio, Santa Lucia, Torna Sorrento. When the moon hits your eye....

    Little do the lovebirds on board know that they are also being serenaded by Bill Monroe, new grass, Bach and old time too. I've got a couple Italian Mandolin books I have learned a couple tunes from too, but there's definitely lots more to learn!

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  6. #54

    Default Re: Italian Mandolin music being forgotten ???

    David,
    Thanks for the music, I will try to learn how to play it.

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  8. #55

    Default Re: Italian Mandolin music being forgotten ???

    Interesting thread. In November the Munier Mandolin & Guitar Orchestra hosted an en masse orchestra (65 players from across the Northeat). The program consisted entirely of music by Italian film scorers Ennio Morricone and Nino Rota. The second half of the program featured the Carlo Aonzo Trio. it was a lot of fun. here are some excerpts.


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  10. #56

    Default Re: Italian Mandolin music being forgotten ???

    My Pop played mandolin in the Munier Mandolin & Guitar Orchestra for some 40 years, thanks for the video I was unable to attend this concert & it looks like I missed a great program.
    You can check out his video that I posted.

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  12. #57
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    Default Re: Italian Mandolin music being forgotten ???

    Quote Originally Posted by chuckhorton View Post
    I have a part time job as a gondolier. Real authentic Venetian gondolas from Italy. Sometimes we have live musicians on board - usually accordion or violin, but this year I started playing tunes on my mandolin for the passengers on trips as well (when I'm not rowing). After many years behind the oar with a musician on board - all the popular Italian folk songs were stuck in my head, so getting them down on the mandolin wasn't such a difficult process.

    Everybody wants to hear O Sole Mio, Santa Lucia, Torna Sorrento. When the moon hits your eye....

    Little do the lovebirds on board know that they are also being serenaded by Bill Monroe, new grass, Bach and old time too. I've got a couple Italian Mandolin books I have learned a couple tunes from too, but there's definitely lots more to learn!
    Y'know, I've been thinking about a part time job as a gondolier - doesn't everybody? I'm intrigued ... is this on the Mystic River?
    Collings MT O
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    Default Re: Italian Mandolin music being forgotten ???

    Liuqin陳子涵 Chen Zi Han

    Donít know how to embed , but if you check out this Taiwanese womanís renditions of Italian faves on Youtube, playing a liuquin, I guarantee youíll be impressed.

    Bill

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    Default Re: Italian Mandolin music being forgotten ???

    Bit of news for those interested in Italian classical mandolin. We see quite a lot of activity but some of it is not particularly newsworthy in respect to it being something brand new or of importance that it merits mention.

    The largest single Italian mandolin event we know of just wrapped up: International Italian Mandolin and Guitar Winter Academy in Sorrento. It's a pretty big crowd they attract with outstanding talent as instructors. The summer version of the same event is held in Genoa.

    NAR International, a recording and publishing house in Italy that serves the Italian indie market just re-released an important recording originally from 2002 we think is very special and has apparently been out of print for some time near as we can tell. Serenata veneziana with mandolin features Ugo Orlandi, Alessandro Bono, Maura Mazzonetto and Sergio Zigiotti is now available on amazon in the U.S. and amazon European and UK.

    Serenata veneziana with mandolin

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  17. #60

    Default Re: Italian Mandolin music being forgotten ???

    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Foss View Post
    There's lots of singing with mandolin backup. The mandolinists take over at 15:48

    https://youtu.be/QG7BSaAyN_c

    A musical stroll in Naples:

    https://youtu.be/k3RbY8aeuoY
    Thanks for both of these! Frankly, I like that jam better when the singer is running the show - she has a lot of spirit!

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    Default Re: Italian Mandolin music being forgotten ???

    Hey! Where can I get one of those bass tambourines?

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    Default Re: Italian Mandolin music being forgotten ???

    It's Luigi Embergher's birthday. Let's get the party started. Gonna be a lotta candles. Super Bowl party brings on an entirely different meaning. So many puns. So little time.


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    Default Re: Italian Mandolin music being forgotten ???

    Quote Originally Posted by Mandolin Cafe View Post
    ...... So many puns. So little time.
    Apparently, Luigi was particularly adept at the "Ave Maria" pass.

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    Default Re: Italian Mandolin music being forgotten ???

    Happy Birthday, Luigi!
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    Default Re: Italian Mandolin music being forgotten ???

    Looks tasty, Jim. Did you bake that?

    Served with Neapolitan ice cream, of course.

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    Default Re: Italian Mandolin music being forgotten ???

    Actually it looks like the strings on the cake-o-lin are linguini. Definitely a Roman mandolin, tho. You can tell by the arched fretboard.
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    Default Re: Italian Mandolin music being forgotten ???

    Wow that Carlo Aonzo was a blast! Thank you Jim.

  29. #68
    Sheri Mignano Crawford Mandophile's Avatar
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    Default Re: Italian Mandolin music being forgotten ???

    I recently played with Mike Guggino when he visited Petaluma in late summer last year. He's my 'guggino' the Sicilian word for cousin. A Sicilian cousin and probably somewhere in my K14a DNA!!!! LOL! Seriously, he is a competent mandolinist who roams the range. While he plays the bluegrass-oriented stuff, his heart and passion remain with the Italian repertoire. It may appear as though it comes naturally to him but let's be honest, what we hear as natural is a lifetime devoted to study, practice, and striving toward perfection. His models, the examples that inspired, his dedication to executing a reliable tremolo and his musical execution of classical details (triplets, syncopation, cadenza runs) shaped his versatile repertoire.
    It can not be said too often that to play the so-called folk music requires training in the classical. That is not to say that you must be classically trained but it sure does help. I'm reminded that some of the ballo liscio dances can appear deceptively simple. However, if you're not able to shift positions, relax the wrist--yet keep it in control, and if you think you can read the notes and make music. Well, I have a rude awakening for you. You can't.
    The original question asked by Shayan is a legitimate inquiry into who has earned the 'right' or 'privilege' to render the Italian classics or for that matter, Greek, Rumanian, French, Brazilian etc etc. What difference should it make whether an Italian, an Italian American, or a Jew, or a Christian or a non-Christian plays the music? (rhetorical question here). What makes the difference is the personality of the individual. Each of us brings something special to the music we perform. My personality and characteristics derive from a lively Sicilian family tempered by a rational Scottish side to me. I consider it a beautiful blend but somehow when I'm into playing the music I love, I surrender to the Sicilian side. If I'm outside my 'domain' and I'm playing flute on an Etude from the Germanic Boehm tradition, I yield to that demand. If I'm engaged in French chanson or musette on accordion, I must adhere to the French musette composers as I make myself into "their own image." That may sound silly but that's how I see it. The Italian composers in the ballo liscio tradition (I've now researched more than 130) were immersed in the classical tradition, well-educated, well-trained, and devoted to the models (mainly the men they heard while growing up). I grew up listening to my teachers who were immersed in their teachers. The point here is that unless you are inspired by the highest standards, the musicians who were exemplars in their own music genre of sphere of influence, then, you probably should back off and leave it to others. While that may sound arrogant, I have no objections to anyone playing the music that I love. It's like a race horse at the track: they all want to win but only one does. Yes, a horse must qualify to even enter the race but the beauty of watching (listening) comes down to whether or not there is capital "B" Beauty in their rendering. A haphazard, sloppy rendition should never be allowed. Ever.
    Since this is a stream of consciousness response, I will say that I had no intention to bring in Plato here but I just did. There is an ideal expression in every music genre. Each ethnic musical division demands so much from each of us. I do my best to meet the challenge and hope that it will be appreciated. In today's world of quick, thoughtless and meaningless 'likes' and monetized inflated 'hits' on YouTube, we all think we are the cat's pajamas. We're deceptively drawn into believing that we're totally nailing it. For that reason, we must be cautious while we bring forth a new video or a new CD track. We have an obligation to honor the composer and the arrangers who possessed the skill to shape a musical dance into a thing of capital B Beauty. Let us respect the music by respecting the composer.
    I don't know that I replied directly to Shayan's question but I feel so much better now having vented.
    Last edited by Mandophile; Mar-27-2018 at 1:11pm.

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  31. #69
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    Default Re: Italian Mandolin music being forgotten ???

    Quote Originally Posted by Mandophile View Post
    I recently played with Mike Guggino when he visited Petaluma in late summer last year. He's my 'guggino' the Sicilian word for cousin. A Sicilian cousin and probably somewhere in my K14a DNA!!!! LOL!
    I'm not sure of the number but my Sicilian maternal DNA is strongest in the K range.

    Hmmmmm, ...my family sounded more like "kuggina" to my ear....K, D, dialect....

    Quote Originally Posted by Mandophile View Post

    his heart and passion remain with the Italian repertoire. It may appear as though it comes naturally to him but let's be honest, what we hear as natural is a lifetime devoted to study, practice, and striving toward perfection. His models, the examples that inspired, his dedication to executing a reliable tremolo and his musical execution of classical details (triplets, syncopation, cadenza runs) shaped his versatile repertoire.
    It can not be said too often that to play the so-called folk music requires training in the classical. That is not to say that you must be classically trained but it sure does help. I'm reminded that some of the ballo liscio dances can appear deceptively simple. However, if you're not able to shift positions, relax the wrist--yet keep it in control, and if you think you can read the notes and make music. Well, I have a rude awakening for you. You can't.


    ......What makes the difference is the personality of the individual. Each of us brings something special to the music we perform.
    ......The Italian composers in the ballo liscio tradition (I've now researched more than 130) were immersed in the classical tradition, well-educated, well-trained, and devoted to the models
    .......The point here is that unless you are inspired by the highest standards, the musicians who were exemplars in their own music genre of sphere of influence, then, you probably should back off and leave it to others.

    ....... In today's world of quick, thoughtless and meaningless 'likes' and monetized inflated 'hits' on YouTube, we all think we are the cat's pajamas. We're deceptively drawn into believing that we're totally nailing it. For that reason, we must be cautious while we bring forth a new video or a new CD track. We have an obligation to honor the composer and the arrangers who possessed the skill to shape a musical dance into a thing of capital B Beauty. Let us respect the music by respecting the composer.
    I don't know that I replied directly to Shayan's question but I feel so much better now having vented.
    Thank you for opinion.

    Italian mandolin = pretty close to classical mandolin

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    Sheri Mignano Crawford Mandophile's Avatar
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    Default Re: Italian Mandolin music being forgotten ???

    Yes, an opinion is just the beginning. I feel comfortable sharing them here. At the same time, I realize how it is so easy to misinterpret what is being said. I wouldn't want to be thought of as a snob or as if I own this particular music genre. However, I suppose that when one grows up with a certain type of music, it makes a huge difference in embedding it for a lifetime. It's a challenge to come to any music genre as a full adult and even harder to tackle it when the genre is not within your own upbringing. (that's an opinion to be discussed I'm sure)
    Still, I have faith in the younger generation who is learning the music from the early 1900s. I am encouraged by the young men and women who are studying it and making it their own. The cafes may be disappearing but we can all create our own circolo!

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    Default Re: Italian Mandolin music being forgotten ???

    Well, my newest CD is arriving tomorrow and it's all Italian music. I play twin mandolins in harmony and I play the rhythm guitar also. My friend Eddie Guthman plays upright bass. The CD is called "Echoes of the Silent Fountain" and it's a tribute to the music of Matteo Casserino and Gino DiMichele. Here's a link to my webpage on the recording: http://phillawrence.com/Echoes%20of%...0Fountain.html

    And it should be available to download on CDBaby and other online stores in a week or two, maybe sooner. Here's a link to CDBaby where you can hear samples; https://store.cdbaby.com/cd/phillawrence5

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  36. #72
    Sheri Mignano Crawford Mandophile's Avatar
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    Default Re: Italian Mandolin music being forgotten ???

    Not only is it a tribute to our dear, dear friends Matteo & Gino as renowned musicians but you honor and respect the composers and arrangers as well. You have created something with capital B beautiful that can be listened to for a lifetime. Because you were able to provide a preview copy to me, I have played along with each track. Everything is in the right key and 'tempo giusto.'

    How many poorly performed versions have I heard in my lifetime? Too many! The Silent Fountain original (cassette tape & LP) set the standard of perfection! I asked myself How could anyone improve on it? That was my initial response to hearing about what you were doing with Silent Fountain. Over the past decade or so Bruce Zweig helped with technical conversion to MP3s, Gus Garelick and his Frittatas contributed great CDs and his group benefited from Gus's arrangements of these classics, and of course, my own ensemble and "Mando Liscio" CD spent much in preparation and rehearsal for our recording at Caffe Trieste studios. But I know that you devoted several months recording, mixing, and perfecting this ensemble of parts.
    At first I was doubtful but you won me over. (I can be a stickler but then so are you!) While there are those who incorrectly consider the ballo liscio music genre lacking in complexity, those of us who've devoted a lifetime to it know better. As I've said in numerous posts at Mando Cafe, this music is on the cusp of classical, it deserves to be approached with much care, great attention to detail, and above all with mental concentration, artistic preparation and practice. These are not sight-reading exercises to be inflicted on unsuspecting listeners. These pieces are of such high caliber that a musician must consider how to properly render them.The Maestros exist but for those not lucky enough to learn directly from them, your CD establishes an improved standard. Each track inculcates the true meaning of the ballo liscio tradition. You have raised the cultural curtain and I wholeheartedly salute you on your efforts. Your "Echoes" CD is produced with not only technical expertise but unqualified musicality! Mille Grazie!
    P.S. this is not a paid endorsement! LOL

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  38. #73
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    Default Re: Italian Mandolin music being forgotten ???

    Quote Originally Posted by phillawrencemandolin View Post
    Well, my newest CD is arriving tomorrow and it's all Italian music. I play twin mandolins in harmony and I play the rhythm guitar also.
    I just purchased my copy, and I really like it.

    Did you use the archtop Gibson mandolin on some of the tracks? just curious about the tone color.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mandophile View Post
    . You have created something with capital B beautiful that can be listened to for a lifetime. your CD establishes an improved standard. Each track inculcates the true meaning of the ballo liscio tradition. You have raised the cultural curtain and I wholeheartedly salute you on your efforts. Your "Echoes" CD is produced with not only technical expertise but unqualified musicality! Mille Grazie!
    P.S. this is not a paid endorsement! LOL
    I agree, it's a worthy effort.

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    Default Re: Italian Mandolin music being forgotten ???

    I'm glad you brought up that point. I feel strongly (as asserted in other threads) that the Neapolitan bowlback is the ONLY way to play this music. Of course, that's not always possible but I would have preferred hearing these on an authentic musical instrument. These dances were written with that instrument in mind and NOT a Gibson or any other flatback. This is such a philosophical approach to music but I'd rather that than to slough off the issue of resonance and tremolo. A far, far better listening experience if Neapolitan bowlbacks are used. That's just me! BTW, I don't think Gus uses a Neapolitan at all, always a flatback and of course, Matteo used a flatback and so, too, Rudy! Oh Oh, I'm outnumbered!

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  41. #75
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    Default Re: Italian Mandolin music being forgotten ???

    Quote Originally Posted by Mandophile View Post
    I'm glad you brought up that point. I feel strongly (as asserted in other threads) that the Neapolitan bowlback is the ONLY way to play this music. Of course, that's not always possible but I would have preferred hearing these on an authentic musical instrument. These dances were written with that instrument in mind and NOT a Gibson or any other flatback. This is such a philosophical approach to music but I'd rather that than to slough off the issue of resonance and tremolo. A far, far better listening experience if Neapolitan bowlbacks are used. That's just me! BTW, I don't think Gus uses a Neapolitan at all, always a flatback and of course, Matteo used a flatback and so, too, Rudy! Oh Oh, I'm outnumbered!
    I use both bowlback and flatback mandolins - but all are short scale Italian style with light roundwound strings and played with a pointed pick.

    So many folks use modern mandolins that I can't complain - as many Italian guys in the USA used archtop mandolins - but my preference is for something that sounds more Italian.

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