Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 28

Thread: bits to cut inlays

  1. #1
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Lewisville, NC
    Posts
    175

    Default bits to cut inlays

    Good morning,
    I am looking for suggestions and sources for the tiny bits needed to cut peghead inlays with. I run a shopbot buddy, and have collets for 3/32 and 1/8 shanks.
    Thanks, Graham

  2. #2
    Moderator MikeEdgerton's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    40.191N -74.2W
    Posts
    22,786

    Default Re: bits to cut inlays

    "Bargain instruments are no bargains if you can't play them". These are the words of J. Garber.

  3. #3
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Lewisville, NC
    Posts
    175

    Default Re: bits to cut inlays

    Thanks Mike. Just ordered some.

  4. #4
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Lewisville, NC
    Posts
    175

    Default Re: bits to cut inlays

    I found some even smaller at Bits&Bits.
    Graham

  5. #5
    Registered User Jimmy Kittle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    West Michigan
    Posts
    141

    Default Re: bits to cut inlays

    I get .016" and .020" bits with 1/8" shanks from drillbits unlimited.
    Last edited by Jimmy Kittle; Oct-30-2017 at 10:42am. Reason: typing error

  6. #6
    Registered User amowry's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Bend, OR
    Posts
    1,924

    Default Re: bits to cut inlays

    I get all mine from Precisebits.com. Great selection and very helpful. There's tons of useful info on the site too, if you're new to this kind of thing. They have endmills down to 0.01", which can be useful for getting into tight spots, as long as you don't break them

  7. The following members say thank you to amowry for this post:


  8. #7
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Lewisville, NC
    Posts
    175

    Default Re: bits to cut inlays

    Thanks guys.

  9. #8
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Boise, Idaho
    Posts
    576

    Default Re: bits to cut inlays

    Quote Originally Posted by amowry View Post
    as long as you don't break them
    Lololol! There is some learning curve involved. Buy extras.

    +1 on Precisebits!

  10. #9
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    DeKalb, IL
    Posts
    3,446

    Default Re: bits to cut inlays

    Another thumbs up for Precisebits here. And for buying extras. You might want to consider the precision collets that they sell. They are really important if you're going to be cutting with the little tiny bits.

  11. #10

    Default Re: bits to cut inlays

    I use to cut with 12 thou bits (.3mm), got sick of them breaking, went 20 thou bits (.5mm) modified my files to suit and have not broken one since, average 40hrs of cutting per bit before they go too blunt.

    My point, just donít go too small, they break really easy at .3mm

    Steve

  12. #11
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Lewisville, NC
    Posts
    175

    Default Re: bits to cut inlays

    d
    Do any of you folks have a suggested speed to turn them? How slow do you cnc guys move the spindle when using these tiny bits?
    Thanks, Graham

  13. #12

    Default Re: bits to cut inlays

    I have a dedicated machine for cutting pearl and shell, pass depths .1mm a a time, spindle speed 10k

    Pics, bottom of this linked page

    http://www.mirwa.com.au/Our_Facility.html

  14. #13
    Registered User Steve Sorensen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Santa Clarita, CA
    Posts
    2,220

    Default Re: bits to cut inlays

    Precise Bits has a great table for speed settings for each size bit and type of material.

    Steve

  15. #14
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Lewisville, NC
    Posts
    175

    Default Re: bits to cut inlays

    Thanks again. Mirwa, that is one very impressive shop.
    Graham

  16. The following members say thank you to graham darden for this post:

    mirwa 

  17. #15
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Lewisville, NC
    Posts
    175

    Default Re: bits to cut inlays

    Steve. Just went through 100$ worth of bits in 2 days. Thought I had it fixed. Just looked at the chart. Thanks.

  18. #16
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Lewisville, NC
    Posts
    175

    Default Re: bits to cut inlays

    Thanks James

  19. #17

    Default Re: bits to cut inlays

    Ouch, that hurts, what width?

    Steve

  20. #18
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Lewisville, NC
    Posts
    175

    Default Re: bits to cut inlays

    .0156. 3 flute end mill. Precise Bits #MM318-0156-006F.

  21. #19

    Default Re: bits to cut inlays

    Quote Originally Posted by graham darden View Post
    .0156. 3 flute end mill. Precise Bits #MM318-0156-006F.
    Would you like advice on feeds and speeds? With a .015" end mill, I would be running at your max rpm, 24000-30000, and cutting 0.010" depth of cut at 10 inches a minute. That's overly conservative but should work on anyone's setup unless something is really wrong.

    Some things to help you keep from breaking cutters:

    Start .010" above your inlay and go .10" below your inlay.

    Fixture your part really rigidly. Super glue onto PCB board or something and then use acetone to separate, sometimes you can pop them off with a really sharp chisel

    Oil your collets and keep them in good condition. Runout will destroy cutters.

    Use good CAM to generate your paths.

    Unnecessarily conservative ramps can break cutters. Ramp in at the same speed you plan to cut, and at about a 10 degree angle.

    Zero your cutter accurately. Use a good quality tool setter or built-in probe if possible. If not, use a continuity mode on a volt meter and connect it to the cutter, then to a 1-2-3 block. That will get you very accurate (within the intrinsic error of your CNC setup) tool zero with minimal cost.

  22. #20
    Registered User Pete Braccio's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Now in the Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    1,020

    Default Re: bits to cut inlays

    And, one post by Marty shows how much I don’t know about any of this.

    I know what those words mean individually but not when they are put together in that order. :^ p
    Pete Braccio

    "The Rules: Play nice and don't run with scissors"
    http://www.braccio.me
    Check out my web site for:
    Jack Tottle music files
    BBC Virtual Session files
    O'Neill's PDFs
    ITM Tunebooks, and more

  23. The following members say thank you to Pete Braccio for this post:


  24. #21
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Lewisville, NC
    Posts
    175

    Default Re: bits to cut inlays

    Thanks Marty

  25. #22
    Registered User amowry's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Bend, OR
    Posts
    1,924

    Default Re: bits to cut inlays

    All great info from Marty, as always. The one thing I would add that I also do is slow down the acceleration on my machine when I'm cutting inlay (I think it's around 2"/s^2), so it's not jerking the end mill around too much. For zeroing my Z I use a 1/8" calibration blank on the phenolic backer, so I'm consistently cutting a bit into the backer, regardless of shell thickness.

    I plan on breaking at least one of those 0.0156" cutters when I'm cutting a batch of inlays for five or six instruments, because there's only so much stress those tiny cutters can handle. It hurts the pocketbook, but it sure beats sucking pearl dust for days on end

  26. #23

    Default Re: bits to cut inlays

    Quote Originally Posted by Marty Jacobson View Post
    Start .010" above your inlay and go .10" below your inlay.
    Typo. Start .010" above your inlay and go 0.010" below your inlay.

    Another important point is to surface the thing you're using to hold down your parts. A perfectly flat surface to place the inlay on will improve the accuracy of the resulting parts.
    It will also prevent broken cutters, since a non-level surface is likely to cause your bit to break.

    Quote Originally Posted by amowry View Post
    All great info from Marty, as always. The one thing I would add that I also do is slow down the acceleration on my machine when I'm cutting inlay (I think it's around 2"/s^2), so it's not jerking the end mill around too much.
    PreciseBits recommends 20in/s^2 for tiny bits in soft media. With shell, that 2"/s^2 is probably giving you some benefit, and the stuff is so small it's not really slowing anything down.

    The only thing I would warn about is if you set the accel too low on a stepper-driven machine running Mach3, you will actually end up not following the path, and it might be worse than keeping it at its recommended accel. With your fancy encoder-equipped machine, of course Andrew, you can get away with whatever accel setting you want. But there are still people out there running Mach3, so just wanted to say that slower is not always better.

  27. #24
    Registered User amowry's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Bend, OR
    Posts
    1,924

    Default Re: bits to cut inlays

    Quote Originally Posted by Marty Jacobson View Post

    The only thing I would warn about is if you set the accel too low on a stepper-driven machine running Mach3, you will actually end up not following the path, and it might be worse than keeping it at its recommended accel. With your fancy encoder-equipped machine, of course Andrew, you can get away with whatever accel setting you want. But there are still people out there running Mach3, so just wanted to say that slower is not always better.
    Ah, good to know. I didn't realize that was the case.

  28. #25
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Lewisville, NC
    Posts
    175

    Default Re: bits to cut inlays

    What does ^ represent?

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •