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Thread: The myth of a standing ovation

  1. #1
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    Default The myth of a standing ovation

    Well, this isn't mandolin specific but it was written by a mandolinist (does that count).

    Hope you enjoy.


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  3. #2
    Phil Goodson Philphool's Avatar
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    Default Re: The myth of a standing ovation

    How many times have I had those thoughts go through my head after attending a performance?

    But .... sometimes it's real.
    Phil

    “Sharps/Flats” “Accidentals”

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    Moderator MikeEdgerton's Avatar
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    Default Re: The myth of a standing ovation

    I usually get walking ovations.
    "Bargain instruments are no bargains if you can't play them". These are the words of J. Garber.

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  6. #4

    Default Re: The myth of a standing ovation

    Hopefully, this is tongue in cheek...if it's not then I'd give your audiences more credit...
    Northfield F5M #268, AT02 #7

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    Registered User Randi Gormley's Avatar
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    Default Re: The myth of a standing ovation

    Interesting enough, a standing ovation can be both -- appreciation and politeness. The one doesn't rule out the other. It could also mean someone needs to stand up after sitting for a long time. I always give the audience the benefit of the doubt!

    The poem does include a bit of acid though, of the woman "who believes what she wants." Lot of passive aggressive dislike or jealousy going on there!

    I love the illustrations. Very '20s/'30s.
    --------------------------------
    1920 Lyon & Healy bowlback
    1923 Gibson A-1 snakehead
    1952 Strad-o-lin
    1983 Giannini ABSM1 bandolim
    2009 Giannini GBSM3 bandolim
    2011 Eastman MD305

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    JL277z 

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    Some Ability - No Talent MikeZito's Avatar
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    Default Re: The myth of a standing ovation

    I once did a solo show at a county fair, just before a dance troop of 7-year old girls came on to perform. The audience during the last 10 minutes of my set was a small group of grandfathers who sat in the front row. After each song they just sat and looked right through me, with arms crossed and emotionless faces - like I didn't even exist . . . talk about a tough crowd! Needless to say, simple applause never even occurred to them - much less a 'polite standing ovation'. To make matters worse, not more than 50 feet from the stage, there was a tractor pull competition going on - so every 5 minutes, these monster tractors started revving their engines, and drowned out every sound for 100 yards around.

    You just cant make this stuff up . . . .

  10. #7
    Innocent Bystander JeffD's Avatar
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    Default Re: The myth of a standing ovation

    Very funny. I loved it.
    Indulge responsibly!

    The entire staff
    funny....

  11. #8
    Registered User Timbofood's Avatar
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    Default Re: The myth of a standing ovation

    There is truth in the clip to be sure, I know way too many people who feel that the sorriest performance merited standing ovation simply because they needed to put their coats on! I am not often moved to give standing applause, but, in this day of "everyone gets an award" the standing ovation is becoming, at least as far as I see it here in Kalamazoo, simply the accepted form of ending any performance. Just one mans opinion.
    Timothy F. Lewis
    "If brains was lard, that boy couldn't grease a very big skillet" J.D. Clampett

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    Default Re: The myth of a standing ovation

    You can't not notice a tepid standing O as much as you can't deny a rowdy "omg I can't believe I just saw that" standing O. The difference is night and day
    That people stand at the end has little significance to performance and is most often out of respect. imo

  13. #10
    Registered User Timbofood's Avatar
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    Default Re: The myth of a standing ovation

    People stand because they want to beat the rush to the parking lot.
    Timothy F. Lewis
    "If brains was lard, that boy couldn't grease a very big skillet" J.D. Clampett

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