Page 5 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast
Results 101 to 125 of 128

Thread: What song, Album, Musician changed your perspective on music?

  1. #101
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    Guildford + Falmouth England
    Posts
    473

    Default Re: What song, Album, Musician changed your perspective on music?

    'Kick Out The Jams' by MC5 - just what you need at 17, if you don't drive off the road. Music might indeed change things to some extent.

    'Directly from my Heart to You' - Sugar Cane Harris, amazing violin solo on Zappa's 'Weasels Ripped my Flesh'. Fiddles aren't just for folk.

    Frank Zappa - said something like 'Rock journalism is people who can write interviewing people who can't talk for people who can't read'. And his music.

    'Memories from a Scotch Sitting Room' by Ivor Cutler, and The Fugs - there really is an audience for all kinds of weird shit out there, and if you want to do it, someone somewhere probably wants to hear it.

    Audiences anywhere I've played - never estimate an audience, either over- or under- .

  2. The following members say thank you to maxr for this post:

    gtani7 

  3. #102
    String-Bending Heretic mandocrucian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    3,133

    Default Re: What song, Album, Musician changed your perspective on music?

    Quote Originally Posted by maxr View Post
    'Kick Out The Jams' by MC5 -
    'Directly from my Heart to You' - Sugar Cane Harris,

    Frank Zappa - said something like 'Rock journalism is people who can write interviewing people who can't talk for people who can't read'. And his music.

    'Memories from a Scotch Sitting Room' by Ivor Cutler, and The Fugs -
    .
    Good picks, I must say. Saw Sugarcane once when he was playing in John Mayall's USA Union lineup (the prime reason for driving down to Tampa for the concert). Like John Cipollina (Quicksilver Messenger Service guitarist) he did tend to repeat himself, but both had such a great sound, and when they were nailing it, they were really nailing it. Sid Page from Dan Hicks' Hot Licks was a true monster violinist.

    For some reason, the Detroit rock stuff got a lot on radio airplay in central FL during 68-73. I'd personally go with early Seger over the MC5. Saw the Bob Seger System numerous times at the Orlando Sports Stadium. He was a favorite in Orlando years before any of that Silver Bullet Band stuff. The Mongrel album sold out in the local stores within 2 weeks when if was released. That early stuff was Bob at his best, imo. While not the greatest lead guitarist, I think he lost some of his overall edge when he gave up on it. Like Fogerty, his playing would have gotten better over time, and kept him rocking harder.

    Add the Bonzos and the Holy Modal Rounders to the Cutler/Fugs division!

  4. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to mandocrucian For This Useful Post:

    DougClowtone2maxr 

  5. #103
    Fingertips of leather Bill McCall's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Forest Grove, Oregon
    Posts
    1,859

    Default Re: What song, Album, Musician changed your perspective on music?

    “The Ballad of Davy Crockett”. I was six, and allowed to play that little yellow record all by myself. Music became accessible. It’s been downhill ever since.
    Play it like you mean it

    Not all the clams are at the beach

    Arrow G
    Clark 2 point
    Ratliff CountryBoy A
    00-21 (voiced by Eldon Stutzman)

  6. #104
    gardener catmandu2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Western MT, USA
    Posts
    8,670

    Default Re: What song, Album, Musician changed your perspective on music?

    Quote Originally Posted by mandocrucian View Post
    ...Detroit rock stuff...
    I grew up in Detroit - there was a constant din of rock everywhere in my youth. I'm a little younger than you guys as I was just a wee lad in 1970, and the Grande Ballroom - where the MC5, The Stooges, Alice Cooper et al were house bands - was soon to close. I was nearly crushed, twice, at the same Rush concert at the Michigan Palace - all soon to close. By the time I was a teen it was all 'stadium rock' down at Cobo hall. There was soul, motown, and jazz on the radio, but little compared to all the rock that permeated everything. I got my first electric guitar at age 10. In 8th grade I was allowed to skip classes and rehearse my 'band' in the auditorium (a habit I'd never change; in college I spent more time studying music than my proper degree).

    So when I was first exposed to avant jazz - which was not played on the radio - this was what changed my perspective on music: happened to be late Coltrane I picked up at a record store without knowing anything about.

    *I also had an early epiphany when I started learning all the acoustic stuff on Led Zep III - started learning banjo, pedal steel, mndln... That, and Exile on Main St, were this city kid's country music influences
    Last edited by catmandu2; May-25-2021 at 12:11pm.

  7. #105
    Innocent Bystander JeffD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Upstate New York
    Posts
    23,714
    Blog Entries
    55

    Default Re: What song, Album, Musician changed your perspective on music?

    Quote Originally Posted by maxr View Post
    Frank Zappa - said something like 'Rock journalism is people who can write interviewing people who can't talk for people who can't read'.
    Can't write.
    Having something to say is highly over rated.

    The entire staff
    funny....

  8. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to JeffD For This Useful Post:


  9. #106
    Registered User DougC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    Posts
    1,576
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default Re: What song, Album, Musician changed your perspective on music?

    Quote Originally Posted by catmandu2 View Post
    I grew up in Detroit - there was a constant din of rock everywhere in my youth.

    So when I was first exposed to avant jazz - which was not played on the radio - this was what changed my perspective on music: happened to be late Coltrane I picked up at a record store without knowing anything about.
    Ah! This explains a lot of why we agree on so much music. I grew up in Detroit and went to class with Marshall Crenshaw - Rock purist if there ever was one.
    Decipit exemplar vitiis imitabile

  10. #107
    gardener catmandu2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Western MT, USA
    Posts
    8,670

    Default Re: What song, Album, Musician changed your perspective on music?

    Hey Doug, ya we talked about that Strings 'n Things shop out on Woodward - where I bought my first good acoustic guitar (Guild D-50, and Flatiron mndln in 82) back in the 70s. My family did the white-flight to the suburbs and I studied (classical guitar) out at Joe Fava's studio in Birmingham.

    But alas, I was too young for the big scene - went to school with Glenn Frey's youngest brother, who is much younger than Glenn, but I didn't know who the Eagles were until later. But Bernie influenced me as I started studying Scruggs banjo then. (Glenn was mentored by Seger prior to moving out west.) I think Bernie was a big influence actually because I recall wanting to be 'the guy who played all the instruments.'


    Quote Originally Posted by Bill McCall View Post
    “The Ballad of Davy Crockett”. I was six, and allowed to play that little yellow record all by myself. Music became accessible. It’s been downhill ever since.
    I had that record too and yes I recall the influence it had as well. I always thought it was Jagger/Richards who led me astray - maybe I've been wrong about that!

    *Aw man, i forgot an important epiphany: seeing Shakti in the late 70s (and Shivkumar Sharma, again with Zakir, in the early 80s). That stuff opened my ears for sure. I imagine it was similar for folks a decade earlier when George brought Ravi over.
    Last edited by catmandu2; May-25-2021 at 3:04pm.

  11. #108
    Registered User DougC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    Posts
    1,576
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default Re: What song, Album, Musician changed your perspective on music?

    Strings n' Things on Woodward Avenue. I wonder how many others have been thru that place. Madonna was there. I also wonder how diverse a world is that can place a guy like me, or any person to really dig stuff from Marvin Gaye to Mike Seeger to Beethoven on the same day. (I got a classical record at the A&P grocery store on 11 Mile Road at Coolidge with 'green stamps'. It was the Pastoral Symphony.) And then George invites Ravi over. Yikes, that's a long way off from "The Ballad of Davy Crockett" or the Three Chimpmunks.
    Decipit exemplar vitiis imitabile

  12. #109
    gardener catmandu2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Western MT, USA
    Posts
    8,670

    Default Re: What song, Album, Musician changed your perspective on music?

    My band played a show in the parking lot of some penguin-themed ice cream joint right on 11 Mile and Woodward, summer ~1975. Stones, Bowie, Cream covers.. There's still that nice church there at that intersection.

  13. #110
    Registered User DougC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    Posts
    1,576
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default Re: What song, Album, Musician changed your perspective on music?

    That would be St. John's Episcopal at 11 Mile Road. In 1975 I had moved to the Bay Area in California, grooving to the Eagles, America and the Doobie Brothers. And then Pink Floyd concerts and Bonnie Raitt gave me and others in the audience wine in paper cups. I'll never forget that one.
    Decipit exemplar vitiis imitabile

  14. #111
    Registered User mswilks's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    26

    Default Re: What song, Album, Musician changed your perspective on music?

    Kate Rusby.

    Hard stop.

    I was in a shop in Tucson in 1998, heard a voice that I really liked, asked the shop owner who it was, and he absent-mindedly pointed to a CD on the "now playing" stand. i bought the CD and headed out the door. When my wife and I started listening to it as we were driving away, I immediately realized that the voice on the CD (Kate Rusby) was not remotely the voice I'd heard in the shop (who knows, but it was a jazz voice).

    Since that time, I've listened to Kate far more frequently than any other artist. I've always had a very broad musical palette, but she led me into a world of English / Scottish / Irish folk music that was fairly new to me at the time and that has informed my listening and playing more than any other musical style. We made a trip to England to see her at the Theatre by the Lake in Keswick in the early 2000s ... definitely one of the highlights of my concert-going career.

    And all because of an inattentive shop owner who pointed me to the "wrong" artist. Here's to serendipity!

  15. #112
    gardener catmandu2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Western MT, USA
    Posts
    8,670

    Default Re: What song, Album, Musician changed your perspective on music?

    Quote Originally Posted by DougC View Post
    That would be St. John's .. In 1975 ...
    Ah I guess it was 74 or maybe even 73...I remember now we were playing jean genie - it was well before when station to station came out.

  16. #113
    Registered User DougC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    Posts
    1,576
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default Re: What song, Album, Musician changed your perspective on music?

    Quote Originally Posted by catmandu2 View Post
    Ah I guess it was 74 or maybe even 73...I remember now we were playing jean genie - it was well before when station to station came out.
    I would have loved to see your band then, as earlier, I played drums thinking I would be the next Ginger Baker. Ha, ha. Thankfully I turned to acoustic guitar and by 1973 I was doing coffee house gigs. Joni Mitchell and James Taylor were much more 'tame'. I did however, zoom up and down Woodward Avenue in my friend's Road Runner. (yikes, were we nuts.)

    We needed someone like Kate

    Decipit exemplar vitiis imitabile

  17. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to DougC For This Useful Post:


  18. #114
    Fingertips of leather Bill McCall's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Forest Grove, Oregon
    Posts
    1,859

    Default Re: What song, Album, Musician changed your perspective on music?

    That’s a gorgeous tune, also done on Adam Steffey’s ‘New Primitive’ album, fortunately not sung by him
    Play it like you mean it

    Not all the clams are at the beach

    Arrow G
    Clark 2 point
    Ratliff CountryBoy A
    00-21 (voiced by Eldon Stutzman)

  19. #115
    Registered User Simon DS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    South of France
    Posts
    1,274

    Default Re: What song, Album, Musician changed your perspective on music?

    Quote Originally Posted by DougC View Post

    See? At 0:57, a capo on a CBOM... like really high. Seventh fret at least!
    No hecklers in the audience.
    Last edited by Simon DS; May-29-2021 at 3:51pm.

  20. #116
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    110

    Default Re: What song, Album, Musician changed your perspective on music?

    Hey DougC and catmandu2, fellow ex-Detroiter here. Left in ‘77 to come to Austin. I remember Strings ‘n Things. A bandmate managed the store. Do you remember Pick ‘n Strum. Also in Birmingham, the proprietor was named Earl. I bought my first three mandolins there, a Kay, followed by a poorly refinished Gibson A, followed by a nicer A4. There used to be a vibrant bluegrass scene in Detroit. I lived on the west side, then my family moved to Ferndale when I was 10, just down Woodward from you all.

  21. #117

    Default Re: What song, Album, Musician changed your perspective on music?

    Yes "Fragile."

  22. #118
    Registered User rnjl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Hudson Valley, New York
    Posts
    267

    Default Re: What song, Album, Musician changed your perspective on music?

    Bill Monroe, Master of Bluegrass.

    Blew my mind at 17. Still doing so many decades later.

  23. #119
    Registered User John Rosett's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Missoula, MT
    Posts
    1,996

    Default Re: What song, Album, Musician changed your perspective on music?

    In 1968. I was an 11 year old fan of bands like the Monkees, Herman and the Hermits, etc. I bought a copy of the Mothers' Freak Out! because it looked so strange, and it changed my life.
    "it's not in bad taste, if it's funny" - john waters

  24. The following members say thank you to John Rosett for this post:


  25. #120
    Registered User DougC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    Posts
    1,576
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default Re: What song, Album, Musician changed your perspective on music?

    Quote Originally Posted by twilson View Post
    Hey DougC and catmandu2, fellow ex-Detroiter here. Left in ‘77 to come to Austin. I remember Strings ‘n Things. A bandmate managed the store. Do you remember Pick ‘n Strum. Also in Birmingham, the proprietor was named Earl. I bought my first three mandolins there, a Kay, followed by a poorly refinished Gibson A, followed by a nicer A4. There used to be a vibrant bluegrass scene in Detroit. I lived on the west side, then my family moved to Ferndale when I was 10, just down Woodward from you all.
    Oh yes. Pick 'n Strum was another hang out. I think we went to these places to have the opportunity to play expensive instruments that we could not afford. Also we got tips on interesting tunes to play as well as other recordings to study.

    At the time 1977, I knew of Flatt & Scruggs and saw folks playing bluegrass at the shops. However, I was involved in Stephen Grossmans's finger style music.

    "A little piece of plastic with a hole' - my favorite quote from 'the Mothers of Invention'

    BTW My mother worked at an engineering firm on 9 mile in Ferndale. My dad grew up in Birmingham.
    Decipit exemplar vitiis imitabile

  26. The following members say thank you to DougC for this post:


  27. #121

    Default Re: What song, Album, Musician changed your perspective on music?

    Bryan Sutton and Russ Barenburg playing 'Big Sciota' on Bryan's 'Not Too Far From The Tree' album.

    That one song opened my eyes to playing fiddle tunes on acoustic guitar. It changed my entire focus from blues/rock to acoustic flatpicking and by extension, bluegrass.

    And now, I have branched out, and have added mandolin to my playing.

    D

  28. #122
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    110

    Default Re: What song, Album, Musician changed your perspective on music?

    I feel fortunate to have grown up in the Detroit area. Lots of music of all kinds, lots of great ethnic food, great art museum, etc.

  29. #123
    Registered User Mike Buesseler's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Whitefish,MT
    Posts
    1,508

    Default Re: What song, Album, Musician changed your perspective on music?

    Leo Kottke. “6 & 12 String”, the armadillo album on Takoma Records.

  30. #124
    gardener catmandu2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Western MT, USA
    Posts
    8,670

    Default Re: What song, Album, Musician changed your perspective on music?

    Quote Originally Posted by twilson View Post
    I feel fortunate to have grown up in the Detroit area. Lots of music of all kinds, lots of great ethnic food, great art museum, etc.
    Detroit has a deep history of jazz, rhythm and blues - Paradise Valley and Black Bottom, for instance - which was long gone before my time. My grandparents lived just up the road in St Clair Shores and I'd like to think they appreciated the incredible scene going on there in the 30s & 40s. But in my day, about the only jazz joint we went to was Baker's on John R. I would have loved to have been there a hundred years ago.

    The only thing I remember about Birmingham in 1970 - aside from my bus rides out to Fava's - was a joint on Woodward that had pillows on the floor and we (10 year old) kids were allowed to go in and hear live music - I think it was some kind of hippy/folk music joint. At that time, if it didn't involve electric guitars and drums I wasn't interested. I was playing (always first chair) sax in 6th grade, but when an older kid wanted me to be in a band with him; he played me ziggy stardust and that was that

  31. #125
    gardener catmandu2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Western MT, USA
    Posts
    8,670

    Default Re: What song, Album, Musician changed your perspective on music?

    I'm just now listening to Fiona Ritchie here talking about Alan Stivell again and playing chieftains dowrosy maggie 73. She said he too learned it from the Chieftains (I think it was might have been my first tune I wanted to fiddle at). And Baker's lounge on Livernois not John R!

    *oops wrong thread!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •