Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: Sanding

  1. #1
    Mandolin & Mandola maker
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Bega NSW, Australia
    Posts
    1,194

    Default Sanding

    Just wandering what you guys are using for sanding tops and backs. I have been using a rubber disc in a drill for 22 years, as described in the Siminoff book. I once tried a random orbital sander, plus a few other things, but nothing worked as well as the rubber discs so I bought a couple spare in case they were discontinued. Problem now is the manufacturers have decided that the rubber discs are obsolete and have discontinued the sanding discs, and I can't get the paper sanding discs any more. I have one disc left in medium grade that I use to sand the rough carved tops and backs. Plenty of fine grade, but they will run out eventually also and then I will be completely stuffed. AAARRRHHHGGG!!! What to do?
    Peter Coombe - mandolins, mandolas and guitars
    http://www.petercoombe.com

  2. #2
    Mindin' my own bizness BJ O'Day's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    175
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default Re: Sanding

    What diameter is the disc? The local Ace Hardware near me stocks 5". Is yours an odd size?
    BJ

  3. #3

    Default Re: Sanding

    Check out the New Wave sanding system. Same concept as the rubber disc, just a little softer and less aggressive on the edges. I bet the rubber disc could retrofitted with Velcro to use the new wave sandpaper on your existing disc.
    A New Wave sanding disc in a right angle drill is a thing of beauty.

  4. #4
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    4,191

    Default Re: Sanding

    On this side of the pond you can get the sticky back disks and put in the center hole.
    I think there are some more sophisticated pads these days but I still have an old rubber one. I only do rough sanding with it because I use a duplicator that leaves a very bumpy surface.

  5. #5
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    4,191

    Default Re: Sanding

    As I would have expected, Marty is much more up on what's out there than me.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Sanding

    I have a high dollar Bosch ROS (NO vibration or dust!) that I put 3M 1/2 inch soft foam pad on. The soft pad conforms to the overall curves both convex and concave sides. A 50 or 60 grit disc takes out the tool marks and inconsistencies pretty quickly. I then switch Mirka Abranet mesh discs that don't clog and leave a beautiful surface. I take the maple up to 400 grit for a flawless surface.
    https://www.amazon.com/3M-Sanding-Interface-28321-Diameter/dp/B007ZT8YG6/ref=sr_1_8?ie=UTF8&qid=1466868312&sr=8-8&keywords=3M+5+inch+foam+disc[/URL]

  7. #7
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    DeKalb, IL
    Posts
    3,487

    Default Re: Sanding

    This thing is a wonderment:

    http://www.hutchinsmfg.com/View-Prod...?group_id=4319

    I have a bunch of different sanders because I do a lot of cabinet work. The Hutchins is really nice for mandolin work, especially with the 1 1/4" pad. You do need a pretty healthy compressor to supply the amount of air it needs, but it's pretty cool.

  8. #8
    Resonate globally Pete Jenner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Mt Victoria, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    3,546
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: Sanding

    I've always just hand sanded. Am I doing something wrong? I must pop down for a visit one of these days Peter, I'm sure I will learn a lot.
    The more I learn, the less I know.

    Peter Jenner
    Blackheathen

    Facebook

  9. #9
    Mandolin & Mandola maker
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Bega NSW, Australia
    Posts
    1,194

    Default Re: Sanding

    Nothing wrong with hand sanding Pete. It is just slow and sweaty. I always hand sand to finish off after sanding with the disc.
    Peter Coombe - mandolins, mandolas and guitars
    http://www.petercoombe.com

  10. #10
    Registered User Tavy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Tavistock UK
    Posts
    4,052

    Default Re: Sanding

    Quote Originally Posted by peter.coombe View Post
    Nothing wrong with hand sanding Pete. It is just slow and sweaty. I always hand sand to finish off after sanding with the disc.
    And it sort of depends on surface area: mandolins are pretty small and let's be honest, once all the tool marks are off (for which a random orbit sander is a big help), it doesn't take that long to sand them out. Larger instruments, or batches of the things are a different matter though...

  11. #11

    Default Re: Sanding

    Hi, all. I was looking back at past posts on sanding, as I'm intent on doing the best possible job I can with preparing my bare instruments for dye and finish. I saw Marty's suggestion of the New Wave sanding system, which I own myself. I've done some woodturning in my time, and I know that system is very useful for that. I have the 3" system with the pads and various grits. My concern would be leaving scratches. With a bowl on the lathe, I'd be less concerned--since it is spinning and the New Wave is also spinning on the drill driver...

    But with a stationary object like a mandolin, it would probably leave scars and scratches since the drill driver only spins in one direction. Is there some kind of random orbital tool that the New Wave could attach to that would avoid this? Most of the smaller orbital sanders/polishers I have seen have pads with threads on them, and the New Wave system just has a smooth stem for a drill drive to clutch on to...

  12. #12
    Registered User amowry's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Bend, OR
    Posts
    2,049

    Default Re: Sanding

    I've always just used a Porter-Cable random orbit sander. I originally used the soft pad, but at some point I switched back to the regular hard pad and haven't noticed much difference. It does require a bit of finesse on mandolin tops and backs, holding it with one hand and constantly moving in small circles, and of course being careful around f holes. One of these days I'm going to upgrade to a Mirka pneumatic sander.

    For the sides of instruments, I sand with 220 on my belt sander before binding, and then after scraping the binding flush I can just do another quick hand sanding with 220 before raising the grain and doing a final sanding with 320.

  13. #13
    Adrian Minarovic
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Banska Bystrica, Slovakia, Europe
    Posts
    2,638

    Default Re: Sanding

    Quote Originally Posted by putnamm View Post
    Hi, all. I was looking back at past posts on sanding, as I'm intent on doing the best possible job I can with preparing my bare instruments for dye and finish. I saw Marty's suggestion of the New Wave sanding system, which I own myself. I've done some woodturning in my time, and I know that system is very useful for that. I have the 3" system with the pads and various grits. My concern would be leaving scratches. With a bowl on the lathe, I'd be less concerned--since it is spinning and the New Wave is also spinning on the drill driver...

    But with a stationary object like a mandolin, it would probably leave scars and scratches since the drill driver only spins in one direction. Is there some kind of random orbital tool that the New Wave could attach to that would avoid this? Most of the smaller orbital sanders/polishers I have seen have pads with threads on them, and the New Wave system just has a smooth stem for a drill drive to clutch on to...
    I'm perhaps too old school guy but I don't think I have used up more than 3-4 sheets of sandpaper total for final sanding (meaning if I combine all the pieces of various grits I've used in last 20 years). I just try to use my tools most effectively I can and there is just not much work left for sandpaper other than remove my dirty fingerprints and some last glue spots right before finishing. I bought few sheets of high quality paper that stays sharp long time and doesn't clog many years ago and still have lots of leftover. I've been using the same strip of sandpaper (actually two 2"x6" in 100 and 180 grits for roughing and finer fitting) for bridge fitting for 15 years now - perhaps and is going strong after more than 50 bridges. But here I also try to maximize use of scrapers.

    Good cabinet scarpers cut at least 90% of work of sandpapers. I don't understand why some folks go from gouges directly to sanding disks - IMO too much mess, dust and you need downdraft table or spend extra time wiping the floor. Working with scrapers saves me time and flexible scrapers help smoothing archingsinto perfect floving curves much better than any sanding disc.
    Adrian

  14. The following members say thank you to HoGo for this post:


Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •