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Thread: Who was the first American mandolin manufacturer?

  1. #101

    Default Re: Who was the first American mandolin manufacturer?

    Quote Originally Posted by allenhopkins View Post
    Luthiers have been building instruments in Paracho, Mexico, reportedly since the 1700's. Possibly could have made some mandolins...? I'm not sure that's what we're looking for as an "American mandolin manufacturer" -- we may be thinking only of the US -- but Mexico's surely in North America.
    i think most people here are only counting the usa, and only the incorporated states. no french or spanish need apply

  2. #102
    Mando-Accumulator Jim Garber's Avatar
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    Default Re: Who was the first American mandolin manufacturer?

    Quote Originally Posted by ollaimh View Post
    i think most people here are only counting the usa, and only the incorporated states. no french or spanish need apply
    Actually given the fact that the original Spanish students were, well, from Spain and actually played bandurrias, I think Allen’s argument is strongly valid.
    Jim

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  4. #103
    Full Grown and Cussin' brunello97's Avatar
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    Default Re: Who was the first American mandolin manufacturer?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Garber View Post
    Actually given the fact that the original Spanish students were, well, from Spain and actually played bandurrias, I think Allen’s argument is strongly valid.
    Leaving out French and Spanish North America doesn't leave much behind

    I've got a mandolin from Paracho and while most folks tend to pan these I find it to be a pretty dependable beater. A hand-dipped finish that is tougher what is on my car.

    The tone may be a bit muddy but the intonation is dead on... which is not something I can say about any number of older mandolins I've had cross my path.

    Nice little story on another product from Michoacan.

    Mick
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  5. #104
    Registered User Mandophile's Avatar
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    Default Re: Who was the first American mandolin manufacturer?

    I found THE Mr. Seville. Once I've reconciled some of the 'conflicting' posts and suggested timelines, I will reveal him in all his amazing splendor. Indeed! Bohmann attracted the extraordinary. As Bruce Hammond stated, we may still be stuck with a limited range between 1882-1885. That said, Bohmann was ahead of Lyon & Healy if a date can be authenticated. Unfortunately dendrochonology can't be applied to wooden mandolins...or can it?

  6. #105
    Registered User Gan Ainm's Avatar
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    Default Re: Who was the first American mandolin manufacturer?

    "...Oliver Ditson hired a young man named John C. Haynes and made him a partner in 1857..."

    Interesting- I have a simple system one keyed flute labeled "JC Haynes Boston" estimated to be around same period. An "easy player" with good intonation and nice if softer sound, once the embouchure was redone by a pro. Actually I don't have it now- it is in Bhutan(!) with an anthropologist/conservationist friend for a year. Adding my thanks to all the historians and researchers providing the erudite information.
    Gan Ainm
    AKA Colin, Athens GA and Nelson Co. VA when I can

  7. #106

    Default Re: Who was the first American mandolin manufacturer?

    I finished reading El Norte by the way, a good read all in all. No mention of mandolins in it though sadly.

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