Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: The Circle of 5ths Part 1

  1. #1
    Registered User zak borden's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Portland, OR
    Posts
    71

    Default The Circle of 5ths Part 1

    Catching up on my tutorials this week. Here's Circle of 5ths: Part 1. Parts 2 and 3 will cover more complex chord progressions: ii-V-I, iii-Vi-ii-V-I and diatonic chordal movement in major and minor scales.

    Enjoy and please comment, "like", suggest improvements and *Subscribe*.

    Thanks y'all!


  2. The Following 10 Users Say Thank You to zak borden For This Useful Post:


  3. #2
    Registered User Charles E.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Saint Augustine Beach FL
    Posts
    4,353

    Default Re: The Circle of 5ths Part 1

    Nice Zak, I have a circle of fifths wall clock in my music room and a friend and I once joked about a "I (heart) the (circle of fifths) bumper sticker".
    Looking forward to video's 2 and 3.
    Charley

    A bunch of stuff with four strings

  4. The following members say thank you to Charles E. for this post:


  5. #3

    Default Re: The Circle of 5ths Part 1

    I only started learning the rudiments of music a half century ago as a cornet player in the primary school brass band, so I figure I can be forgiven for not yet having completely grasped the basics. This video has helped me, but perhaps not in a way you would have anticipated. I have always struggled to recall the relative minor of a key. I could always recall that Am is the relative minor of the key of C (I hope I got that right ), but for the other keys I'd be reduced to fingertip-walking my way up and down an imaginary stave. This video has helped me grasp (again, hopefully correctly), that the relative minor is the 'sixth' of that key. One tone up from the fifth. Lesson learned. Thanks!

    Now, I'm going to have to walk my way around the fretboard to apply the rule of fifths and create a rudiments-based system to be able to calculate all the different elements of the diagram. I'm certain I'll never be able to 'visualise' the clock-like diagram, and I figure there has to be a better way of conjuring it up without carrying a printout with me everywhere.

  6. The following members say thank you to Ron McMillan for this post:


  7. #4
    Registered User MsRutaRutabaga's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Central Maryland
    Posts
    18

    Default Re: The Circle of 5ths Part 1

    I had always wanted to learn more about music theory but could not find the discipline. A couple of years ago, I got involved in a hopeless relationship with a guitar player and thoughts of him were obsessing me. When I tried to sleep, I tossed and turned, going over the questions again and again..."Why not me?" "When will I hear from him?" "How am I going to carry on?" I couldn’t believe that I was feeling like a teenager in love and I wanted to be over it. I wished I liked baseball so that I could substitute batting averages for any thought of him. Maybe I should learn the Periodic Table--a desperate step for an English major. But then I hit upon the solution--the Circle of Fifths! And in time, my sleep became undisturbed, life was back to normal, with the extra added bonus of being able to know the I-IV-V in any key that’s called in a jam. :-)

  8. The following members say thank you to MsRutaRutabaga for this post:


  9. #5

    Default Re: The Circle of 5ths Part 1

    zak
    you are a good communicator/teacher.
    No stumbling, no asides, no digressions, as is so common with ad hoc u-tube explanations I have encountered.
    Logical small steps for the subject matter.

    I am impressed with feeding information in little bits, and with examples!
    Thanks

  10. The following members say thank you to stevedenver for this post:


  11. #6
    Registered User zak borden's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Portland, OR
    Posts
    71

    Default Re: The Circle of 5ths Part 1

    Thanks for the feedback and stories y'all. Yeah committing it to memory takes some practice. I'll definitely be addressing a few quick ways to get this thing once and for all. It's an empowering feeling once you do. One way is to think of the names of the open strings on the mandolin: once you've got C at the top of the "clock", keep going clockwise and you'll find the keys for each open string: G, D, A, E then, after that you just gotta remember "B".

    Then, the open notes of the mandolin repeat... only now you just add a "flat" after each:

    Gb (F#), Db (C#) Ab and Eb.

    Then all you have left is another B (this time Bb) and the only remaining key is F.

    F at this point will stand for "free".

    Hope that helps.

    (and yes I'm still available for Skype lessons. Hint hint).

    -Zak

    www.zakborden.com
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Circle.jpg 
Views:	107 
Size:	173.2 KB 
ID:	126912

  12. The following members say thank you to zak borden for this post:


  13. #7

    Default Re: The Circle of 5ths Part 1

    Food
    Conscious
    Guard
    Dogs
    Always
    Eat
    Burglars??

  14. The following members say thank you to Ron McMillan for this post:


  15. #8
    Registered User Vincent Capostagno's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    York County, Pennsylvania
    Posts
    75

    Default Re: The Circle of 5ths Part 1

    Good Deeds Are Ever Bearing Fruit

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •