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Thread: David Grisman's Dawg pick

  1. #51
    Registered User Ellen T's Avatar
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    Default Re: David Grisman's Dawg pick

    I guess the thick, stiff, rounded picks work for people who play really hard and loud. I play soft, and those picks are all click and no tone for me. I like the cheapie Fenders, too, Roth. I use an oversized medium with a very slightly rounded point, or a heavy and extra heavy, both with a sharper point. I keep trying other sizes/styles/brands and so far always come back to those three.

    I think I'll try filing the one GG I have. So far it's too thick and rounded for my preference, but it's kinda cool looking and I'd like it to be usable. I think I need to try the Dunlops; they sound like something I would find comfortable.

    I have one pick I can't identify - it's dark blue or dull black, very thick, matte surface, rounded sides and points (can barely call them points) and imprinted, in a row, a square and two vertical rectangles on top, second row is 207, bottom row USA. I don't like it enough to care a lot, but I'm mildly curious about what is taking up a little space in my pick tin. Any ideas?
    Last edited by Ellen T; Sep-10-2014 at 9:58pm. Reason: Typos of the world, untie!
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  2. #52
    Different Text eadg145's Avatar
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    Default Re: David Grisman's Dawg pick

    Jim Dunlop 207. Another great pick. A go-to for me. I use the shoulders, not the point.
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  3. #53
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    Default Re: David Grisman's Dawg pick

    Have a few. I can get more sound out of the newer ones, but they aren't my fav. I use ProPlec
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  4. #54
    Professional Dreamer journeybear's Avatar
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    Default Re: David Grisman's Dawg pick

    I'm really surprised by the number of people who modify their picks, filing them and whatnot, and seem to think nothing of it. Maybe it really isn't a big deal, but it seems to me, with so many shapes and sizes and compositions and manufacturers of picks out there, you can't find something suitable "off the rack." How hard can it be to find a pick that, while may not be completely perfect, is well nigh close to it? If a pick is, say, 97.5% ideal, can't you make up the rest by adapting? Or just accepting? What am I missing here?
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  5. #55
    Registered User Ellen T's Avatar
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    Default Re: David Grisman's Dawg pick

    Quote Originally Posted by eadg145 View Post
    Jim Dunlop 207. Another great pick. A go-to for me. I use the shoulders, not the point.
    Urgh, so that's a Dunlop? I do like the texture, but it's so clicky. Next time I'm at our nice local music shop, I'll see if there is a thinner and/or pointier one. Thanks for the info.
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  6. #56

    Default Re: David Grisman's Dawg pick

    Just used the new Dawg Pick to get the most possible jazz sound out of my Kentucky electric.

  7. #57
    mandolin slinger Steve Ostrander's Avatar
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    Default Re: David Grisman's Dawg pick

    While I am a huge fan of Dawg's music, I have never warmed up to his namesake plectrum. Of course I naively assumed that if I bought one I would become an instant mandolin virtuoso and beautiful women would swoon in my presence. So far, nothing of the sort has occurred. I haven't done any filing or sanding, so I may investigate that.

    Methinks that the Dawg could make the cheapest guitar store logo pick, or perhaps one punched out of an expired credit card, sound like a million pounds sterling.
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  8. #58
    Middle-Aged Old-Timer Tobin's Avatar
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    Default Re: David Grisman's Dawg pick

    I finally got around to buying the new style Dawg pick with a recent order from Elderly (I did the three-fer to get the discounted price). I tried it last night on various instruments.

    My first reaction was pretty typical of what most here have said. It sounds muddy, and it's difficult to get volume from it. And for the first half-hour, I was getting a weird low-pitched squeak from the pick gliding off the strings. I guess it finally wore off enough micrometers of material from the edge of the pick for that sound to go away.

    Anyway, after using the Dawg pick for about 2-1/2 hours, I came to the realization that I kind of like it. It's got a nice dark sound that suits certain styles of music. It won't replace the Blue Chip as my primary pick, or even the Wegen as my secondary choice. But the Dawg pick is a solid contender for my tertiary pick, and I can see myself choosing it for particular tunes, as long as I don't need to command full volume.

  9. #59
    Innocent Bystander JeffD's Avatar
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    Default Re: David Grisman's Dawg pick

    Quote Originally Posted by Tobin View Post
    and I can see myself choosing it for particular tunes,
    All my picks are that way. For particular tunes, or particular venues or particular effects.
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  10. #60

    Default Re: David Grisman's Dawg pick

    The day I need a particular pick for a particular tune or venue will be the day I take up the trombone.

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  12. #61
    Middle-Aged Old-Timer Tobin's Avatar
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    Default Re: David Grisman's Dawg pick

    Quote Originally Posted by OldSausage View Post
    The day I need a particular pick for a particular tune or venue will be the day I take up the trombone.
    I can see how it would be ideal to just adapt one's technique to suit different tunes, venues, etc. That really does make a lot of sense in terms of keeping the equipment simple, while expanding one's repertoire and skill to be able to adapt to the musical needs of the moment. I usually take that approach, actually.

    But then again, I am also discovering the pleasures of using the 'right tools for the job'. Using a Blue Chip on a modern F5 is a better combination of tools for bluegrass than it would be for OT or ITM, right? For those traditional styles I might choose to use a different pick and even a different mandolin. My F4 sounds great with the Wegen pick for those styles. It doesn't mean I can't use any combination for any style (nor does it mean I "need" any particular combination to play), but I think it helps bring out the soul of the music when I can tailor my mandolin's tone to the mood of the tune.

    If something as simple as using a different pick increases one's enjoyment of the musical quality, why would one want to avoid it? Based on your response, you seem to have rather strong feelings about it. Is there some principle at stake here?

  13. #62
    Registered User Onesound's Avatar
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    Default Re: David Grisman's Dawg pick

    I have nothing new to add except my name to the "not for me" list. I can't believe that the Dawg sounds so good using them. When I use them my tone looses all brightness and harmonics - makes my instruments sound dead. I've tried adding a point to one with the result that my mando sounded less dead - but dead is dead. To add to the downer, the Dawg Golden Gates make me feel like I'm picking with a tea cup saucer!
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  14. #63
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    Default Re: David Grisman's Dawg pick

    Quote Originally Posted by Tobin View Post
    Anyway, after using the Dawg pick for about 2-1/2 hours, I came to the realization that I kind of like it. It's got a nice dark sound that suits certain styles of music.
    Even a pick can open up.

  15. #64
    Middle-Aged Old-Timer Tobin's Avatar
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    Default Re: David Grisman's Dawg pick

    Quote Originally Posted by Onesound View Post
    When I use them my tone looses all brightness and harmonics - makes my instruments sound dead.
    I quite agree. It's that deadness which gives a dark mood to the tone. In fact, it's the opposite of what I get from my Blue Chip, which is why it intrigues me. In some ways, it's like switching to flat-wound strings but without the hassle of having to change strings.

    The Golden Gate pick never did it for me either. The material is probably OK, but the shape is too round for me to be able to pull any decent sound out of it. The Dawg pick, for me, offers what the Golden Gate should have, but didn't.

  16. #65
    Registered User dusty miller's Avatar
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    Default Re: David Grisman's Dawg pick

    Quote Originally Posted by Tobin View Post
    It's that deadness which gives a dark mood to the tone. In fact, it's the opposite of what I get from my Blue Chip, which is why it intrigues me.
    Maybe I'll give the Dawg pick another shot. I usually stick with my Wegen and Blue Chip. I was underwhelmed the first couple times I tried it for the same reasons some of the others have mentioned.
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  17. #66
    Registered User DavidKOS's Avatar
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    Default Re: David Grisman's Dawg pick

    I'm not a user of those big round thick picks. I prefer something more pointy!

    However those picks seem to be the start of the fad for those round thick plectra.

  18. #67
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    Default Re: David Grisman's Dawg pick

    I go back and forth Fender 346 wankel triangle and the Dawg

    though I find the BC CT 55 a nice one , on my MixA5.
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  19. #68
    Registered User Dan Ready's Avatar
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    Default Re: David Grisman's Dawg pick

    I like 'em. I used to shape the old ones a bit but I find the new ones sound what I would call " natural ". Compared to using nails they're just a little brighter. I use them on 2 old Gibsons and 1 newer Gibson F5. I got so use to them, I use them on electric and acoustic guitars as well. After reading some of this thread, I went through a collection of old picks but they all sounded thin and felt too small to hold. Go figure.

  20. #69
    fishing with my mando darrylicshon's Avatar
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    Default Re: David Grisman's Dawg pick

    Well after trying my dawg pick for a month or so i have become used to it , but only for certin times and on certin mandolins, i received a new dawg pick it isn't as good as the original atleast not yet. I have a golden gate pick coming soon can't wait to try it, i also ran across a v-pick it was really thick didn't like it,need to try otherv-picks
    Now i carry around 6 different picks in my pocket, they all give different sounds, i will have to get a blue chip soon
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  21. #70

    Default Re: David Grisman's Dawg pick

    Quote Originally Posted by Tobin View Post
    If something as simple as using a different pick increases one's enjoyment of the musical quality, why would one want to avoid it? Based on your response, you seem to have rather strong feelings about it. Is there some principle at stake here?
    No, I'm just saying what I do. I do find it highly implausible that the difference in sound between a Blue Chip and a Wegen could even be perceived by any audience, but if it makes a big difference to how you feel about playing that style, go for it.

    I personally would also happily use your nice F5 for any style of mandolin music, old time, ITM, choro, rock, pop, you name it. Look at Chris Thile. Does he futz around swapping mandos and picks in his genre-defying shows? No. If you have a good sounding mandolin, it's not going to suddenly sound like ass because you're playing a different genre. But again, others will surely differ with me on that, and that's fine.
    Last edited by OldSausage; Nov-06-2014 at 9:50am.

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  23. #71
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    Default Re: David Grisman's Dawg pick

    Old thread... but maybe I'll get lucky and this will see the right attention for my purposes.

    I'm actually trying to source some of the original D-P Dawg picks. The more rounded ones. They're the right size for me as I do pick conjuring. When I'm plucking I'll park the pick/ hold it in the palm side folds of my long finger. The new D'Andrea 385 mando pick is the right shape, but it's too large for me to hold on to it when I park it. I've always liked that darker, warmer sound they offer in playing chordal style jazz.
    If anyone has some of the original D-P picks (and not the newer iteration more pointed D-P2) please be in touch.

    I'm also very partial to the torlon mustard colored McCray mando pick. If anyone has one of them laying around that they could part with... likewise, please be in touch.
    Tanks heaps and much appreciated,
    Crawz
    Last edited by Crawz; Apr-16-2019 at 3:18am.

  24. #72
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    Default Re: David Grisman's Dawg pick

    Quote Originally Posted by Crawz View Post
    I'm actually trying to source some of the original D-P Dawg picks. The more rounded ones. They're the right size for me as I do pick conjuring. When I'm plucking I'll park the pick/ hold it in the palm side folds of my long finger. The new D'Andrea 385 mando pick is the right shape, but it's too large for me to hold on to it when I park it. I've always liked that darker, warmer sound they offer in playing chordal style jazz.
    If anyone has some of the original D-P picks (and not the newer iteration more pointed D-P2) please be in touch.
    Are these on Dawg's web site not what you're looking for?

  25. #73
    Mandolin user MontanaMatt's Avatar
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    Default Re: David Grisman's Dawg pick

    Quote Originally Posted by Crawz View Post
    Old thread... but maybe I'll get lucky and this will see the right attention for my purposes.

    I'm actually trying to source some of the original D-P Dawg picks. The more rounded ones. They're the right size for me as I do pick conjuring. When I'm plucking I'll park the pick/ hold it in the palm side folds of my long finger. The new D'Andrea 385 mando pick is the right shape, but it's too large for me to hold on to it when I park it. I've always liked that darker, warmer sound they offer in playing chordal style jazz.
    If anyone has some of the original D-P picks (and not the newer iteration more pointed D-P2) please be in touch.

    I'm also very partial to the torlon mustard colored McCray mando pick. If anyone has one of them laying around that they could part with... likewise, please be in touch.
    Tanks heaps and much appreciated,
    Crawz
    I sent you a message Crawz ...if you haven’t set up your inbox to announce your messages, check there
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  26. #74

    Default Re: David Grisman's Dawg pick

    Dawg picks may be back, but the webpage doesn’t display properly, at least on my iPad.
    Play it like you mean it.

  27. #75

    Default Re: David Grisman's Dawg pick

    I've tried rounded picks in general and found I couldn't play very well with them, well I can't play very well with anything, but less well with rounded picks. Now here's the kicker, now and again I unknowingly use the rounded tip on my TAD 1R 60 and I seem to play as well as ever, so my brain is messing with me.
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