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Thread: Kentucky 675 Korean vs newer Chinese

  1. #1
    texaspaul texaspaul's Avatar
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    Default Kentucky 675 Korean vs newer Chinese

    First do any if the Chinese 675's have Florida fretboard extensions?

    Now to quality and sound. This is a generalized question knowing there can be a difference from representative individual instruments from each manufacturing country. I have not played a newer Chinese and the lastKorean built 675 was a factory 2nd looked good nice sound but a badly bowed neck.
    Many years ago I played a Japanese 675 very good sounding but plain woods.

  2. #2

    Default Re: Kentucky 675 Korean vs newer Chinese

    Hi Paul,

    In general, They rate like this:
    1. The latest Chinese versions (best)
    2. Korean/mid Chinese
    3. Early Chinese



    There are Chinese versions with and without the Flordia and with and without a radiused fingerboard. Anything with the radiused, abbreviated fingerboard is around 2007 or newer. Older than that and the differences will not be as obvious.
    Robert Fear
    http://www.folkmusician.com

    "Education is when you read the fine print; experience is what you get when you don't.
    " - Pete Seeger

  3. #3
    texaspaul texaspaul's Avatar
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    Default Re: Kentucky 675 Korean vs newer Chinese

    Thank you Robert,
    I have been looking into 2; one is the abbreviated radius fingerboard an is stated to be Chinese made 675. The other has Florida extension and seller is not mandolin savvy. Just says come and see it. I think it is overpriced at $600 with nice rectangle case. Chinese made has shaped HSC not a lot of figure in good condition $500.
    Did they make the 675 in Japan?

  4. #4

    Default Re: Kentucky 675 Korean vs newer Chinese

    I am not sure if there was a Japanese KM-675.

    Something else I just recalled... I believe the Korean and early Chinese versions were actually "KM-675-S". The "S" just meant solid and was later dropped off all of the mandolins. With some research, these can also be dated within a few years by the tailpiece, inlays, tuners, truss rod cover and bridge.
    Robert Fear
    http://www.folkmusician.com

    "Education is when you read the fine print; experience is what you get when you don't.
    " - Pete Seeger

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