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Thread: maple bridge for mandolin

  1. #1
    Registered User carbonpiou's Avatar
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    Default maple bridge for mandolin

    Some photographs of the maple bridge which I designed and manufactured for the last carbon mandoline that I have just finished (for my own use, I am not professional!)
    I carried out 6 models in various materials composite or wood. This model gives the best result.
    The sound is very balanced, the acute ones are brilliant and the low deep ones, which I had not managed to obtain with the other bridges manufactured.
    The sillet of bridge is carried out starting from Ag, Cu and Sn alloy.

    Click image for larger version. 

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  3. #2
    Registered User Carl Robin's Avatar
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    Default Re: maple bridge for mandolin

    It's a beauty. I made a bridge, for the first time ever, a few days ago. Makes a big difference.

  4. #3

    Default Re: maple bridge for mandolin

    Really an exquisite look. Form following function, it's a beauty.

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    Registered User Ron Cox's Avatar
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    Default Re: maple bridge for mandolin

    I don't know enough about how wood would transmit the sound, so I must ask. How is the sound compared to a similar rosewood or ebony bridge. I would think that, maple being harder, it would transmit the tone as well if not better? I would love to see one of those on my flat-top mandolin, just for looks alone.

  6. #5

    Default Re: maple bridge for mandolin

    Maple is not harder than ebony, to the contrary ebony is much harder than maple.
    Bill Snyder

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    Rush Burkhardt Rush Burkhardt's Avatar
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    Default Re: maple bridge for mandolin

    1. There's some great information regarding bridge construction by Red Henry.

    http://www.murphymethod.com/index.cf...t&contentId=87

    2. There is an additional MC thread documenting this topic.

    http://www.mandolincafe.com/forum/sh...ighlight=henry


  9. #7
    Mando-Accumulator Jim Garber's Avatar
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    Default Re: maple bridge for mandolin

    These do seem to follow the Red Henry design with the addition of the metal saddles. So, carbonpiou, which saddle worked the best? Silver, copper or tin?
    Jim

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    Registered User carbonpiou's Avatar
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    Default Re: maple bridge for mandolin

    Jim, the mixture Ag/Cu/Sn are extremely hard, much more in any case that brass. The result is found in the harmonics and the depth of the low registers.
    I went on the site of Red Henry. We made the same approach, without us to know…

  11. #9
    Mando-Accumulator Jim Garber's Avatar
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    Default Re: maple bridge for mandolin

    Ah, I see -- you do say it is an alloy. Very interesting.
    Jim

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  12. #10

    Default Re: maple bridge for mandolin

    Very nice bridge.

    How is the sound compared to a similar rosewood or ebony bridge
    Typically, maple increases volume and sounds brighter (at the expense of some depth). I can see some mandolins benefitting from a maple bridge. Especially mandolins that are not your standard F hole.
    Robert Fear
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    Certified! Bernie Daniel's Avatar
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    Default Re: maple bridge for mandolin

    Quote Originally Posted by carbonpiou View Post
    Some photographs of the maple bridge which I designed and manufactured for the last carbon mandoline that I have just finished (for my own use, I am not professional!)
    I carried out 6 models in various materials composite or wood. This model gives the best result.
    The sound is very balanced, the acute ones are brilliant and the low deep ones, which I had not managed to obtain with the other bridges manufactured.
    The sillet of bridge is carried out starting from Ag, Cu and Sn alloy.
    It looks nice but there is no consideration for compensation on this bridge? How is the pitch at the 12th fret compared to opne strings?
    Bernie
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    Due to current budgetary restrictions the light at the end of the tunnel has been turned off -- sorry about the inconvenience.

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  15. #12
    Registered User carbonpiou's Avatar
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    Default Re: maple bridge for mandolin

    Indeed, there is no compensation on the bridge. In my many tests, I carried out a pon with a compensation extrêmemnt specifies, not made with calculation, but with a measurement of frequency. Frankly, the variation of accuracy between the bridge not compensated and compensated was very tiny (less than 0.3mm)
    This can be explained by my choice of strings (10-13-24-34) usually used on the classical mandolines which also do not have a compensated bridge. and especially by the fact why the fretboard is rigorously right with an action regulated very low (1.2mm at 12th fret on E strings and 1.5mm on the G stringsn without buz.
    For your information, the tuning fork of my mandoline is of 352mm (personal choice related to my morphology) My bridge is regulated with 355mm on E strings and 356 mm on G side. This adjustment makes it possible to have the best accuracy on the level of hoops 1 to 7 (the most played) and to preserve the accuracy after the 12th fret.

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  17. #13
    Certified! Bernie Daniel's Avatar
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    Default Re: maple bridge for mandolin

    Quote Originally Posted by carbonpiou View Post
    Indeed, there is no compensation on the bridge. In my many tests, I carried out a pon with a compensation extrêmemnt specifies, not made with calculation, but with a measurement of frequency. Frankly, the variation of accuracy between the bridge not compensated and compensated was very tiny (less than 0.3mm)
    This can be explained by my choice of strings (10-13-24-34) usually used on the classical mandolines which also do not have a compensated bridge. and especially by the fact why the fretboard is rigorously right with an action regulated very low (1.2mm at 12th fret on E strings and 1.5mm on the G stringsn without buz.
    For your information, the tuning fork of my mandoline is of 352mm (personal choice related to my morphology) My bridge is regulated with 355mm on E strings and 356 mm on G side. This adjustment makes it possible to have the best accuracy on the level of hoops 1 to 7 (the most played) and to preserve the accuracy after the 12th fret.
    Very good! Well it is a beautiful bit of work and looks to be very low mass. The use of light gauge strings probably helps a lot the the compensation like you say. Are you going to stain the bridge black to match the mandolin?
    Bernie
    ____
    Due to current budgetary restrictions the light at the end of the tunnel has been turned off -- sorry about the inconvenience.

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