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Thread: Monroe mando camp in Spt

  1. #51

    Default Re: Monroe mando camp in Spt

    Big fun! This was my fourth camp, not consecutive. It was the best one. Great instruction, good jamming. Highlights for me included getting to sing and jam with Mark Royal, Richard Bailey, David Davis, and Skip Gorman. Also went with some folks on Friday night to catch Roland White and his group (including Scott Vestel sitting in on banjo) for their album release party at Station Inn, and then attending the instructor concert at Carter's Vintage Guitars. Carters is the best. Where else can you try out mandolins made by Gilchrist, Dudenbostel, Monteleone, Duff, Daley, Henderson, and Loar? Fellow campers were great, location rocked! My eyes were finally opened to probably the most basic thing about Monroe style playing.....rhythm, rhythm, rhythm, as if you are playing for dancers. Keep that right hand going (unless your left-handed). Looking forward to next year.

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  3. #52

    Default Re: Monroe mando camp in Spt

    Just got back late last night after the 8 hour drive home from Nashville. For anyone who was wondering what it was like...it was worth it. It was worth the drive and it was worth the money.
    As John G. said above, a big thank you to the Cafe for being a part of this Monroe Camp. Mostly though (at least from my perspective), a HUGE thank you to Heidi and Mike Compton and all their efforts that went into this learning experience.

    I am a relative rookie at this whole mandolin thing, especially the Monroe style of playing. It's hard to reconcile the fact that just because you like a style does not necessarily mean you can even come close to playing that way. (For me anyway, that is true. )When I arrived Thursday evening and discovered that this campground was populated with a huge number of folks that could really play, I mean really play and play well, it was a bit intimidating.

    It took a while, but I eventually realized that at some point, even the really great pickers there had to start somewhere. I attended some beginner classes and then some intermediate classes. The instructors were all top-notch...lots of real life experience and awesome abilities. I know I didn't soak up enough of it, but if just a little bit of it seeped into my brain, that's all I can ask.

    I really enjoyed meeting the people that are a part of this forum. I was impressed with the friendliness of all, and blown away by the playing ability of many. (...ok, you know who you are...you can stop blushing.)

    As far as the highlights go, the trip to Carter's Vintage has to rank way up there. To get the chance to sit down and play so many first class mandolins is hard to describe. I know for sure that only the mandolin crowd would or could possibly understand. And yes, I played a Feb-18th-'24 Loar. For some reason, I was unable to make it sound much better than my Weber. Maybe it was because I forgot my Blue-Chip. Either way, it was a ton of fun!
    The concert that was put on by the 'staff' was fantastic... the youngsters that played were incredible and inspiring even if I did feel like strangling them! (just kidding of course, but how in the heck can these kids be so good and still so young?) At any rate, I was proud to be a part of the Compton effort to support and mentor these kids.

    One thing that I will never forget though was getting the chance to sing with Dave Davis singing tenor right next to me. For one brief, shining moment, I was a Warrior River Boy! What a great singer and a truly nice human being that guy is! I'm still on cloud 9.

    This was my first mandolin camp, or music camp of any kind. It was a great way to start. As Arnold said.."I'll be back.".

    Clark

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  5. #53
    Registered User John Gardinsky's Avatar
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    Default Re: Monroe mando camp in Spt

    That's the spirit Clark. It kind of gets in you doesn't it? After nine years of this camp I can still find so much to learn. Each year I come home with a head full of ideas and a list of new techniques to work on. Rhythm, rhythm, rhythm, syncopation, tremolo, slurs, chords and their parts...for the truly bitten it is cloud nine.

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  7. #54
    Registered User geoffa's Avatar
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    Default Re: Monroe mando camp in Spt

    For me one of the highlights was seeing how welcoming, friendly, and accommodating everyone was to a beginning picker like myself. When I got there Thursday evening, I was blown away by how good everyone was (just like Clark mentioned). It was definitely intimidating. I honestly didn't want to take my mandolin out of its case. John Gardinsky, while taking a break from jamming, walked over and introduced himself. He encouraged me to just get in there and try because all those amazing pickers were in the same boat at one point in their lives too. I did and it was a blast!

    I felt like another thing I took away from this experience was knowing where to go next with learning how to pick. Watching and hearing other pickers in person is so different than watching videos online. I thought that was probably the case going in, but I didn't realize the extent to which it would hold true. I'm definitely planning on getting out more often to pick with other people.

    Lastly, Paul Duff did an amazing job installing a new bridge on my mandolin. The difference in its playability and sound is remarkable. Can't thank him and Will Kimble enough for being there and working on all of our instruments.

    This camp is such a great community. I feel fortunate to have discovered it. Will definitely be attending again.

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  9. #55

    Default Re: Monroe mando camp in Spt

    Where to start in describing a perfect long weekend? A few highlights…

    - A stop at the candy store (Carter Vintage) to play walls full of amazing mandolins on my way to camp. The Carter folks were extremely gracious and cordial whether you were picking solo on a quiet Thursday afternoon or among a mob of Monroe fanatics Saturday night before the instructor concert.

    - Getting to shake Roland White’s hand at the Thursday night welcome jam. Went something like…me: “Hey Roland White! Cool. I have to shake your hand”. Roland in complete deadpan: “Which hand?” A great Nashville crew came in as well to lead/support the jam.

    - Front row center for Compton’s blues class. A fellow camper generously loaned me his mandolin for the duration of the class with the guidance “you got to bang on it!” Thanks John

    - Decoding double stops and chord position licks via a 1-1 session with David Davis.

    - John Keith’s Saturday night concert performance. Powerful voice. Powerful picking.

    - Impromptu instruction from Mark Royal on a waltz he wrote. I can still pick it but forgot the name!

    - Saturday morning at the luthier shop picking Will Kimble’s latest two point while Paul Duff worked on my Ramsey. Paul then started playing my mandolin to back-up Will on guitar singing one of his own songs. Very cool stuff. I got to play two used Kimbles and two new Duffs at Carter’s as well. All four were superb instruments.

    - Raymond Huffmaster’s tips on rhythm and some really great Monroe stories.

    - Making new friends from all over the country (and Australia!) with a common appreciation of Bill Monroe’s great music. Cold, local microbrew on tap every night for the jams was pretty sweet too.

    - Closing out my class "work" with Skip Gorman’s cowboy songs in Monroe’s repertoire. Perfect.

    - Finally, I would like to thank Heidi and Mike for hosting and organizing an amazing long weekend of music, learning, and fun. See you next year! Dan

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  11. #56
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    Default Re: Monroe mando camp in Spt

    Dang...the more I read this the more I envy those who got to go. I had to travel that week but I am going to put it in my list for next year. Maybe by then I will be further along and not so intimidated.

    Awesome stories...thanks!

  12. #57
    Economandolinist Amanda Gregg's Avatar
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    Default Re: Monroe mando camp in Spt

    Alan, definitely don't be intimidated. Everybody's so nice! You'll love it.
    Amanda

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  14. #58
    Troy Shellhamer 9lbShellhamer's Avatar
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    Default Re: Monroe mando camp in Spt

    A shot in the dark here but...

    One of the most beneficial classes I attended this year was Mike Compton's rhythm class. Do any of the attendee's from this year who recorded their classes happen to have their recording of that section? Specifically, where he goes over these rhythm figures?

    Click image for larger version. 

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  15. #59
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    Default Re: Monroe mando camp in Spt

    Thought it might be time to revive this thread since the Second Annual Monroe Mandolin Camp is on again this Fall 2015, at a different location and an extended schedule. I missed it last year due to work obligations but am determined to not let that happen again this year! http://monroemandolincamp.com/

    I am working on the slow jam list and will be posting some thoughts about that for discussion. Let's hear from those who went last year and especially those who look forward to going again. I'd like to hear how the song list was used in the course of the classes.
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  16. #60
    Troy Shellhamer 9lbShellhamer's Avatar
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    Default Re: Monroe mando camp in Spt

    Hey Kevin,

    Last year was my first. The songs are just basically references for songs that are likely to be played as everyone picks in small groups in the evenings. This year I plan on knowing more Monroe instrumentals and making sure I know the chords to all as well, not just the melody.

    Currently as far as monroe tunes, I'm just trying to learn everything on the Noam Plays Kenny Plays Bill album. I'm about half way through and it's just a blast to play along with.

    Last year I didn't know the chords to most of these instrumentals by heart and there often isn't a guitar to follow the chords so this year I've got the chords and melodies down to everything in my repertoire (which is only about 20 songs but is growing in anticipation of being a more active participant in mando only jams.)

    It's an inspirational weekend.
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    (And a bunch of wood and wire that makes noise...)

  17. #61

    Default Re: Monroe mando camp in Spt

    Sorry if I missed another thread, but...

    2015 Monroe Camp roll call!

    Hope to see some familiar faces again this year. Looks like a pretty amazing couple of days in store.

    Dan

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