Results 1 to 23 of 23

Thread: 1927 Gibson A-Jr #84192 Question

  1. #1
    Registered User CWRoyds's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    San Rafael, Ca
    Posts
    488

    Default 1927 Gibson A-Jr #84192 Question

    Hi all,

    A friend just offered me a 1927 Gibson A-Jr Mandolin (Serial #84192).
    He just inherited it from an Uncle, and doesn't really want it.
    From the photos, it seems that there is a crack down the front.
    I asked for more photos, so I can get a better look at the overall shape it is in.
    I would kind of like to own one, as they are a cool mando IMHO.

    I have a couple of questions.

    1) What is the value of the mandolin in current cracked condition.

    2) How much would it cost to have a top crack like that repaired. I am aware that there may be other problems, but I am just talking general cost of that kind of crack repair.

    2) Once that kind of crack is fixed, what might be a reasonable value?

    The owner doesn't really care about it, but I want to give him an accurate value of the mandolin in repaired condition, and what it would cost to fix, so if I don't want to go through the trouble, he will know what to sell it for.

    Any advice is appreciated.


    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Gibson-AJr_2.jpg 
Views:	136 
Size:	201.9 KB 
ID:	170924
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	GIbson-AJr_1.jpg 
Views:	52 
Size:	177.5 KB 
ID:	170923
    Last edited by CWRoyds; Sep-08-2018 at 9:54pm.
    Mandolins: Northfield 5-Bar Artist Model "Old Dog", J Bovier F5 Special, Gibson A-00 (1940)
    Fiddles: 1920s Strad copy, 1930s Strad copy, Liu Xi T20, Liu Xi T19+ Dark.
    Guitars: Taylor 514c (1995), Gibson Southern Jumbo (1940s), Gibson L-48 (1940s), Les Paul Custom (1978), Fender Strat (Black/RWFB) (1984), Fender Strat (Candy Apple Red/MFB) (1985).
    Sitars: Hiren Roy KP (1980s), Naskar (1970s), Naskar (1960s).
    Misc: 8 Course Lute (L.K.Brown)

  2. #2

    Default Re: 1927 Gibson A-Jr #84192 Question

    The crack is no big deal, but the brace underneith is probably loose, and if the top has sunk, that could be a back removal. Others will have to chime in as to worth.

    It would be a fun mandolin to own.
    Silverangel A
    Michael Kelly LSFTB
    Arches F style kit
    1913 Gibson A-1

  3. #3
    Registered User CWRoyds's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    San Rafael, Ca
    Posts
    488

    Default Re: 1927 Gibson A-Jr #84192 Question

    Right??
    I don’t really need one, and I’m not really an oval hole guy, but as ovals go, I kinda like the A-Jr vibe.
    I figure I should own an oval, so it might as well be a AJr
    Mandolins: Northfield 5-Bar Artist Model "Old Dog", J Bovier F5 Special, Gibson A-00 (1940)
    Fiddles: 1920s Strad copy, 1930s Strad copy, Liu Xi T20, Liu Xi T19+ Dark.
    Guitars: Taylor 514c (1995), Gibson Southern Jumbo (1940s), Gibson L-48 (1940s), Les Paul Custom (1978), Fender Strat (Black/RWFB) (1984), Fender Strat (Candy Apple Red/MFB) (1985).
    Sitars: Hiren Roy KP (1980s), Naskar (1970s), Naskar (1960s).
    Misc: 8 Course Lute (L.K.Brown)

  4. #4

    Default Re: 1927 Gibson A-Jr #84192 Question

    1. My guess is $3-400
    2. I think you'd be doing well to have that crack repaired for $200 in your area, with average set up, budget twice that.
    2. The last few A-Jr paddle heads to sell on Ebay went between $475 and $575 inc shipping.

    With a good repair and set up it would bring closer to $1,000 in a reputable store.

    PS I love the A-Jrs. Super fun, and sometimes they sound GREAT.

    Quote Originally Posted by CWRoyds View Post
    1) What is the value of the mandolin in current cracked condition.

    2) How much would it cost to have a top crack like that repaired. I am aware that there may be other problems, but I am just talking gerenal cost of that kind of crack repair.

    2) Once that kind of crack is fixed, what might be a reasonable value?
    BradKlein
    Senior Producer, Twangbox
    Twangbox Videos

  5. The following members say thank you to BradKlein for this post:


  6. #5
    Registered User CWRoyds's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    San Rafael, Ca
    Posts
    488

    Default Re: 1927 Gibson A-Jr #84192 Question

    Yeah, I looked around the cafe on posts about AJrs, and saw prices of ones for sale, but the prices being asked varied wildly.
    As this one is cracked, I figured that takes it down quite a bit, even if repaired.
    Im not sure I want to invest $300 on the Mando and another $200 on the crack fix.
    I want to get him a fair deal, even if it is not me who buys it.
    I guess Id have a $500 AJr, but if you can get one for a little more that was never broken, why not go that route.

    I may still buy it.
    Maybe, since it is not worth much, he might do a dirt cheap deal, seeing as I would have to put money in to fix it up.
    I am certain he doesnt really want to have to mess with it, and would rather get it to someone who might just enjoy having it.

    Do yall think the crack, if it is just a clean crack, will significantly effect the tone if fixed correctly?
    I mean, it looks like a pretty big crack, if not all the way from tail to oval hole.

    Other than the crack, it looks like it is in pretty good shape.
    Mandolins: Northfield 5-Bar Artist Model "Old Dog", J Bovier F5 Special, Gibson A-00 (1940)
    Fiddles: 1920s Strad copy, 1930s Strad copy, Liu Xi T20, Liu Xi T19+ Dark.
    Guitars: Taylor 514c (1995), Gibson Southern Jumbo (1940s), Gibson L-48 (1940s), Les Paul Custom (1978), Fender Strat (Black/RWFB) (1984), Fender Strat (Candy Apple Red/MFB) (1985).
    Sitars: Hiren Roy KP (1980s), Naskar (1970s), Naskar (1960s).
    Misc: 8 Course Lute (L.K.Brown)

  7. #6

    Default Re: 1927 Gibson A-Jr #84192 Question

    Take it to Schoenberg. Don't play the snakehead jr. they might still have there. I agree top dollar in a shop like that would be $900-1000. Probably be a top dollar repair there too. That means your cost should be no more than $700 minus the repair cost.

    It's the kind of instrument I'd be interested in for $200 to practice my fixit skills on.
    Silverangel A
    Michael Kelly LSFTB
    Arches F style kit
    1913 Gibson A-1

  8. The following members say thank you to Br1ck for this post:


  9. #7
    Registered User CWRoyds's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    San Rafael, Ca
    Posts
    488

    Default Re: 1927 Gibson A-Jr #84192 Question

    I would like to learn to fix instruments, possibly build some.
    I don’t really have the basic shop skills for that though
    I am not particularly handy.

    I have enjoyed learning to maintain instruments myself.
    It is a useful skill, especially when you play an instrument that not many people can correctly set up.
    I have learned to find a guy who has specific knowledge of mandolin.
    Mandolins: Northfield 5-Bar Artist Model "Old Dog", J Bovier F5 Special, Gibson A-00 (1940)
    Fiddles: 1920s Strad copy, 1930s Strad copy, Liu Xi T20, Liu Xi T19+ Dark.
    Guitars: Taylor 514c (1995), Gibson Southern Jumbo (1940s), Gibson L-48 (1940s), Les Paul Custom (1978), Fender Strat (Black/RWFB) (1984), Fender Strat (Candy Apple Red/MFB) (1985).
    Sitars: Hiren Roy KP (1980s), Naskar (1970s), Naskar (1960s).
    Misc: 8 Course Lute (L.K.Brown)

  10. #8
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    S.W. Wisconsin
    Posts
    4,273

    Default Re: 1927 Gibson A-Jr #84192 Question

    If there is tension on the strings I would loosen them so it does not due anymore damage. The crack is not that big of a deal and I agree the brace is most likely loose. Once fixed it shouldn't hurt the sound.
    THE WORLD IS A BETTER PLACE JUST FOR YOUR SMILE!

  11. The following members say thank you to pops1 for this post:


  12. #9

    Default Re: 1927 Gibson A-Jr #84192 Question

    One 'lesson' from this thread. This is the sort of equation involved in any vintage instrument purchase, when buying in un-restored... original... under the bed... long unused, condition. Really good repairs, are fairly expensive, and those expenses can't always be recouped in resale. That doesn't mean it's a bad idea, or even a bad value. There is a lot to be said about an instrument that's in good solid repair, and set up the way the owner likes it! It's a feeling that a lot of pros require, but a lot of casual pickers can't justify paying for.

    AND, there's something satisfying about making repair and set up decisions on an instrument that has not had a long history of previous repairs and mods.

    My first mandolin was a teens Gibson A that I paid about a few hundred dollars for in the '80s. It was in pretty good shape, but flaking Sheraton brown finish, action high with non-adjustable one piece bridge, tuning and intonation problems... It turned out that the fret slotting was about as bad as any point in Gibson's history, and Brooklyn legendary luthier Bob Jones replaced the fretboard and tuners. Adjusted the bridge and nut. Left the finish alone. And I got 20 years of fun out of it. Sold it to a friend for say, $1K - which is NO profit at all, given inflation and missed investment opportunity. $500 invested in the DOW in say 1982 would have returned several thousands after 20 years.

    All in all... I'd do it again! ;-)
    BradKlein
    Senior Producer, Twangbox
    Twangbox Videos

  13. The following members say thank you to BradKlein for this post:


  14. #10
    Registered User CWRoyds's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    San Rafael, Ca
    Posts
    488

    Default Re: 1927 Gibson A-Jr #84192 Question

    Yup, the cost of the instrument as is, the cost to fix it, and the end value of the fixed instrument is all good to know.
    If I fixed it for myself, the final value after fixing was only to make sure I wouldn’t be putting in far more than the cost of one that was in good shape to begin with. I have never sold and instrument, so if I buy it, I’m keeping it. I do however like to know what everything might cost and end value so that I can tell my friend, so that he can sell it if I am not interested.

    I will tell him the real costs and value, and we will go from there.
    I think I am less interested unless the initial buy cost is very low.
    I don’t really need it. I just kinda want it.
    I don’t mind putting a few hundred into it, but if I can buy an unbroken one for about the same price, I might pass.

    If he doesn’t sell it to me, I will put it in the classifieds for him here.
    Mandolins: Northfield 5-Bar Artist Model "Old Dog", J Bovier F5 Special, Gibson A-00 (1940)
    Fiddles: 1920s Strad copy, 1930s Strad copy, Liu Xi T20, Liu Xi T19+ Dark.
    Guitars: Taylor 514c (1995), Gibson Southern Jumbo (1940s), Gibson L-48 (1940s), Les Paul Custom (1978), Fender Strat (Black/RWFB) (1984), Fender Strat (Candy Apple Red/MFB) (1985).
    Sitars: Hiren Roy KP (1980s), Naskar (1970s), Naskar (1960s).
    Misc: 8 Course Lute (L.K.Brown)

  15. #11

    Default Re: 1927 Gibson A-Jr #84192 Question

    I think you are using an incorrect rationale. Rather than think of it as a good mandolin needing repair, I would think of it as a broken mandolin, which is probably what the owner thinks. Thank him for thinking of your mandolin hobby, and shift the conversation away from money and offer to take him and his wife to dinner or give them a gift card for a restaurant they like. In all honesty, I don't think there is a fortune to be made on it, once the repair cost is figured into the equation, BUT you might end up with a nice sounding mandolin for your trouble!

    Guys who work at body shops all drive BMW's, Corvettes, and Lincolns that they bought as "junk" cars, and then were able to repair, FWIW...

  16. The following members say thank you to Jeff Mando for this post:


  17. #12
    Registered User CWRoyds's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    San Rafael, Ca
    Posts
    488

    Default Re: 1927 Gibson A-Jr #84192 Question

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Mando View Post
    I think you are using an incorrect rationale. Rather than think of it as a good mandolin needing repair, I would think of it as a broken mandolin, which is probably what the owner thinks. Thank him for thinking of your mandolin hobby, and shift the conversation away from money and offer to take him and his wife to dinner or give them a gift card for a restaurant they like. In all honesty, I don't think there is a fortune to be made on it, once the repair cost is figured into the equation, BUT you might end up with a nice sounding mandolin for your trouble!

    Guys who work at body shops all drive BMW's, Corvettes, and Lincolns that they bought as "junk" cars, and then were able to repair, FWIW...
    Yup, I guess my rational is that I don’t need this mandolin, but it would be fun to have. The money side, from my perspective is only what I am willing to put out to have an AJr that is playable. I don’t think of instruments in terms of resale value, as I don’t sell I struments I buy. If I shell out money, it is usually for a keeper. I collect instruments, so it is just another tool in the box.

    BUT I want this guy to get a fair deal. I certainly don’t want to short change him. My guess is that, when he finds out it is not particularly valueable and will take a bit of money and effort to get it back to playability, he might just give it to me, or at least sell for a nominal fee. He has absolutely no interest in the thing itself. It is just something he found when cleaning out his late uncle’s house. We shall she. I certainly don’t want to dump a bunch of money into a mandolin I don’t really need. If I can get it cheap and fix it up for a couple hundred, it will be worth it to me.
    Mandolins: Northfield 5-Bar Artist Model "Old Dog", J Bovier F5 Special, Gibson A-00 (1940)
    Fiddles: 1920s Strad copy, 1930s Strad copy, Liu Xi T20, Liu Xi T19+ Dark.
    Guitars: Taylor 514c (1995), Gibson Southern Jumbo (1940s), Gibson L-48 (1940s), Les Paul Custom (1978), Fender Strat (Black/RWFB) (1984), Fender Strat (Candy Apple Red/MFB) (1985).
    Sitars: Hiren Roy KP (1980s), Naskar (1970s), Naskar (1960s).
    Misc: 8 Course Lute (L.K.Brown)

  18. #13

    Default Re: 1927 Gibson A-Jr #84192 Question

    I'll be interested to see what you're quoted for the repair. What condition are the frets in?
    Silverangel A
    Michael Kelly LSFTB
    Arches F style kit
    1913 Gibson A-1

  19. #14
    Registered User CWRoyds's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    San Rafael, Ca
    Posts
    488

    Default Re: 1927 Gibson A-Jr #84192 Question

    Quote Originally Posted by Br1ck View Post
    I'll be interested to see what you're quoted for the repair. What condition are the frets in?
    I dont know the detailed condition yet, as i have only seen these two pictures so far. I asked for better shots of the top, back, and sides, as I need to know if the seams are good etc. I will report back when I know more.

    They sure are a cute model. I like the stripped down look and the brown color.
    I think if I owned an oval hole, it would probably be an AJr
    Mandolins: Northfield 5-Bar Artist Model "Old Dog", J Bovier F5 Special, Gibson A-00 (1940)
    Fiddles: 1920s Strad copy, 1930s Strad copy, Liu Xi T20, Liu Xi T19+ Dark.
    Guitars: Taylor 514c (1995), Gibson Southern Jumbo (1940s), Gibson L-48 (1940s), Les Paul Custom (1978), Fender Strat (Black/RWFB) (1984), Fender Strat (Candy Apple Red/MFB) (1985).
    Sitars: Hiren Roy KP (1980s), Naskar (1970s), Naskar (1960s).
    Misc: 8 Course Lute (L.K.Brown)

  20. #15

    Default Re: 1927 Gibson A-Jr #84192 Question

    There have been a few come through Gryphon in the last few months and I played most of them. A year or so ago they had a clean A2Z that was special and a head above the rest. But the paddle heads pretty much all had the same tone, be they A-2s or A-4s. Different only as any instruments will vary. I think the higher the model, the better kept they were. The A-1 I just bought has lived a sheltered life.
    Silverangel A
    Michael Kelly LSFTB
    Arches F style kit
    1913 Gibson A-1

  21. The following members say thank you to Br1ck for this post:


  22. #16
    Registered User Eric Platt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    St. Paul, MN
    Posts
    512

    Default Re: 1927 Gibson A-Jr #84192 Question

    I paid around $1k for my '27 (or '29) A-Jr. With a couple of repairs and at least a overspray from a very reputable vintage instrument dealer. He paid a bit less for it at a show, but didn't have to put any repairs into it. I swapped out the original tuners for Rubners because all the buttons were either starting to crack or would be soon.

    Mine is very bass heavy (or tubby sounding). I like it a lot and it's very comfortable to play. I switch between it and my 1910 A as my main performance mandolins. Depending on mood.
    1910 Gibson A, 1929 Gibson A Jr., 2018 Eastman MDO-305, 2018 Big Muddy MW-0, 2015 Ashbury Style E OM
    http://ericplatt.weebly.com/
    https://www.facebook.com/LauluAika/

  23. The following members say thank you to Eric Platt for this post:


  24. #17

    Default Re: 1927 Gibson A-Jr #84192 Question

    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Platt View Post
    I paid around $1k for my '27 (or '29) A-Jr. With a couple of repairs and at least a overspray from a very reputable vintage instrument dealer. He paid a bit less for it at a show, but didn't have to put any repairs into it. I swapped out the original tuners for Rubners because all the buttons were either starting to crack or would be soon.

    Mine is very bass heavy (or tubby sounding). I like it a lot and it's very comfortable to play. I switch between it and my 1910 A as my main performance mandolins. Depending on mood.
    Do you find them very different from each other? What kind of music do you play?

    I'm just a week in from owning my A-1, and still getting used to what it can do. Fiddle tune for sure, and I just tend to like old things.
    Silverangel A
    Michael Kelly LSFTB
    Arches F style kit
    1913 Gibson A-1

  25. The following members say thank you to Br1ck for this post:


  26. #18
    Registered User Eric Platt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    St. Paul, MN
    Posts
    512

    Default Re: 1927 Gibson A-Jr #84192 Question

    Quote Originally Posted by Br1ck View Post
    Do you find them very different from each other? What kind of music do you play?

    I'm just a week in from owning my A-1, and still getting used to what it can do. Fiddle tune for sure, and I just tend to like old things.
    Yes. The Jr. has a bit more bass and the A is more even sounding. Just took the A in to see if they can fit a Brekke bridge.

    Mostly play Scandinavian folk music on it, with an emphasis on Finnish music. Although I do take it to old time jams now. Trying to not have everyone think of me as just a guitar player.

    Both can keep up with either an accordion or open back banjo player.
    1910 Gibson A, 1929 Gibson A Jr., 2018 Eastman MDO-305, 2018 Big Muddy MW-0, 2015 Ashbury Style E OM
    http://ericplatt.weebly.com/
    https://www.facebook.com/LauluAika/

  27. #19

    Default Re: 1927 Gibson A-Jr #84192 Question

    Keep showing up with a mandolin and a mandolin player is what you'll be.

    Show up with a bass fiddle and you will never play another instrument in a band againLOL.
    Silverangel A
    Michael Kelly LSFTB
    Arches F style kit
    1913 Gibson A-1

  28. The following members say thank you to Br1ck for this post:


  29. #20

    Default Re: 1927 Gibson A-Jr #84192 Question

    Quote Originally Posted by Br1ck View Post
    ...Show up with a bass fiddle and you will never play another instrument in a band againLOL.
    +1000

    Spot on, because you'll be making minimum $100 a night every time the bass leaves the house, as many nights a weeks as you want!

  30. #21
    Adrian Minarovic
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Banska Bystrica, Slovakia, Europe
    Posts
    2,125

    Default Re: 1927 Gibson A-Jr #84192 Question

    From the OP pics I think the mandolin top is quite deformed under bridge. The crack looks like a wave, not smooth arch at all... the bridge is nonoriginal and some kind of block is under bass side that pushes the broken top down. Repair would probably involve arch correction as well, IMO.

    something like this: http://www.frets.com/FretsPages/Luth...ndotopsag.html
    Adrian

  31. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to HoGo For This Useful Post:


  32. #22
    Mando accumulator allenhopkins's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Rochester NY 14610
    Posts
    15,419

    Default Re: 1927 Gibson A-Jr #84192 Question

    Quote Originally Posted by grandcanyonminstrel View Post
    +1000

    Spot on, because you'll be making minimum $100 a night every time the bass leaves the house, as many nights a weeks as you want!
    Yeah, but the chiropractic will eat up all that cash...

    I swear I'll never keep a bass fiddle in my basement again. Just lugging it up and down stairs makes me want to switch to the Kala bass ukulele.
    Allen Hopkins
    Gibsn: '54 F5 3pt F2 A-N Custm K1 m'cello
    Natl Triolian Dobro mando
    Victoria b-back Merrill alumnm b-back
    H-O mandolinetto
    Stradolin Vega banjolin
    Sobell'dola Washburn b-back'dola
    Eastmn: 615'dola 805 m'cello
    Flatiron 3K OM

  33. The following members say thank you to allenhopkins for this post:


  34. #23
    Registered User Eric Platt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    St. Paul, MN
    Posts
    512

    Default Re: 1927 Gibson A-Jr #84192 Question

    Ha! Through college I was mainly a bass player. Would have kept up with it except hand problems caused me to give up all playing for about 4 years.

    If I were to get another bass, it would be an Eminence. Our band has one and it's a great instrument. And a whole lot easier to lug around than a full doghouse.

    Folks are talking about that crack. Not sure if it's now deformed (although it could be). Looks like it's a cheap bridge with 2 small feet. I'd take the pressure of the strings and see what happens first.

    Oh, and in both my current bands, I am considered a mandolin (or octave mandolin) player. Both are encouraging me to focus on that rather than guitar.
    1910 Gibson A, 1929 Gibson A Jr., 2018 Eastman MDO-305, 2018 Big Muddy MW-0, 2015 Ashbury Style E OM
    http://ericplatt.weebly.com/
    https://www.facebook.com/LauluAika/

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •