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Thread: Tenor Banjo Rebuild

  1. #26
    Registered User Mike Snyder's Avatar
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    Default Re: Tenor Banjo Rebuild

    That bridge is very, very similar to my own which I created for my 17 fret Orpheum. I’d be interested to learn how you came up with that one. Very long full contact bridges are not that common on tenor banjo. Or perhaps I’m mistaken. Mine came about as I sought a plunky sound very different from a typical ITM sort of bright loud banjo tone.
    Mike Snyder

  2. #27
    Mando-Accumulator Jim Garber's Avatar
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    Default Re: Tenor Banjo Rebuild

    They made excellent drums as well.
    Jim

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    1923 Gibson A2 black snakehead -- Brentrup A4C -- 1915 Frank Merwin Ashley violin -- Huss & Dalton DS -- 1937 Gibson L-Century -- 1939 Gibson L-00 -- ca. 1890s Fairbanks Senator Banjo -- ca. 1923 Vega Style M tenor banjo -- Gibson TB-Junior

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  4. #28

    Default Re: Tenor Banjo Rebuild

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Snyder View Post
    That bridge is very, very similar to my own which I created for my 17 fret Orpheum. I’d be interested to learn how you came up with that one. Very long full contact bridges are not that common on tenor banjo. Or perhaps I’m mistaken. Mine came about as I sought a plunky sound very different from a typical ITM sort of bright loud banjo tone.
    I used to import a great deal of fossil mastodon material from Siberia. I have about 1500 pounds of that fossil material in my shop. I know how to work it quickly and efficiently. This bridge is a result of that whole series of events.

    My luthier called and said he needed a bridge so he could go to the next step. He gave me some rough dimensions. I picked up a piece of mastodon that was in one of my bins, cut it the length, width and thickness, then shapes the ends on my sander. Then shaped a concave profile into the sides to narrow the top.

    It was finish-sanded and polished. The whole thing took maybe 15 minutes.

    One consideration I had in making it was to put as much contact area on the head as possible to spread the downward forces to minimize potential tearing of the head because it is so thin.

    The only other thought was to make as much of the bridge make contact with the head for good transmission of vibration.

    I’m getting ready to make another bridge for this tenor that will be 1” wide at the base. Same considerations apply.

    I’m no expert, really a novice. The shape of the bridge came about more for practical considerations than trying to anticipate a particular sound.

    Thank you for asking!

  5. #29
    Mando-Accumulator Jim Garber's Avatar
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    Default Re: Tenor Banjo Rebuild

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Snyder View Post
    That bridge is very, very similar to my own which I created for my 17 fret Orpheum. Iíd be interested to learn how you came up with that one. Very long full contact bridges are not that common on tenor banjo. Or perhaps Iím mistaken. Mine came about as I sought a plunky sound very different from a typical ITM sort of bright loud banjo tone.
    Quote Originally Posted by Rootes View Post
    I used to import a great deal of fossil mastodon material from Siberia. I have about 1500 pounds of that fossil material in my shop. I know how to work it quickly and efficiently. This bridge is a result of that whole series of events.

    My luthier called and said he needed a bridge so he could go to the next step. He gave me some rough dimensions. I picked up a piece of mastodon that was in one of my bins, cut it the length, width and thickness, then shapes the ends on my sander. Then shaped a concave profile into the sides to narrow the top.
    That is very similar to the bone bridges the Brazilians use on their bandolims. Yikes, 1500 pounds of fossilized ivory? Can you make a coffee table from one of those pieces?

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Jim

    My Stream on Soundcloud
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    Playing lately:
    1923 Gibson A2 black snakehead -- Brentrup A4C -- 1915 Frank Merwin Ashley violin -- Huss & Dalton DS -- 1937 Gibson L-Century -- 1939 Gibson L-00 -- ca. 1890s Fairbanks Senator Banjo -- ca. 1923 Vega Style M tenor banjo -- Gibson TB-Junior

  6. #30
    Registered User Mike Snyder's Avatar
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    Default Re: Tenor Banjo Rebuild

    Thanks for the bridge information, Rootes. Mine is maple from a large old bakery workbench.
    Mike Snyder

  7. #31
    Registered User Ivan Kelsall's Avatar
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    Default Re: Tenor Banjo Rebuild

    From Jim Garber - " They made excellent drums as well.". They did indeed Jim - well reminded,& currently owned by guess who ? - Gibson !!.. Gene Krupa & Buddy Rich both played 'Signature model' Slingerland drums,
    Ivan
    Weber F-5 'Fern'.
    Lebeda F-5 "Special".
    Stelling Bellflower BANJO
    Tokai - 'Tele-alike'.
    Ellis DeLuxe "A" style.

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