Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 26 to 50 of 73

Thread: Pac Rim instruments vs American made instruments ??

  1. #26

    Default Re: Pac Rim instruments vs American made instruments ??

    Certainly the Northfield brand had dispelled any argument that good mandolins can't be made in China. You can get the Chnese to build you anything you are willing to pay for.

    I believe the Masterbuilt Kentuckys to be very good, not quite Northfield good, but that is probably more of a business decision rather than an inability to deliver a better mandolin. I'd love to see the sales figures. Kentucky and Eastman build what they do by design to fill a market level where the majority of instruments are sold. They have decided not to fight head to head with Gibson, Weber, or Collings where they would have to fight our ingrained bias.

    Northfield has decided to do that, figuring there was a niche market to fill for those of us wanting better, but not able to afford it.

    I have found all Eastman and Kentucky instruments I've played, which have all been new off the wall, to be lacking richness in the low end. I'm willing to pay dearly because of that. But the Pac Rim is turning out insanely good product for the price, and I enjoyed my Eastman while I had it. It got me hooked.

    What do I play the most? My Michael Kelly 199.00 blow out special. Why? Because I turned it into a decent player from the horrible mandolin it was, and I leave it out within arm's reach because I'm not concerned about dinging it up, and it has sounded better over time. So much so I'm not going to discount how good a Pac Rim instrument could sound over time. I would still council anyone to buy and be happy playing the best instrument you can afford, or maybe a bit more.
    Silverangel Econo
    Michael Kelly LSFTB

  2. The following members say thank you to Br1ck for this post:


  3. #27
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    The Great Northwest
    Posts
    30

    Default Re: Pac Rim instruments vs American made instruments ??

    My one, and only, mandolin is a Breedlove of Pac-Rim origin. Since I am still figuring this out, I am happy with it.

    Of the four guitars I own, one is Pac-Rim that I bought for my travels in a trailer. It was to be cheap and able to suffer abuse. It accomplished those objectives AND it plays very nicely. So, Pac-Rim that sounds nice is certainly worthy of consideration.

    I still prefer USA made but for a beater, I can adapt.

  4. #28
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    1,907

    Default Re: Pac Rim instruments vs American made instruments ??

    The Asian built instruments put a good sounding, good playing instrument into someone's hands at a price that is more than reasonable. If money was no object, most everything I really want is built in Europe.
    Steve

  5. #29
    Mandolin Friendly Mark Gunter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Near Abilene, Texas
    Posts
    2,300

    Default Re: Pac Rim instruments vs American made instruments ??

    This topic usually gets a lot of discussion, because it's of interest to all musicians to one degree or another. I haven't read every word, but what I have read in this one is about like all the others: Interesting for sure.

    I have one thought to put down in this one, excuse me if it's been said in other words and I missed it: Lutherie did not begin, and doesn't end, with English-speaking people.
    Technique, theory and fun, fun, fun. I love playing, studying and sharing MUSIC.
    "Life is short. Play hard." - AlanN
    ------------------------
    HEY! The Cafe has Social Groups, check 'em out. I'm in these groups:
    Newbies Social Group | The Song-A-Week Social
    The Woodshed Study Group | Collings Mandolins | MandoCymru
    - Advice For Mandolin Beginners
    - YouTube Stuff

  6. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Mark Gunter For This Useful Post:


  7. #30
    Lurkist dhergert's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    IE CA USA
    Posts
    789

    Default Re: Pac Rim instruments vs American made instruments ??

    I've sort of stayed out of this discussion so far because I haven't spent much time with Eastman or Kentucky or The Loar... I've purchased an Eastman once, 2nd hand, for a friend, and he enjoyed playing it until he got a better Eastman and gave the one I provided to another friend, who still enjoys it.

    Eastman and Kentucky and sometimes The Loar are the brands most recommended here for people looking for an affordable/startup instrument. A lot of the time when Pac Rim is brought up, they are the mandolins people are talking about.

    That said, I do have a fair amount of experience with Michael Kelly, having purchased one for myself and three for others during the $199 blowout that Br1ck discussed, and having done a complete setup of three of these instruments. From what I've been able to find out, these were originally just under $1K list price instruments with a case. They were Korean and Chinese made solid wood "hand-carved" F-style models, having gone through at least one revision before they closed production and went into their final market at $199.

    As I was looking over and setting up these MK mandolins, I did find some of the inconsistencies that people have talked about with Pac Rim mandolins. These were slight same-model differences that probably happened as a result of different factory locations that had different focus and QC standards. Most of these differences are not drop-dead differences, but are noticeable to people who work closely -- like in setup -- with multiple instruments.

    So I'm guessing these MK mandolins compare with the lower cost solid wood "hand-carved" F-style mandolins by Kentucky and The Loar, although from what I've seen of Eastman, their models in this quality range are probably more solidly made, or at least more carefully finished. But again, I've never spent serious time with Kentucky, Eastman or The Loar.

    What I can say is from a tone and volume standpoint, these MK Pac Rim mandolins started out loud and a little too bright, but after a good setup and a new set of FT strings really started sounding good to my ears and started playing extremely well... Meaning, sounding and playing close to comparable to my 2002 Gibson F-9, which compares well with other low-end Gibsons that I've played.

    And the MK models opened my eyes to features I eventually wanted and had added to my F-9, specifically wider ("banjo-width") Evo-gold frets, a C-profile neck instead of V-profile neck, and a French-polished speed neck. I consider these to be great improvements for my F-9, and thus I already consider the MK contribution has been one of great value to me.

    Of my two active playing mandolins, my MK has become my backup/travel instrument, which was my original intent in getting it. It isn't the first mandolin I grab at home now, but I routinely bring it to festivals and camp-outs along with my F-9, to use the MK as conditions get challenging. It sounds very good and plays very well; I feel lucky to have it and I would play it without hesitation for gigs, and it is definitely the mandolin I'll fly with whenever I fly with an instrument.
    -- Don

    "It is a lot more fun to make music than it is to argue about it."

    2002
    Gibson F-9
    2016 "$199.00 solid F style" MKLFSTB
    1975 Suzuki taterbug
    (plus an assortment of banjos, dobros, guitars and other noisemakers)

  8. #31
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Kernersville, NC
    Posts
    2,225
    Blog Entries
    3

    Default Re: Pac Rim instruments vs American made instruments ??

    PR mandolins are awesome for getting young (and old) folks into music for the first time. Everyone I know started on one. It would be a smaller mandolin world without them. I would guess that there would be less custom builders if affordable instruments weren't the gateway infection source for MAS.

  9. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Mark Wilson For This Useful Post:


  10. #32
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    4,721

    Default Re: Pac Rim instruments vs American made instruments ??

    Although a lot of the PacRim instruments come from China they have American ties with Americans overseeing a lot of the finished work and using specs that long ago were from Gibson F-5`s....A lot of the "tricks" to making a good sounding mandolin have been passed on to the Asian builders and I have never seen or heard of a mandolin that cared <Removed by Moderator> As stated in another post "The Chinese can build just about anything you want" Much like Japan did after WW-II...My Ky. KM-956 puts a lot of US made instruments to shame but again that is a matter of taste and I do like to buy American when I can but thing that are made in the US are getting less and less every day...Compare as many mandolins as you can and go by what your ear and eyes tell you.....

    Willie
    Last edited by MikeEdgerton; Dec-26-2017 at 2:19pm. Reason: Language offensive to some forum members

  11. #33
    coprolite mandroid's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Outer Spiral Arm, of Galaxy, NW Oregon.
    Posts
    15,337

    Default Re: Pac Rim instruments vs American made instruments ??

    yea, you get all the fancy decoration features for less in a imported mandolin..

    A friend with a Job at the local music store went to the Eastman US warehouse, and played a dozen, or so,

    then picking the one he liked the sound of best, said 'ship this one'.




    ...
    writing about music
    is like dancing,
    about architecture

  12. #34
    Registered User Ivan Kelsall's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Manchester - Lancashire - NW England
    Posts
    13,262

    Default Re: Pac Rim instruments vs American made instruments ??

    I've often thought that it's not so much a 'bias' in our reasoning about Pac-rim instruments,it's maybe about 'why' would Asian factories build instruments that they themselves don't play ?. I mean,why would the Chinese build banjos & mandolins if they don't play them themselves ?. The reason is,to earn money, & the reason that they were asked to build them in the first instance,isn't just about cheaper labour,it's because the companies such as SAGA etc.realised that the Pac-rim folks have a long history of producing superb craftsmanship - they just weren't banjos & mandolins !!. I wonder what the reaction would be in say,China, to goods that were intrinsically Chinese made in the USA (or 'wherever') exported to China ?. I can imagine discussions re.US made chop sticks & Woks against Chinese ones.

    I remember reading on the Banjo Hangout about the first production run of Gold Star banjos made in China. Greg Rich (ex.Gibson) helped set the production line up along with Scott Zimmerman (''Desert Rose'' banjos), & he supervised the production in the early days. He mentioned that some of the first 'pot' assemblies came down the line a tad 'wonky'. He took the guys to one side,showed 'em 'how',& that was the end of 'wonky pots',they came down perfect every time after that. Greg did mention the amazing willingnesss of the Chinese guys to learn. My own Chinese built Gold Star was superb in every detail & sounded as good as it looked,
    IvanClick image for larger version. 

Name:	Gold Star 3.jpg 
Views:	16 
Size:	172.2 KB 
ID:	163428Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Gold Star GF-100.jpg 
Views:	17 
Size:	228.0 KB 
ID:	163429Click image for larger version. 

Name:	TW1000-SR 5.JPG 
Views:	19 
Size:	315.1 KB 
ID:	163430 My 'once owned' Chinese Gold Star banjo & my Korean built Tanglewood guitar - both now sold.
    Weber F-5 'Fern'.
    Lebeda F-5 "Special".
    Stelling Bellflower BANJO
    Tokai - 'Tele-alike'.
    Ellis DeLuxe "A" style.

  13. The following members say thank you to Ivan Kelsall for this post:


  14. #35
    Registered User Eric Platt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    St. Paul, MN
    Posts
    408

    Default Re: Pac Rim instruments vs American made instruments ??

    Quote Originally Posted by Ivan Kelsall View Post
    (Snip) I wonder what the reaction would be in say,China, to goods that were intrinsically Chinese made in the USA (or 'wherever') exported to China ?. I can imagine discussions re.US made chop sticks & Woks against Chinese ones..(Snip)
    We tried that in Minnesota once. Set up a chopstick factory to sell to the Japanese. It was a failure. They were not interested in buying them from the US.
    2018 Eastman MDO-305 - Octave mandolin
    2018 Big Muddy MW-0
    1929 (or 27) Gibson A. Jr
    Californian - Pacific Music Supply oval hole (Strad-O-Lin genre)
    ca. 2000 Breedlove Cascade
    http://ericplatt.weebly.com/
    https://www.facebook.com/LauluAika/

  15. The following members say thank you to Eric Platt for this post:


  16. #36
    Scroll Lock Austin Bob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Austin, Tx - some call it heaven
    Posts
    995

    Default Re: Pac Rim instruments vs American made instruments ??

    Quote Originally Posted by Ivan Kelsall View Post
    I've often thought that it's not so much a 'bias' in our reasoning about Pac-rim instruments,it's maybe about 'why' would Asian factories build instruments that they themselves don't play ?.
    I dunno Ivan, there was a lot of junk musical instruments out there in the 70's trying to meet the demand from all the baby boomers wanna be rock stars like myself. Those old memories die hard, and I think that's why they are still prevalent from folks 45 and older.

    The younger generations don't seem to have those collective memories, they grew up with electronics and shoes made all over the globe.
    A quarter tone flat and a half a beat behind.

  17. #37
    Registered User Russ Donahue's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    693

    Default Re: Pac Rim instruments vs American made instruments ??

    Quote Originally Posted by Austin Bob View Post
    I dunno Ivan, there was a lot of junk musical instruments out there in the 70's trying to meet the demand from all the baby boomers wanna be rock stars like myself. Those old memories die hard, and I think that's why they are still prevalent from folks 45 and older.

    The younger generations don't seem to have those collective memories, they grew up with electronics and shoes made all over the globe.
    I understand what you are saying, but like today, those 70's instruments weren't all bad. For many years my main guitar was a Martin D28 lawsuit clone with the Tama emblem that had been hand built in what eventually became an Ibanez shop in Japan. The big "T" on the headstock confused the heck out of folks, who looked at the instrument and thought it was a Martin. After HEARING it, they were even more confused. I reluctantly parted with it a few years ago and was pleasantly surprised to be paid a bit more than 3x what I paid for it new. Some companies build to a price point, some build to a quality metric, some use both. The result has always been a wide range of instruments in both price and quality. Even here in the 1920s through the 1960s we had Gibsons, Martins, Guilds, Gretschs, Kays, Regals, Harmonies, and Silvertones, etc.
    One watch by night, one watch by day...if you get confused, just listen to the music play.

  18. #38
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Va
    Posts
    2,069

    Default Re: Pac Rim instruments vs American made instruments ??

    I think Austin Bob has said it. I don't think twice if I find out a mandolin I think is great was made by a man in Nashville or Atlanta, or Bristol. I kind of do a double take if I find out it was made by someone on Japan or China. I'm not racist, I just bought a Kentucky 900 and think it's great. It's just that, as Austin Bob said, old habits die hard. In my mind I know that there is no reason any nationally can't make a great instrument. But for me in my formative years Asia instrument meant junk. Old habits die hard!

  19. #39
    Moderator MikeEdgerton's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    40.191N -74.2W
    Posts
    20,503

    Default Re: Pac Rim instruments vs American made instruments ??

    The real Lawsuit story can be found here.
    "Bargain instruments are no bargains if you can't play them". These are the words of J. Garber.

  20. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to MikeEdgerton For This Useful Post:


  21. #40
    Mando accumulator allenhopkins's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Rochester NY 14610
    Posts
    15,095

    Default Re: Pac Rim instruments vs American made instruments ??

    Quote Originally Posted by Ivan Kelsall View Post
    ...that was the end of 'wonky pots'...
    Nah, he's still pickin' with the Bluegrass Unmentionables.
    Allen Hopkins
    Gibsn: '54 F5 3pt F2 A-N Custm K1 m'cello
    Natl Triolian Dobro mando
    Victoria b-back Merrill alumnm b-back
    H-O mandolinetto
    Stradolin Vega banjolin
    Sobell'dola Washburn b-back'dola
    Eastmn: 615'dola 805 m'cello
    Flatiron 3K OM

  22. The following members say thank you to allenhopkins for this post:


  23. #41
    Mandolin Friendly Mark Gunter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Near Abilene, Texas
    Posts
    2,300

    Default Re: Pac Rim instruments vs American made instruments ??

    My 70's Epiphone and my 70's Takamine were both great guitars.
    Technique, theory and fun, fun, fun. I love playing, studying and sharing MUSIC.
    "Life is short. Play hard." - AlanN
    ------------------------
    HEY! The Cafe has Social Groups, check 'em out. I'm in these groups:
    Newbies Social Group | The Song-A-Week Social
    The Woodshed Study Group | Collings Mandolins | MandoCymru
    - Advice For Mandolin Beginners
    - YouTube Stuff

  24. #42
    Registered User Louise NM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    New Mexico
    Posts
    216

    Default Re: Pac Rim instruments vs American made instruments ??

    There is always a need for reasonably priced, entry-level workshop instruments. With the economics involved, Asia is going to be the source. A quick look at Gibson's website shows current models ranging from $5K to $60K. Most of the other companies are gone, or out of the mandolin business. Lyon & Healy makes a fine harp, Martin still makes guitars, Kay is long gone.

    If you're looking to start mandolin, shelling out for an entry-level Collings, for example, just isn't financially feasible for most of us. The United States is home to terrific small shops and individual makers, but they are not a realistic source for the quantity and price point needed for entry-level instruments.

    Eastman, in their 25 years in business, has worked closely with master instrument builders to make stringed instruments of all sorts for the US market. Saga, makers of Kentucky, Trinity College, and other labels has supplied entry-level and step-up instruments for 40 years now. Asia is chock full of talented craftsmen, capable of making anything. The better companies have parlayed that into a steady source of instruments for the US market.

    Don't get me wrong, there are plenty of truly terrible mandolin-shaped objects (MSOs) coming out of Asia, too. Which means that the phrase "Pac Rim instruments" doesn't mean much. Country of origin means much less than the specs used for the instruments, and the quality of the materials and workmanship that went into making them.

    "European car" can refer to a Trabant, a Mercedes, a Yugo, or a Bugatti.
    1988 Reno mandolin, Trinity College mandola
    one viola, a couple of violins, a whole bunch of bows, various recorders, a flute, a guitar, and what is possibly the world's worst oboe

  25. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Louise NM For This Useful Post:


  26. #43
    Registered User Ivan Kelsall's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Manchester - Lancashire - NW England
    Posts
    13,262

    Default Re: Pac Rim instruments vs American made instruments ??

    From Austin Bob - ".....there was a lot of junk musical instruments out there in the 70's ..". A lot of it from Gibson i believe !!.

    The lousy quality of Gibson instruments at the time, was one of the initial reasons for the original Japanese made ''Gold Star'' banjos produced for SAGA,& the opinion re. the '70's Gibson mandolins is ''less than good'' from all i've read on here. It hasn't prevented Gibson from 'coming back' & building high quality sought after instruments once more.

    I fully understand your remark Bob,& i'm old enough to remember the poor quality goods coming in from 'Asia',but look where those countries are now !. Look around your home at all your elec.appliances & look where they were made - if the US is anything like the UK,they're mostly made in China & the quality & reliability is first class. Going back to the mid 1970's,the quantity of ''Japanese built'' Hi-Fi equipment sold to the ''West'' was collosal. It sold so well because the quality was excellent. Many Japanese companies then sub-contracted such work out to Taiwan (to name one country),because they too were perfectly capable of building to a very high standard - & so it still goes on.

    Its time to forget 'where' things are made,& to judge them solely on their 'quality' - regardless (IMHO),& reading the article to which Mike Edgerton gives a link (post # 39), explains a lot re.'why'
    some Asia guitar brands became so popular,
    Ivan
    Weber F-5 'Fern'.
    Lebeda F-5 "Special".
    Stelling Bellflower BANJO
    Tokai - 'Tele-alike'.
    Ellis DeLuxe "A" style.

  27. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Ivan Kelsall For This Useful Post:


  28. #44
    Gibson F5L Gibson A5L
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    1,814
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: Pac Rim instruments vs American made instruments ??

    Well .... when you look at the big picture the 70's instruments were mostly not well made from Martin to Gibson to Fender ..Yes some were fine but too many weren't. All were ramping up production numbers and quality control took a big hit. At that time small instrument makers were also starting up. Taylor in Lemon Grove Ca Stuart Mossman in Winfield Kansas.... I am sure you folks can name more .... Santa Cruz .... Lo Prinzi .... Randy Wood and Steven Gilchrist were getting experience in Nashville late the 70's or early 80's .... Takamine fired up at that time along with Ibanez and Sumi started making Kentucky instruments...Times of great changes ... R/
    I love hanging out with mandolin nerds . . . . . Thanks peeps ...

  29. #45
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Marcellus, NY
    Posts
    213

    Default Re: Pac Rim instruments vs American made instruments ??

    I find that my Eastman 615 not unlike my Japanese and Taiwanese trumpets. Built well, play well, very precise and even in tone throughout it’s range, but not very warm sounding. This is not a bad thing, just different.

  30. #46
    Mando accumulator allenhopkins's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Rochester NY 14610
    Posts
    15,095

    Default Re: Pac Rim instruments vs American made instruments ??

    Quote Originally Posted by UsuallyPickin View Post
    Well .... when you look at the big picture the 70's instruments were mostly not well made from Martin to Gibson to Fender ..Yes some were fine but too many weren't... R/
    Well, Martin introduced the HD-28 in 1976 or '77, and it was a big improvement in bracing design and sound over the D-28's that preceded it. Gibson started building F-5L's in 1978, changing direction from the generally disliked early-'70's models. Both companies, to some extent, "got the message" that they needed to step up their games, now that quality imports were becoming available.

    Also, they couldn't help being aware of the widespread opinion that older Gibson and Martin acoustic instruments were clearly better-made and better-sounding than their current '70's products. When a 25-year old used instrument is selling at a premium over a new one, something's going on that bodes no good for the manufacturer.

    There was a spate of well-made Asian instruments showing up at that time: Alvarez F-model mandolins, Takamine Martin-clone guitars, Gold Star banjos, and others. In some ways, it was the first phase of the current global market in quality acoustic instruments, the benefits of which we are enjoying today (I guess most of us are enjoying them!). Compared to when I got mandolin-involved in 1970, there's a hugely wider spectrum of makes, models and prices available. Doubt that many who are starting to play mandolin now, realize that 45 years ago there were many fewer choices for the beginner or the pro musician.

    No change is without its casualties, of course, and i do wish Harmony and Kay and the other US builders of entry-level instruments, could have survived the "Asian invasion." I play quite a few Regal instruments, and there were surely some great firms building affordable instruments here; not so any more, with perhaps a few small-scale exceptions.

    It's a microcosm of the overall change in world trade, and we deal with it as we must. Some companies adapt and survive, others don't. The discerning mandolin buyer, though, is IMHO miles better off now than before imported quality instruments showed up.
    Allen Hopkins
    Gibsn: '54 F5 3pt F2 A-N Custm K1 m'cello
    Natl Triolian Dobro mando
    Victoria b-back Merrill alumnm b-back
    H-O mandolinetto
    Stradolin Vega banjolin
    Sobell'dola Washburn b-back'dola
    Eastmn: 615'dola 805 m'cello
    Flatiron 3K OM

  31. #47
    Mandolin Friendly Mark Gunter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Near Abilene, Texas
    Posts
    2,300

    Default Re: Pac Rim instruments vs American made instruments ??

    Quote Originally Posted by allenhopkins View Post
    There was a spate of well-made Asian instruments showing up at that time: Alvarez F-model mandolins, Takamine Martin-clone guitars, Gold Star banjos, and others.
    I bought a Takamine back then when they first hit Baton Rouge, based purely on the sound I heard while playing the guitars at the music store. It was billed as a "jazz cutaway", and was the first cut away acoustic guitar I'd ever seen. I considered it a great import guitar.

    Likewise, I loved the 70's Epiphone I saved for:



    And the 60's Epiphone which was my dad's guitar:



    Sure, a lot of people turn their noses up at 70's import instruments - but many of us couldn't afford Gibsons and Martins, and some of the imports were of good enough quality that several pros used them.
    Technique, theory and fun, fun, fun. I love playing, studying and sharing MUSIC.
    "Life is short. Play hard." - AlanN
    ------------------------
    HEY! The Cafe has Social Groups, check 'em out. I'm in these groups:
    Newbies Social Group | The Song-A-Week Social
    The Woodshed Study Group | Collings Mandolins | MandoCymru
    - Advice For Mandolin Beginners
    - YouTube Stuff

  32. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Mark Gunter For This Useful Post:


  33. #48
    Moderator MikeEdgerton's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    40.191N -74.2W
    Posts
    20,503

    Default Re: Pac Rim instruments vs American made instruments ??

    I still have my first one. I don't have the second through a hard to determine number. I have no idea why this one lasted and the others didn't

    Decided to add some current pictures. I lent it out many years ago to a young friend that wanted to learn to play. It came back with a nasty broken headstock. In doing the repair I changed out the tuners to Grover's. I didn't buy it with a case so I got this one many years later. I just picked it up for the first time in about 20 years and the pickguard has come loose. Thankfully it didn't hold on and crack the top. It actually sounds pretty good.

    Basically this was the first playable guitar I owned. Prior to this I was playing Harmony's. They didn't have mojo back then. They were simply awful instruments.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	scan0040.jpg 
Views:	23 
Size:	372.5 KB 
ID:	163554   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_4003.JPG 
Views:	19 
Size:	620.8 KB 
ID:	163555   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_4004.JPG 
Views:	28 
Size:	644.7 KB 
ID:	163556  

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_4005.JPG 
Views:	19 
Size:	730.5 KB 
ID:	163557  
    "Bargain instruments are no bargains if you can't play them". These are the words of J. Garber.

  34. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to MikeEdgerton For This Useful Post:


  35. #49

    Default Re: Pac Rim instruments vs American made instruments ??

    Those Takamines and Yamahas back in the day were the Eastmans and Kentuckys of today. The first wave of well built reasonably priced good sounding imported instruments.
    Silverangel Econo
    Michael Kelly LSFTB

  36. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Br1ck For This Useful Post:


  37. #50
    Registered User almeriastrings's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Almeria, Spain
    Posts
    5,255
    Blog Entries
    3

    Default Re: Pac Rim instruments vs American made instruments ??

    Back in the mid-70's I co-owned a music store in the UK, and those 'Red Label' Yamaha's were a revelation. We had them on the wall next to the then-current Gibson models... and the Gibson guitars were a fantastic selling point: for the Yamaha's! The FG-160 was spectacularly good for the day. A lightly built, nice sounding box. They basically killed off the Harmony, Eko and Hagstrom and several other then-leading lower priced brands dead within a very few years. Some of these have been semi-revived lately, but in different forms than they were back then... overbuilt and heavy as lead. The old EKO's were boat anchors, and I think made from marine grade ply! Sounded like it too.
    Gibson F5 'Harvey' Fern, Gibson F5 'Derrington' Fern
    Distressed Silverangel F 'Esmerelda' aka 'Maxx'
    Northfield Big Mon #127
    Ellis F5 Special #288
    '39 & '45 D-18's, 1950 D-28.

  38. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to almeriastrings For This Useful Post:


Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •