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Thread: What the

  1. #51
    This Kid Needs Practice Bill Clements's Avatar
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    Default Re: What the


    I liked it, too!
    "Music is the only noise for which one is obliged to pay." ~ Alexander Dumas

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  3. #52
    Mando-Accumulator Jim Garber's Avatar
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    Default Re: What the

    Whew! We got a great cross-section on tastes in music here on the Cafť! I love this discussion and all your opinions.

    There is very little music that I can't stand and my playing is in the traditional arena for the most part. However, anything that has the fire and energy like the playing of those folks is fine with me. I have been to concerts with all levels of both virtuosity and experimentation and tho this music seems out there believe me there is some genres that might be harder to sit through.

    Hey, I grew up musically listening to Andy Statman play way out licks within a New York "bluegrass" context, and have gone to some pretty out there jazz concerts as well as meditatibe world music, so I can handle Thile and Lage and company. I would love to hear Andy play with them one of these days and see what comes out. I am all for it. Knock yourself out, you guys.
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  5. #53
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    Default Re: What the

    The first time my dad heard Bella Fleck his comment was ďsounds like he canít do the same thing twiceĒ thatís what I think of this. Itís called improvising? To me improvising is being able to play a piece you donít really know off the cuff so to speak. This is so far from any fundamentals that no one or any one could play it off the cuff. Seems like what ever one played would go with it as good as anything else. They are speaking to each other musically? Must be in the unknown tongue.

  6. #54
    Registered User Pete Summers's Avatar
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    Default Re: What the

    Count me in. I love it. But then, I am and have always been a jazz fan. Not so much a bluegrass fan, though I like it in small doses. I could listen to this kind of jazz all evening.

    Anything new is going to get criticism, of course, until people get used to it. Critics of the day were not kind to Mozart either, and they absolutely roasted Scott Joplin and Ragtime (which, the story goes, was a term used by a New York music critic who said it was like "tearing the music into rags," -- just as "impressionist" was intended as slam in the art world. Ironically, both terms became highly marketable names for a new genre. And both of which seem kinda old fashioned styles nowadays. Time moves on).

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  8. #55

    Default Re: What the

    Bravo!! I've known these musical phenomenons since they were kids and much appreciate their continuing contributions to the world of acoustic string music. I also greatly applaud this broad discussion about MUSIC and not equipment.

    Happy Holidaze as well to all mandolin lovers everywhere!

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  10. #56
    Registered User Timbofood's Avatar
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    Default Re: What the

    If everyone liked the same things, oh, what a dull world we would live in.
    Is this something I would want to listen to on a daily basis? No. Now, would it have been fun to have seen live? Oh yes, absolutely!
    Timothy F. Lewis
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  12. #57
    Moderator JEStanek's Avatar
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    Default Re: What the

    So I finally watched this. I really enjoyed the interplay between the boys and the band. I'm a big Coltrane fan and love Andy Statman's chops. This was good jazzy fun for me and I enjoyed the trading of ideas. It's cool not to like other styles if they don't float yer boat.

    Also, I loved Chris's mowhawk. He was like Wes from the Road Warrior with a suit and mandolin. A demon of the wasteland! Ha!

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  13. #58
    Gummy Bears and Scotch BrianWilliam's Avatar
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    Default Re: What the

    That's some good bluegrass

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  15. #59
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    Default Re: What the

    Isn't it funny how music can offend the senses, as if that particular song was made just for you, just to specifically offend you.

    I just find it kinda funny.

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  17. #60
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    Default Re: What the

    Quote Originally Posted by Pete Summers View Post
    Count me in. I love it. But then, I am and have always been a jazz fan. Not so much a bluegrass fan, though I like it in small doses. I could listen to this kind of jazz all evening.

    Anything new is going to get criticism, of course, until people get used to it. Critics of the day were not kind to Mozart either, and they absolutely roasted Scott Joplin and Ragtime (which, the story goes, was a term used by a New York music critic who said it was like "tearing the music into rags," -- just as "impressionist" was intended as slam in the art world. Ironically, both terms became highly marketable names for a new genre. And both of which seem kinda old fashioned styles nowadays. Time moves on).
    There is a less wholesome theory on the origin of the term "ragtime"... I won't repeat it here.

    Anyway, I liked the piece. Reminded me of Billy Bang's stuff (the jazz violinist).
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  19. #61
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    Default Re: What the

    Hard to believe a guy as dignified - some might say "starchy" - as Scott Joplin would have used any term with vulgar implications to describe his music.

    Interesting convergence - John Stark, Joplin's publisher, grew up on a farm in .... Bean Blossom, Indiana!

  20. #62
    Registered User Eric Platt's Avatar
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    Default Re: What the

    Removed post. Irrelevant blather on my part.
    Last edited by Eric Platt; Dec-09-2017 at 7:55pm. Reason: Not proper for the list
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  21. #63
    Registered User Tom Haywood's Avatar
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    Default Re: What the

    I really enjoyed watching and hearing this jam. A jam like this allows musicians to explore where they are and to find a few things that they never tried before or thought they could do. The thrill of that is palpable, and you can see it in this video. Having played in southern rock jam bands many, many years ago, I know that very many musicians lack the courage to step out of their comfort zone in this way, unless jazz is their comfort zone. And to do it with acoustical string instruments is extraordinary. I also know that this kind of magic doesn't always work, and when it does work it is mostly enjoyed by the players rather than by the audience.

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  23. #64

    Default Re: What the

    I saw that it was a PHC clip and called my wife over to view with me. Halfway through it she walked off and said I have laundry to do. At the end of it I said to myself(because my wife left the room)Wow that was awesome but what was the point./
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  24. #65
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    Default Re: What the

    I wonder if I would have enjoyed it if I had only listened and not watched it. I love the interplay between the musicians and I think the visual aspect of it adds a lot. I can't say I'd want to hear this again, but I did make it all the way through and was fairly entranced by it. This basically strikes me as the acoustic guitar and mandolin version of free jazz, which I've never enjoyed, despite being fully aware of the immense skill and talent possessed by folks likes Coltrane, Ornette Coleman, Sonny Rollins, etc... It's more bearable for me with an acoustic guitarist and mandolinist, but at the end of the day it sounds like highly technical noise to me.

  25. #66
    Registered User mandocaster's Avatar
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    Fabulous. It sounds like the audience was really enjoying it.
    I think the logic that if I donít like particular music, then itís pointless and nobody should like it is difficult to justify. It may come as a shock, but many people despise bluegrass and wonder why anyone would want to play it.
    Also, I wouldnít bet much money that these guys are unable to play this music again.

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  27. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by mandocaster View Post
    Fabulous. It sounds like the audience was really enjoying it.
    I think the logic that if I don’t like particular music, then it’s pointless and nobody should like it is difficult to justify. It may come as a shock, but many people despise bluegrass and wonder why anyone would want to play it.
    Also, I wouldn’t bet much money that these guys are unable to play this music again.
    I loved it myself.....mandocaster pretty much nailed my thoughts on it (as well as Monroe and bluegrass). If you don't like something...just turn it off.

  28. #68
    Mando-Accumulator Jim Garber's Avatar
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    Default Re: What the

    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Orr View Post
    This basically strikes me as the acoustic guitar and mandolin version of free jazz, which I've never enjoyed, despite being fully aware of the immense skill and talent possessed by folks likes Coltrane, Ornette Coleman, Sonny Rollins, etc...
    There is a big difference between Coltrane/Rollins and Ornette Coleman. Coleman is really out there (probably closer to Thile/Lage) whereas Coltrane/Rollins are more melodic even in their offbeat ways Ornette Coleman was the start, more or less, of a trend to what I called "screaming saxophone" music.

    Hey, 1940s swing and bebop had some people holding their ears, too. Stravinsky's Rite of Spring "caused a sensation and a near-riot in the audience."
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  30. #69
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    Default Re: What the

    This thread is living proof of the old saw, “you can’t please everyone.”

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  32. #70
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    Default Re: What the

    I admire Thile--love his classical playing in particular--and thought this was excellent.

    I can see how some would find it pretty baffling, and it made me think of my own little epiphany about jazz.

    When I was first finding my way in music in the late 60s, I started off in the folk world, got into finger-picking country blues pretty heavily, played in a bluegrass band for a while, and then drifted into rock and county, played for a few years in bar bands in upstate New York.

    I was intrigued by jazz, especially Miles Davis (circa "In a Silent Way"), but found a lot of it really hard to make sense of. By chance, I got hold of a reissue LP of some early Charlie Parker, and one of the tracks was a live recording of him and his combo playing "White Christmas" on a Christmas Morning radio show as a listener request. Unlike nearly all the jazz I'd listened to, I already knew the melody well, and as I listened to it over and over, the whole concept of jazz improvisation suddenly became clear to me, and I've enjoyed jazz ever since.

    YMMV, of course, but give this a listen and see if you have the same reaction. (It was a rare record back then, but naturally is instantly available online today):


    And--happy holidays!

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  34. #71
    Registered User mandocaster's Avatar
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    Dawg has spoken. In all the discussion I didnít see it. Thank you so much, sir! You are a big part of the almost four decades of my love for the mandolin.

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  36. #72
    Mandolin Friendly Mark Gunter's Avatar
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    Default Re: What the

    Kind of a strange thread - I've only read the first page so far, but there's been talk of hairstyles, bluegrass ... what the h*ll does that have to do with this crazy fantastic performance? That kind of talk ain't no part of nuthin' ...

    OK, free speech and all that, and thank God we enjoy that freedom.

    Wow, what a performance. These guys blew my socks off with that stuff.
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  37. #73
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    Default Re: What the

    It's interesting that none of the people who disliked the video said that people who liked it should not express their opinion ...

  38. #74
    Registered User dang's Avatar
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    Default Re: What the

    Quote Originally Posted by Willie Poole View Post
    Bet you a dime that they can`t play it a 2nd time exactly like they did this 1st time...Just a lot of "scaleing" to me...Not too bad to listen to...ONCE...

    Willie
    Quote Originally Posted by mandocaster View Post
    ....Also, I wouldn’t bet much money that these guys are unable to play this music again.
    He only bet a dime!

    I liked it as much the second time as I did the first time, I would have loved to be there live!

    Kinda reminds me of a thread where we were discussing instrumental tunes, (unless you are the Dawg) it can be hard to keep the audiences attention through a couple of instrumental songs back to back. Maybe the “hook” isn’t there to grab attention... either you love the fast picking virtuosic playing or you don’t?
    I should be pickin' rather than postin'

  39. #75
    Registered User Ivan Kelsall's Avatar
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    Default Re: What the

    I've often wondered if our musical background & what we've listened to over the years, 'sets' our taste in music in such a way as to make anything outside our 'musical listening experiences' unacceptable ?. I like Dixieland Jazz,but i don't like the Dave Brubek style of 'modern jazz' - that does not mean that i don't appreciate the musicianship, just not the way they arrange the notes !.

    I absolutely love Jazz guitar - all styles / all players, & once had aspirations to play Jazz on guitar. I soon discovered that i don't have a ''Jazzy mind'' as far as getting it out onto the instrument. It's the same on mandolin. I can listen to a picker such as Alan Bibey & indeed Mr Grisman himself, & be bowled over by the playing. Now i can play a few tricky tunes on mandolin,but my 'mando-mind' ain't like ABs or DG's . I've had the ''David Grisman Quartet'' LP since it came out in 1977 (didn't play mandolin then), & the first few bars of EMD is about as far as i can get on any of the tunes. I've often wondered if, having played 'straight' Scruggs style banjo for 50 + years with as much of Earl's ''adherence to the melody line'' as i could muster,has 'set' the way my 'musical melodly mind' works = i can't think outside the box & thus,my appreciation for those who can,just ain't there ?.

    Hell fire ! - i feel really depressed now !!,
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