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Thread: BAS(s)

  1. #51
    Registered User red7flag's Avatar
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    Default Re: BAS(s)

    As I am getting older, we is becoming more important than I. I really love playing "in the back of the band". There is a synergy with the drummer (he is experienced and set a great groove). Between the rhythm guitar player, drums and bass we set the pocket for the band. This provides the foundation for the the solo instruments and the vocals to shine. They just play or sing to the groove and magic seems to happen. As many have noted a very solid band all in the groove will almost always be more enjoyable to listen to than a band of all stars fighting for control. There is no I in WE. Since playing in the Praise Band and moving to bass, even though my bass playing is elementary,, our band sound has greatly improved. The drummer, who was a touring drummer says he enjoys playing with us lot more with a bass player. We help each other, but I depend on him and the experienced rhythm guitar player to set and keep me in the groove.
    Tony Huber
    1930 Martin Style C #14783
    2011 Mowry GOM
    2013 Hester F4 #31
    2014 Ellis F5 #322
    2017 Collings MT2-O #3666
    2017 Nyberg Mandola #172

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  3. #52
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    Default Re: BAS(s)

    Interesting thread.

    I'm coming to mandolin from forty-odd years of being primarily a bass player, with lots of guitar along the way. Mandolin is a recent occurence (~1 year), and I'm really enjoying it. Previous to the mandolin, I was very aware that playing bass improves my guitar playing, and playing guitar improves my bass playing. Now I have the mandolin to add to that formula, and it's really fun to watch how the learning is happening.

    But I agree that bassists are born, and while it's relatively easy to become competent on the bass (the most important factor IMO being a good sense of time, as in a drummer), really amazing bassists do think about song structure in a different way than one of the lead instruments. In a traditional combo, the bass bridges the gap between rhythm and melody, and requires an equal awareness of both.

    I still am part of a three-piece (guitar/bass/drums) roadhouse/rock/blues band, and what is really cool about it is that the three of us each have a sonic space we're responsible for. That requires listening, awareness of what the others are doing and not stomping all over another's space. It also requires the discipline to not go off noodling.

    On the other hand, it also makes it very apparent if you crank out a clam...

    If you listen carefully to a great bassist, what may seem at first like a boring, endless 1-5 bass line has all sorts of little fills and melodic character, it's just that they are placed where they don't get in the way of either the other players or the song, as a whole. Unless you're Stanley Clarke, that is; and last time I saw him, he actually had another bassist in his band, which allowed him the freedom to play his as a lead instrument.

    I've already been noticing the role of the upright bass in bluegrass, which is a really important one; and I'm already tempted to give that a whirl.

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  5. #53
    Registered User zedmando's Avatar
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    Default Re: BAS(s)

    Quote Originally Posted by red7flag View Post
    The pastor of our church and leader of the band asked me to play bass in the band. Never played bass. Did not know the strings are the same as the lower 4 of a guitar an octave lower. Started from scratch. Bought a cheep Epiphone EBO. Played with others for the first time last Sunday and played in the band in front of the church right after that. No mistakes and felt really comfortable "in the back of the band". The next day I was reading review on Talkingbass (MC's bass counterpart) and the next day pulled the trigger on an Lakland Skyline Hollowbody bass... Different instrument same process (lusting) and result (buying). Thought you guys might be amusded that MAS can so easily become BAS(s). They refer to it as BGAC Bass Guitar Acquisition Syndrome. I like BAS(s) better.
    it's all GAS to me (Gear Acquisition Syndrome)---makes it easier that way.

    I play bass as well--played bass much longer than mandolin--but started playing fretless bass about a year before I started mandolin.
    Also play guitar.

    I have played guitar & bass in church--maybe one day mandolin.
    I have done it as church jam sessions though.

    And I played mandolin in a band at our church talent show.

    It's all fun to me though...
    Would it save you a lot of time if I just gave up and went mad now?

  6. #54

    Default Re: BAS(s)

    Quote Originally Posted by foldedpath View Post
    ...If I had money to burn, I'd get one of those neat NS electric uprights just to have in the house and fool around on. Maybe one day...
    I've used EUBs as 'practice' instruments (formerly a working bassist). There are affordable instruments like the Ergo and are as portable as a long tent bag.

    In several decades of playing double bass, transporting an upright never, ever bothered me (can't say the same for drums); it's a different instrument than EUB and very much worth the effort. DB is my favorite acoustic instrument, it's the king of strings.

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  8. #55
    coprolite mandroid's Avatar
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    Default Re: BAS(s)

    Mando bass is like a bass guitar standing upright.. fretted neck ..

    4ths tuning makes sense with a long scale , EADG ascending ..
    writing about music
    is like dancing,
    about architecture

  9. #56
    Registered User red7flag's Avatar
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    Default Re: BAS(s)

    Just want to add that playing bass has helped my mandolin technique. Right hand timing has improved by making more effort to focus on each note and how it connects to the previous and next note. Improved focus on the rhythm of the song and the role of each note in accentuated that rhythm. Also, playing bass has gotten me more focused on scales and arpeggios and how they fit in one's playing. How adding a 7th to an arpeggio can introduce the 5th chord. Funny how playing in the "back of the band" can help in the front too. Also, helps playing in the studio. Have noticed my playing when heard back after recording is much smoother.
    Tony Huber
    1930 Martin Style C #14783
    2011 Mowry GOM
    2013 Hester F4 #31
    2014 Ellis F5 #322
    2017 Collings MT2-O #3666
    2017 Nyberg Mandola #172

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