Results 1 to 23 of 23

Thread: Moving to Denver

  1. #1
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    9

    Default Moving to Denver

    As the title indicates, I'll be heading out west soon, and giving up the thick heat of the southeast. Didn't have to concern myself with humidify my instruments before. Looking for recommendations on implements for instrument care. In addition, please feel free to PM me or post here on places to play or watch. I will likely have other off topic things to PM residents about. Thanks much. adam

  2. The following members say thank you to ago for this post:


  3. #2
    Registered User rdodger99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Englewood, Colorado
    Posts
    29

    Default Re: Moving to Denver

    I'm live in Denver and keep my instruments in their cases with case humidifiers except in the summer, now, when I can reach 45% in my music area (humidifier running). Colorado is tough on instruments
    Rich
    2016 Blonde Pava Pro #197

  4. The following members say thank you to rdodger99 for this post:

    ago 

  5. #3
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Purple Mountains Majesty
    Posts
    9

    Default Re: Moving to Denver

    I also keep mine in the case with a humidifier when I'm not playing.

    Never had any problems so far, but I did have an issue with a guitar top when I (by which i mean my teenage daughter ) didn't keep up with refilling the case humidifier.

  6. The following members say thank you to FrontRangeMando for this post:

    ago 

  7. #4
    Mando accumulator allenhopkins's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Rochester NY 14610
    Posts
    14,269

    Default Re: Moving to Denver

    Denver's dry -- no big news there. Proper humidification, and watch for signs of drying out.
    Allen Hopkins
    Gibsn: '54 F5 3pt F2 A-N Custm K1 m'cello
    Natl Triolian Dobro mando
    Victoria b-back Merrill alumnm b-back
    H-O mandolinetto
    Stradolin Vega banjolin
    Sobell'dola Washburn b-back'dola
    Eastmn: 615'dola 805 m'cello
    Flatiron 3K OM

  8. The following members say thank you to allenhopkins for this post:

    ago 

  9. #5
    Registered User ColoradoMando's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Boulder, Colorado
    Posts
    22

    Default Re: Moving to Denver

    We recommend the oasis mandolin case humidifiers at the store I work at in Boulder. Check out the Boulder Pickers
    and Denver Pickers Facebook pages for picks and local bluegrass shows. Welcome!

  10. The following members say thank you to ColoradoMando for this post:

    ago 

  11. #6
    Registered User colorado_al's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Boulder, CO & Chesterfield, MO
    Posts
    1,171

    Default Re: Moving to Denver

    Welcome to Colorado! I use 2 dampits in each case. One threaded into the body of the mandolin through the F hole, or into the oval hole and one in the area of the headstock. I wet them every 2-3 days depending on weather. Make sure they are not soaking when you put them in. You want to humidify, not cause water damage.
    These are the ones that I use:
    https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B0009JPR8C/
    2016 Franzke A5 Custom w/Rubner tuners & James Tailpiece & McClung Armrest
    2011 Collings MT Custom w/Rubner tuners & McClung Armrest
    2014 JBovier A5T w/Grover 308 tuners & McClung Armrest
    2015 Blueridge BR-40TCE Tenor to OM conversion
    1999 Tacoma M2E
    2011 Big Muddy MM-8 MINI-MO
    2005 Malagoli solid-body electric cavaquinho

  12. The following members say thank you to colorado_al for this post:

    ago 

  13. #7

    Default Re: Moving to Denver

    Your instruments, may, in a couple of years, hit what i call equilibrium, ie be ok with colorado humidity. They may not. Bit slowing the change is critical.

    I use a cellulose songe, pretty damp but not sopping, in modestly perforated (hole punched) zip locks. They work well, last almost a week or more, and my cases read 45%-+ max, using this method. I put it under the headtock, not in the guitar body. I have had no issues, and the case's gauage is kept near the heel area, fwiw.

    I haved used dampits, and they last 2 days, and sometimes drip, even when shaken out.

    Imho, it is the transition that is the biggest problem. A very slow, like 2 years, change to our humidity well be advisable.

    While our humdity changes a good deal, it seems lately to be close to 40%, from my occasional glances at room hygrometers. Keeping the instrument cased and with dampener will smooth and slow the changes.


    Doing this currently with a D41 special i bought from alabama several months ago. No issues.

    Get the $10 cigar hygrometer from amazon and a couple of cheap room versions-these willl help a lot.

  14. The following members say thank you to stevedenver for this post:

    ago 

  15. #8
    String-Bending Heretic mandocrucian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    2,816

    Default Re: Moving to Denver


  16. #9
    Registered User Al Trujillo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Southern Colorado
    Posts
    364

    Default Re: Moving to Denver



    Welcome to the mad house!

  17. The following members say thank you to Al Trujillo for this post:

    ago 

  18. #10
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Boulder, CO
    Posts
    418

    Default Re: Moving to Denver

    Welcome to Colorado! I live in Lafayette and work in Boulder. Lot's of good picking around here. I can go to a jam any night of the week.

    I like to keep my mandolin out of the case on a stand. I have a couple hygrometers around the house and pay attention to humidity. I have a "whole house" humidifier. Not one that hooks to the furnace, but a large evaporative humidifier like this one: https://www.amazon.com/EP9-800-Whole...ive+humidifier

    I just watch the humidity and run the humidifier when it gets low (which is pretty much all winter). I don't worry about keeping it perfect. I think of it as "taking the edge off". If it's above 30-35% I'm guessing it's fine. I know some folks say it has to be 45% (or whatever the perfect number is), but I think as long as you can keep it from getting really dry (it'll get down to 10% around here) it'll be fine.

  19. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Stevo75 For This Useful Post:

    agoTobin 

  20. #11
    Registered User Mandobart's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Washington State
    Posts
    2,554

    Default Re: Moving to Denver

    FWIW - I grew up in northern NM at 7000' above sea level. Higher drier and colder than Dember. I never thought twice about humidification for my violin or guitar while living there. My Grandpa's 1880's German trade fiddle spent about 140 years there with no humidification. No issues whatsoever. Now that I know better I monitor and adjust the humidity in my Eastern WA home. IMHO this is something that makes a good OCD/neurotic meter - how much an individual obsesses over humdification. There's more voodoo than science in most of the discussions I've read.

  21. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Mandobart For This Useful Post:

    agoLouise NM 

  22. #12
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    9

    Default Re: Moving to Denver

    Thanks for all the welcomes and thoughts. I look forward to getting there, finding a place to live temporarily, and getting better at playing.

  23. #13
    Registered User NursingDaBlues's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Colorado/Louisiana
    Posts
    165

    Default Re: Moving to Denver

    About four years ago I moved from Louisiana to Colorado. So with respect to changes in environment, you’ll be encountering a situation similar to mine.

    Here’s what I found to be helpful:

    1. Not all, but many newer homes and condos that have central air/heat may have an integrated humidification system. Some older homes may have upgraded to include a humidification system. Some of these integrated humidification systems are quite good (if you remember to utilize it); others aren’t. So any humidification system needs to be assessed to determine whether it will provide dependable and sufficient humidity for your needs. Apartments usually will not have a humidification system. If you have an integrated humidification system that provides dependable and sufficient humidification, then you won’t really need any ancillary humidification products.

    2. Many older homes will have an evaporative cooler (AKA swamp cooler) that can over-humidify your instruments when used continuously during summer months.

    3. Should you not have an integrated humidification system or you have an inadequate system, you’ll need some other means to humidify your instruments. The quantity and type of instruments will play a role.
    a. If you have three or fewer instruments, then the Oasis in-case humidifier might fit your needs. It does a reasonable job. You’ll need to remember to re-fill these humidifiers probably weekly. Occasionally in extended extremely dry conditions, two (or maybe three) Oasis humidifiers may be necessary for guitar-sized instruments. However, these humidifiers will not last forever. The Oais HumiGel crystals do require occasional replenishing (replacement crystals can be purchased) and the bladder can develop leaks if allowed to dry out completely. The last time I checked, the Oasis humidifiers were around $20; replacement HumiGel crystals were around $8.
    b. If you have four or more instruments, you might be better served getting a room or large-area humidifier. I turned a small room off our patio that isn’t hooked into the home humidification system into our music room. I’ve used an AirCare MA0800 Evaporative Humidifier in that area for about two years with good, dependable results. It has a built in hygrometer with automatic on/off to maintain the humidity you desire. The hygrometer is not entirely accurate but with a little trial and error you adjust the setting to maintain an appropriate humidity. I just checked Amazon and they sell for around $80.
    c. If you have a piano you’ll need a room humidifier.
    d. If you have an accordion or concertina, or just about any instrument with wood components, you’ll need some way of humidifying these instruments.
    e. Be sure to humidify your cases. Fabric linings, foam, and wood in instrument cases take a lot of humidification if they’ve been allowed to dry out. If dry, they’ll take it from an instrument during transport.
    f. Also, solid wood furniture (especially antique wood furniture) can be susceptible to Colorado’s low humidity. It will shrink, it can crack, joints can separate, and glue can dry out. So be sure to consider humidification for those items.
    g. Get a hygrometer. You can find a fairly inexpensive one at Target or Wal-Mart that can proved reasonable approximations for target humidity. Humidor hygrometers that you can get at tobacco/cigar stores are great for in-case use.

    4. Be sure to consider your move. If you’re moving yourself and expect the move to take a couple of weeks, then be sure to allow the instruments to acclimate to new temperatures and environment before unpacking and playing. If you’re depending on a moving company with an indefinite time for storage, try to come up with another way to move the instruments with less time in a warehouse or unfriendly conditions.

    Hope this helps. Good luck.
    Just a simple Louisiana boy trying to understand Colorado.

  24. The following members say thank you to NursingDaBlues for this post:

    ago 

  25. #14
    Registered User NursingDaBlues's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Colorado/Louisiana
    Posts
    165

    Default Re: Moving to Denver

    Of course, all this assumes you'll be fortunate enough to find a place to live in Denver. The housing market is currently very, very tight and very, very expensive. Single family home inventory is low and bidding wars are common occurrences on homes that do come up for sale. And, reportedly, apartments usually have long waiting lists. So, good luck.
    Just a simple Louisiana boy trying to understand Colorado.

  26. #15
    Iberian mandolin roberto's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Spain
    Posts
    298

    Default Re: Moving to Denver


  27. #16
    Gummy Bears and Scotch BrianWilliam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Summit County Colorado
    Posts
    615

    Default Re: Moving to Denver

    Good advice here. Not to be a sour puss but start putting some dollars aside for repairs. The first winter is the toughest.

    Micah at the Arvada picking parlor did a great job planing/re-fretting the neck of my #1. At least I did the damage to the frets

    CO is awesome! A fine choice

  28. #17
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Boulder, CO
    Posts
    418

    Default Re: Moving to Denver


  29. #18
    Registered User Louise NM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    New Mexico
    Posts
    33

    Default Re: Moving to Denver

    As a desert-dweller, I'm not a fan of humidification. If your instrument never, ever leaves its humidified case or room, have at it. But, if you're going outside to play on the porch on a day with <10% humidity, or headed to a gig in an overheated room, that carefully humidified instrument won't know what to do with itself when it comes out of the case. I think the constant swings are harder on it than just getting used to the ambient humidity.

    Moving from the relatively swampy South, you will, as others have said, want to make sure your instruments have a chance to acclimate slowly. Keep a careful eye on them, and find yourself a friendly neighborhood instrument tech before you actually need one.

    Don't get too wound up about hygrometers. Both my violin and viola cases have them built in. They both happily register 60% humidity morning, noon, and night, all year long. (I don't think the humidity in this area ever hits 60%—not even in a rainstorm! As for my mandolin, it was made in town, and seems to have spent all its life here. It wouldn't know what to do with humidity.
    1988 Reno mandolin
    one viola, a couple of violins, a whole bunch of bows, various recorders, a flute, a guitar, and what is possibly the world's worst oboe

  30. #19
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    9

    Default Re: Moving to Denver

    Thanks for the additional thoughts, and music. Any suggestions on the preferred techs in the area?

    Luckily I have a few months to find temp housing, and a little longer to find a place for the family (thankfully my wonderful wife enjoys house hunting). I am accustomed to living outside the big city, but having to be in downtown and bad traffic. Parts of my OW are heading back closer to its birthplace, but I doubt it will remember it

  31. #20
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Boulder, CO
    Posts
    418

    Default Re: Moving to Denver

    They do good work at the Old Town Pickin Parlor in Arvada.

  32. #21
    Registered User StevenS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Santa Clarita, CA
    Posts
    1,756

    Default Re: Moving to Denver

    The key is to buy instruments built in a similar climate . . . say, for example, the California high desert.

    Steve
    Steve Sorensen
    Sorensen Mandolin & Guitar Co.
    www.sorensenstrings.com
    "On the Bench Today" updates on Facebook

  33. #22
    Registered User NursingDaBlues's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Colorado/Louisiana
    Posts
    165

    Default Re: Moving to Denver

    Quote Originally Posted by ago View Post
    Any suggestions on the preferred techs in the area?
    You'll find several luthiers in the Denver/Boulder/Colorado Springs/Ft. Collins corridor. And as expected, you'll receive a wide-number of opinions based on individual preferences.

    While I don't live in Denver, it's worthwhile for me to make the 2 1/2 hour trek out of the mountains to use Victor Guitar for repairs, set-ups, and general maintenance on ALL of my stringed instruments. Edward, the owner, does all of my work, and does an impeccable job. I tried a few other luthiers in the Denver metro, but none came close to Edward's capabilities. He took the time to understand my and my wife's style of play, our individual preferences, and our instruments. He offers recommendations and the rationale behind those recommendations.

    His repairs are immaculate. For example, I had an old bowlback that developed a gaping top crack after moving to Colorado; I don't know how he did it, but you can only see the barest hint that there was a crack and only if you knew where it was. Edward has done quite a few repairs for me on various instruments, and I've always been well pleased with the results. If you give him a deadline, he sticks to it. If he gives you an estimate, he sticks to it. He stays in contact with you if there are any other issues that he might spot. BUT, he doesn't fish for additional business or dollars; he just tells you to be aware of something or if a repair for something needs to be addressed immediately or down the road.

    Because, he's very good, he's busy; very busy. But he always manages to give individualized attention. While I consider his prices to be reasonable, others may think he can be pricey. But, for me he's well worth the drive and whatever he may charge. And in some cases, he's thrown in an additional repair without charge. And, as an additional bit of information, he builds some exquisite instruments as well. My wife and I have three of his guitars custom built for us.

    I have no financial interest. I just highly recommend his services.
    https://www.victorguitar.com/
    Just a simple Louisiana boy trying to understand Colorado.

  34. #23
    Registered User Al Trujillo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Southern Colorado
    Posts
    364

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •