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Thread: Samuel Adelstein Mandolin Memories - 1901

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    Administrator Mandolin Cafe's Avatar
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    Default Samuel Adelstein Mandolin Memories - 1901

    The following pages are from the Martin Guitar Co. archives from a 1901 and I thought worth sharing here since the information has historic importance. One of our members shared these with me and I'm going to let him explain them if he wishes.

    Samuel Adelstein Mandolin Memories - 1901

    Samuel Adelstein Mandolin Memories - 1901

    Samuel Adelstein Mandolin Memories - 1901

    Samuel Adelstein Mandolin Memories - 1901

    Samuel Adelstein Mandolin Memories - 1901

    Samuel Adelstein Mandolin Memories - 1901

    Samuel Adelstein Mandolin Memories - 1901

    Samuel Adelstein Mandolin Memories - 1901

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    Registered User DavidKOS's Avatar
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    Default Re: Samuel Adelstein Mandolin Memories - 1901

    Fascinating...even the pictures of the sanxian, yueqin, tar, and other "mandolin" instruments.

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    Mando-Accumulator Jim Garber's Avatar
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    Default Re: Samuel Adelstein Mandolin Memories - 1901

    Thanks, Scott for posting these pages.

    There was a modern reprint of this small book published in Italy in 1999 by Ugo Orlandi with translations into Italian and French. I don't recall where I bought it. Maybe Elderly had it at one time or I may have ordered it from Ugo or Carlo Aonzo.

    There was a short, humorous discussion about this book in 2004. Alex Timmerman mentioned the reprint. I have a feeling it is no longer in print.

    Michael Reichenbach has posted some info on Adelstein here.
    Jim

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    Full Grown and Cussin' brunello97's Avatar
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    Default Re: Samuel Adelstein Mandolin Memories - 1901

    Great stuff, Scott. Thanks, as well, for posting. A very enjoyable, informative read.

    It always comes as a surprise to be reminded of just how short Raffaele Calace really was. Not that there's anything wrong with that.

    Mick
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    Mandolin tragic Graham McDonald's Avatar
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    Default Re: Samuel Adelstein Mandolin Memories - 1901

    This was, I think, serialised in The Cadenza around 1901. I am away for a couple of weeks, but can check when I get back home, though I suspect the book is likely to be of a better quality printing that the magazine.

    (Five minutes later) Just noticed that opposite the first page, with the red graphic, it mentions that it was first published in The Cadenza. Doh!

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    Default Re: Samuel Adelstein Mandolin Memories - 1901

    Hello all, I came across this booklet at the Martin Guitar Co. archives where I am doing research for an upcoming book and museum exhibition at the Bishop Museum scheduled for 2019. I am working on telling the story of some of Hawaii's most influential early string band troubadors, composers, multi-instrumentalists and patriots, all of whom had a significant hand in the evolution of modern instrument design and the sound of popular American music.
    The Honolulu Opera house was adjacent to the Iolani Palace and was a thriving setting for many local performers as well as internationally touring musicians passing through Honolulu, the crossroads of the Pacific. Musical reviews of the late 19th century into the early 20th century included traveling minstrel shows, european classical chamber music, Opera singers, members of the Hawaiian Royal family, and much, much more. The musical landscape of Hawaii during these years would rival any other cosmopolitan port community in the world, and mandolin was a major player at this time, even being referred to as "Hawaiis national instrument". The celebrated Ukulele educator, promoter and world traveler Ernest Ka'ai led mandolin orchestras and clubs in Honolulu in the late 1800s. Kaai toured the west coast as a pre-teen mandolin virtuoso, and went on to introduce New Zealand, Australia, India and China to Hawaiian music and Hula, all before 1915.

    I have a page dedicated to this continuing research project at www.krstrings.com under "Historical Research".

    Best, -Kilin

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    Default Re: Samuel Adelstein Mandolin Memories - 1901

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    Registered User Martin Jonas's Avatar
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    Default Re: Samuel Adelstein Mandolin Memories - 1901

    Quote Originally Posted by brunello97 View Post
    Great stuff, Scott. Thanks, as well, for posting. A very enjoyable, informative read.
    Indeed, and good to see that the issues that mandolin players discuss were the same over a hundred years ago as now: why do my A strings go out of tune so much quicker than the others, how do I adjust intonation, what's a good playable action, what are the best strings for a bowlback ... That's a good proportion of the recurring discussions here on the Cafe right there.

    Martin

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