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Thread: Washburn Model 1915

  1. #26

    Default Re: Washburn Model 1915

    Quote Originally Posted by BiggT View Post
    Again, I love the look, the sound, and play-ability of this thing! What is the value of such an instrument?
    It's valuable. I know 'cause in the grip of MAS I started looking for one. Check out the classified section here at the cafe and/or put "Washburn 1915 model" and "Lyon & Healy 1915" in your search engine and see what comes up. Send something nice to your benefactor ...

  2. #27
    Full Grown and Cussin' brunello97's Avatar
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    Default Re: Washburn Model 1915

    Spruce top / rosewood back + two point design makes this a desirable instrument.

    Threads like this always are good for raising the value / price of hitherto lesser-appreciated instruments.

    Mick
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  3. #28
    Registered User BiggT's Avatar
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    Default Re: Washburn Model 1915

    This one first caught my eye because of the two-point design.
    Before this I had only noodled around on a Kentucky F-style mando I bought for my daughter a few years back.
    While a playable instrument, the tone did not make an impression on me. It has since been traded off for a guitar.
    The smooth-sweet tone of this Washburn has me hooked.

    Are the back and sides Brazilian Rosewood?


    I wish more makers made a two-point model.
    Weber has one.
    Jonathan Mann is making some really interesting neck through two-points:

    http://www.manndolins.com/

    The neck through design is interesting.

  4. #29
    Full Grown and Cussin' brunello97's Avatar
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    Default Re: Washburn Model 1915

    Quote Originally Posted by BiggT View Post
    Are the back and sides Brazilian Rosewood?
    Well, that's what Allen quoted from Keef's book...which was citing the L+H catalog. Does the back look like rosewood? It is pretty distinguishable from mahogany--which it is likely to be if not rw.

    Besides being gorgeous, the rosewood backs on these old flatbacks make for a crisper, clearer tone, in my experience. Very desirable mandolins usually at an affordable price--at least for awhile.

    Post some photos of the back if you're not sure.

    Mick
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  6. #30
    Mando accumulator allenhopkins's Avatar
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    Default Re: Washburn Model 1915

    Quote Originally Posted by BiggT View Post
    ...Are the back and sides Brazilian Rosewood?...
    Almost all rosewood used in the US during this period came from South America. It wasn't until Brazil embargoed shipment of rosewood logs in the 1970's that we started getting our rosewood from Asia.
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  7. #31
    Registered User BiggT's Avatar
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    Default Re: Washburn Model 1915

    Quote Originally Posted by allenhopkins View Post
    Almost all rosewood used in the US during this period came from South America. It wasn't until Brazil embargoed shipment of rosewood logs in the 1970's that we started getting our rosewood from Asia.
    Thanks for the clarification Allen.

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  9. #32
    Full Grown and Cussin' brunello97's Avatar
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    Default Re: Washburn Model 1915

    Quote Originally Posted by BiggT View Post
    Thanks for the clarification Allen.
    Sorry....I thought you were trying to ID whether it was rosewood or not, not where the rosewood likely came from. Rainforests full of Brazilian rosewood were being cut down for the furniture trade, etc. in the late 18th and early 19th c. A tragedy, but at least some went into instruments still making beautiful music 100 years later.

    Mick
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  10. #33
    Registered User BiggT's Avatar
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    Default Re: Washburn Model 1915

    Quote Originally Posted by brunello97 View Post
    Sorry....I thought you were trying to ID whether it was rosewood or not, not where the rosewood likely came from. Rainforests full of Brazilian rosewood were being cut down for the furniture trade, etc. in the late 18th and early 19th c. A tragedy, but at least some went into instruments still making beautiful music 100 years later.

    Mick
    No problem Mick. It is really nice rosewood and produces such a lovely tone.
    It is hard to imagine that rosewood would be used for anything other than tone wood.

  11. #34

    Default Re: Washburn Model 1915

    FWIW, not all instruments used SOLID Brazilian rosewood, even 100 years ago. I've found quite a few old instruments veneered with Brazilian rosewood. So, it is worth a check through the sound hole and try to match up the figure patterns with the back, to make sure. Same with birdseye and flamed maple.

  12. #35
    Registered User BiggT's Avatar
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    Default Re: Washburn Model 1915

    Thanks Jeff.
    The grain matches up inside and out.

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  14. #36

    Default Re: Washburn Model 1915

    I came across a Washburn Model 1915 style 1422 and have been trying to find information but not having much luck. The serial number is 1731 and has the original label inside. Wondering about the value. Not in very good condition but liked the 2-point look.

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    Default Re: Washburn Model 1915

    I had an 1890 guitar that looked like the most beautiful Brazilian rosewood, but when you looked inside it was Mahogany. The rosewood grain was hand painted and it was good enough to fool everyone who looked at the guitar, until they looked inside.

    Just throwing that out there for the early years and things they were doing.
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  16. #38
    Moderator MikeEdgerton's Avatar
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    Default Re: Washburn Model 1915

    Quote Originally Posted by Ronhill1281 View Post
    I came across a Washburn Model 1915 style 1422 and have been trying to find information but not having much luck. The serial number is 1731 and has the original label inside. Wondering about the value. Not in very good condition but liked the 2-point look.
    Pictures are always good.
    "Bargain instruments are no bargains if you can't play them". These are the words of J. Garber.

  17. #39

    Default Re: Washburn Model 1915

    Quote Originally Posted by pops1 View Post
    I had an 1890 guitar that looked like the most beautiful Brazilian rosewood, but when you looked inside it was Mahogany. The rosewood grain was hand painted and it was good enough to fool everyone who looked at the guitar, until they looked inside.

    Just throwing that out there for the early years and things they were doing.
    I've seen that technique used on old Stella guitars and others, also. Also, rosewood veneer was commonly used on lower price instruments even 100+ years ago. Even though materials were plentiful, manufacturers were also concerned with the price point.

  18. #40
    Moderator MikeEdgerton's Avatar
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    Default Re: Washburn Model 1915

    It's called a Faux finish. Most of the Chicago builders used it one way or the other. Some were good at it, some were downright bad at it. For reference look at the 50's 60's Harmony guitars and mandolin that are supposed to look like flamed wood. That's a bad one. Some early Harmony guitars (as well as L&H and others) could get some pretty realistic looking Brazilian from a distance. Up close it wasn't as realistic and a look inside always gave it away. The funny thing was that those early guitars with the faux finish were solid not laminated wood.
    "Bargain instruments are no bargains if you can't play them". These are the words of J. Garber.

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    Default Re: Washburn Model 1915

    From what I was told about my guitar mahogany was preferred for sound, but rosewood for appearance. They painted the grain on mahogany to appear it was Brazilian rosewood. The guitar sounded great by the way.
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  20. #42
    Full Grown and Cussin' brunello97's Avatar
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    Default Re: Washburn Model 1915

    I've always liked -- even preferred -- the sound of spruce top-rosewood back mandolins viz their mahogany backed cousins. Brighter and a bit crisper tone if those completely arbitrary terms mean anything.

    Only time I could A-B it in any real way was on a couple of Martins, an A and a B and on a rash of likely Regal made Chicago flatbacks.

    The Vega / L+H Leland line are, of course, stellar examples of this. I have a Wurlitzer labeled mando from the series with a mahogany back which doesn't quite cut it like the others.

    Different storks for different forks.

    Mick
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  21. #43

    Default Re: Washburn Model 1915

    This is the only one I have.
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  22. #44
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    Default Re: Washburn Model 1915

    Quote Originally Posted by brunello97 View Post
    I've always liked -- even preferred -- the sound of spruce top-rosewood back mandolins viz their mahogany backed cousins. Brighter and a bit crisper tone if those completely arbitrary terms mean anything. Mick
    My statement was meant for guitars, not mandolins. If you think about it tho most mandolins are maple backed which would be brighter than mahogany, and much brighter than rosewood, IMHO.
    THE WORLD IS A BETTER PLACE JUST FOR YOUR SMILE!

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