Cascarda Chiara Stella

  1. Martin Jonas
    Martin Jonas
    This is an Italian renaissance dance, collected by Fabritio Caroso (1526/1535 – 1605/1620) in his seminal 1581 book "Il Ballarino". My version for two mandolins, mandocello and tenor guitar is based on a setting by Paul Butler:

    http://crab.rutgers.edu/~pbutler/music/ChiaraStella.pdf

    1915 Luigi Embergher mandolin (x2)
    Suzuki MC-815 mandocello
    Vintage Viaten tenor guitar



    Martin
  2. Christian DP
    Christian DP
    Sounds nice Martin. Do you lnow whether this piece was written for a renaissance lute? Or for a small ensemble? Anyway, the arangement by Paul Butler sounds fine.
  3. Martin Jonas
    Martin Jonas
    Thanks, Christian. I'm not sure about "written for" -- Caroso's Il Ballerino was mainly a treatise on dancing with musical examples probably not written by the author himself. The musical examples were in lute tablature (see facsimile and transcription ), but whether that means they were originally played specifically on lute is a different question. These days, Caroso's dances are core repertoire for renaissance dancers, and usually played on louder instruments than the lute. Here are two nice and very different renditions on Youtube:

    Ernst Stolz on viola da gamba, organ & violone (rather slowly)
    A Hungarian renaissance band on woodwinds, cello and percussion (much faster)

    My tempo is about halfway between these.

    Martin
  4. Frithjof
    Frithjof
    Nice recording, Martin.
  5. Gelsenbury
    Gelsenbury
    I like Renaissance music, and pieces like this are the reason. It's a great melody, and you play the arrangement in a way that makes it all sound natural.

    Now, how about adding a bit of Krummhorn, Cornamuse or Rackett to the mix?
  6. Martin Jonas
    Martin Jonas
    Thanks, Dennis -- you mean like this lot:

    https://youtu.be/zIfaHNkvapk

    Martin
  7. Gelsenbury
    Gelsenbury
    Exactly like that! What a beautiful arrangement!
  8. John Kelly
    John Kelly
    Another interesting one, Martin. You seem to have an inexhaustible supply of those Renaissance tunes and have made them very much your own. The other version with all the woodwinds is just so different - Dennis must love this one.
Results 1 to 8 of 8