Week #437 ~ Bransle de Chevaux/Horses' Brawl, 16th Century French

  1. Barbara Shultz
    Barbara Shultz
    This week's winner is Bransle de Chevaux/Horses' Brawl, which was submitted as a 16th Century French tune.

    I found this on thesession.org. Be sure to read the comments, and see the other suggestions for notation.

    This is from abctunesearch.

    Here's another standard notation and mandolin tab











  2. Barbara Shultz
    Barbara Shultz
    I have a question for those familiar with this tune. Most of the notations has it with 3 parts, each played just once, but one has it with 3 parts, each part played twice (with a repeat). Which is more common?
  3. Mike Floorstand
    Mike Floorstand
    I've always heard it played with each part played twice. In the videos you posted too, only the last chap plays it just once, so he's clearly in a minority!
  4. Barbara Shultz
    Barbara Shultz
    Ok, here's mine, as usual, played slower than you would in performance! Twice through on my Collings MT2O mandolin.

  5. luurtie
    luurtie
    That's fast. How did you manage to learn it that quick? Excellent playing too!
  6. Martin Jonas
    Martin Jonas
    I recorded this back in 2012. First time through solo on my Embergher bowlback, second and third time through in four-part harmony on second mandolin and tenor guitars. Harmony from Steve Hendricks:

    http://sca.uwaterloo.ca/Hendricks/



    Martin
  7. Frithjof
    Frithjof


    Dancers on a medieval market in Germany copied the movements of horses.
  8. Barbara Shultz
    Barbara Shultz
    lurrtie... thanks! For some reason, I can memorize these simple tunes rather quickly.... The hardest part for me, in this tune, is that, for me at least, I have to use 'economy' picking rather than adhering to the picking pattern I have ingrained in me.... down on the beat, and up in between.... so, it's not the actual notes to play, that is hard, it's the pick direction!
  9. Mike Floorstand
    Mike Floorstand
    Well played Barbara - it never occurred to me that the F might be played natural instead of sharp in the third section until hearing your version - I shall have to listen more carefully at my next session it's quite likely they do too, and have been too polite to correct me!
  10. Jill McAuley
    Jill McAuley
    Lovely versions Barbara and Martin!
  11. Mark Gunter
    Mark Gunter
    A lot of interesting comments at thesession.org

    "It’s very often played with a low F natural in the last part.Opinion is divided."

    "this melody is a médiéval street music from the 13th century"
    - hmmm, do you think the origins might really be that old?

    "'Horses' is given in Orchesographie as a mimed branle (danced with miming and gestures)" - sheds light on the video Frithjof offered
  12. Kay Kirkpatrick
    Kay Kirkpatrick
    I like the F natural, too. Frith, thanks to your description of the video I can understand the name of the tune; very interesting.

    Martin, thanks so much to the link, that's a good resource. I always enjoy your 3- and 4-part harmonies.
  13. Frithjof
    Frithjof
    That’s my attempt. Work in progress, of course. Should become more fluent and get a more lively rhythm.



    I had a lot of fun to try and play with my other instruments to accompany myself. But I couldn’t spare the time to make a multiple track recording.
    I decided to play it in the key of D. I tried all thinkable sharps and flats and naturals in the third part. Maybe my version isn’t right for scientists but it works for me.
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