• Postal Service to Pay Tribute to Bluegrass Music with Stamp

    Postal Service to Pay Tribute to Bluegrass Music with Stamp

    On March 15, 2024, in Owensboro, KY, the United States Postal Service® will issue the Bluegrass stamp (Forever® priced at the First-Class Mail® rate) in one design, in a pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) pane of 20 stamps (Item 484700). This stamp will go on sale nationwide March 15, 2024, and must not be sold or canceled before the first-day-of-issue.

    With this stamp, USPS® celebrates the rich history of bluegrass. Inspired by vintage bluegrass concert posters, the stamp art features four acoustic string instruments typical of bluegrass bands — guitar, five-string banjo, fiddle, and mandolin — below the word "Bluegrass." Text at the top of the stamp reads "High Lonesome Sound," the title of a 1963 documentary about Appalachian folk music and a familiar nickname for bluegrass. Art director Antonio Alcalá worked with designer and illustrator Heather Moulder to produce the stamp art.

    The stamp dedication ceremony will occur in Owensboro on March 15 at the Bluegrass Music Hall of Fame & Museum. It will coincide with the Great American Bluegrass Jam taking place March 15-17 in downtown Owensboro.

    "Bluegrass is a singularly American music style," a release from USPS reads. "Bluegrass blends old-time folk and fiddle music with elements of the blues, jazz, country, and gospel. Born in the mid-20th century, bluegrass defies time, drawing inspiration from the past while also openly embracing innovation."

    The release continues: "The signature sound of bluegrass relies on a mix of acoustic string instruments. The five-string banjo dominates and, along with guitar, mandolin, and bass, sets the rhythmic foundation of this often fast-paced music. Fiddle, mandolin, banjo, and guitar evoke a range of melodic flavors and emotions in their solos and backup.

    The stamp dedication ceremony is open to the public in the lobby of the Bluegrass Music Hall of Fame & Museum, located at 311 West 2nd Street.

    Additional Information

    Comments 8 Comments
    1. Cheryl Watson's Avatar
      Cheryl Watson -
      Very cool! I do wonder, however, why the word "FOREVER" is crossed out (?)
    1. journeybear's Avatar
      journeybear -
      Possibly due to concerns about duplication leading to unauthorized sales?

      I think the artwork is a little clunky - and oh, that scroll - but I definitely give the artist props for getting the number and placement of tuning pegs right on each instrument.

      All in all, glad to see our beloved instrument getting some recognition.
    1. Mandolin Cafe's Avatar
      Mandolin Cafe -
      The United States Postal Service requires a line through the word "Forever" when the stamp is pictured. This is done to prevent counterfeit copies. The stamps you receive do not have the line through the word.
    1. Cheryl Watson's Avatar
      Cheryl Watson -
      Quote Originally Posted by Mandolin Cafe View Post
      The United States Postal Service requires a line through the word "Forever" when the stamp is pictured. This is done to prevent counterfeit copies. The stamps you receive do not have the line through the word.
      Thanks Scott.
    1. Perry's Avatar
      Perry -
      Still isn’t there a better way of preventing counterfeits? A line through forever doesn’t seem right.
    1. journeybear's Avatar
      journeybear -
      It's just an ad. The functioning part of the stamp is the word FOREVER. If it were a denominational stamp the number would be disfigured. Same difference.
    1. journeybear's Avatar
      journeybear -
      Hey! Look what showed up on today's episode of Jeopardy! OK, it was in a category named "New U.S. Stamps For 2024" - a philatelic category, not musical - but hey, it showed up, and a contestant got it right.



      Attachment 212384
    1. Cary Fagan's Avatar
      Cary Fagan -
      Very cool. As a Canadian, I'll have to find someone to send me one!