• New Music From The David Grisman Sextet

    San Rafael, Calif. — Award-winning mandolinist and music producer David Grisman has announced the release of The David Grisman Sextet, the first collection of Grisman originals in a decade.

    New Music From The David Grisman Sextet

    In 1976 the newly-formed David Grisman Quintet recorded their first album of Dawg Music, a recording that was ground-breaking and ultimately led a revolution of new adventurous acoustic music.

    Fans of the original David Grisman Quintet recording (shown below) will instantly recognize the similarity between the new album art and the original recording, a nod to the history of the Grisman Dawg groups.

    Band Personnel

    David Grisman - mandolin, banjo-mandolin
    Jim Kerwin - bass
    Matt Eakle - flute, bass flute, kazoo, penny whistle
    George Marsh - drums, percussion
    Chad Manning - fiddle
    George Cole - guitar

    Selections

    • Bells Of Camoglia
    • The Purple Grotto
    • Newly Wedding
    • Slinky
    • Horn Pipe Dream
    • Waltz For Gigi
    • Dawg's Bounce
    • Hannah & Rio
    • Del & Dawg

    Listen

    From The David Grisman Sextet:

    The Purple Grotto


    Hannah & Rio


    The David Grisman Sextet reviewed.

    Fellow music listeners, on this momentous occasion of Acoustic Disc celebrating 40 years since the original David Grisman Quintet recording, I'm here to proclaim the state of Dawg Music to be strong and growing, and David still making music that matters.

    Giving the recording a first (and subsequent) listen, it should come as no surprise that the timeless quality of David's writing shines throughout. "The Purple Grotto," track #2 is a good example of a piece of music that at once is both Dawg Music yet reflects the lasting impact of gypsy jazz on the genre. It makes me happy.

    "Hannah & Rio" was another track I found compelling, and I'm grateful to share this brilliant composition. Many musicians try to write this piece of music. Few succeed. To my ear, this is music that has purpose, that matters. It might make you cry. You've been warned.

    I suppose I could on and wax poetic about this and that, but that's just not me. The fact is, I adore this album.

    Over the years, the original line-up that boasted two mandolins has morphed to one mandolin and now includes drums and flute, yet Grisman's familiar chop chords employing the four-fingered minor and major seventh chords he favors still ring true throughout the project. There's no mistaking who you're listening to. And no surprise, he always employs top-notch musicians.

    I'm not sure where Dawg Music is headed in the future, but it's clear it's still evolving, and I find it as enjoyable as the music that launched an acoustic revolution some 40 years ago.

    Scott Tichenor
    Mandolin Cafe


    Additional information


    David Grisman Quintet album cover, 1976

    Original David Grisman Quintet album, 1976
    Comments 4 Comments
    1. BrianWilliam's Avatar
      BrianWilliam -
      Forty years later, percussion shows up.

      Those sample tracks sounded great.
    1. Gary Leonard's Avatar
      Gary Leonard -
      Percussion has been a part of the quartet for a long time, at the DGS show last night, I think David said George Marsh has been playing drums for 10+ years with him. And there was a percussionist through some of the 80's and 90's.

      What really kicked it up a notch was the flute, it added a completely new dimension to the old songs, as well as really standing out in the new tunes. If you get a chance, see them!
    1. AlanN's Avatar
      AlanN -
      Very cool retro cover! Now all they have to do is don some bell-bottoms and they'd be set
    1. mmukav's Avatar
      mmukav -
      Very hip! I like it, thanks Dawg!