PDA

View Full Version : Happy 100th birthday, Gibson pick guard clamp patent



Yandy
Jul-04-2011, 3:28am
It would be a shame to pass today without sharing this date:

73966

I believe it only became a paid holiday in 1938. Have a nice day.

Jim Garber
Jul-04-2011, 9:18am
I love my Gibson pickguard clamp. I will have to wish it a happy patent day. :)

journeybear
Jul-04-2011, 9:35am
Will ya look at that! Been staring me in the face all these years, at least whenever I changed my strings. OK, it's in deep storage - lost its spring and thus rattled too much - but still ... Congratulations, BPGCP, and many, many more! :mandosmiley:

F-2 Dave
Jul-04-2011, 12:32pm
It doesn't look a day over 75. Happy Birthday.

mandroid
Jul-10-2011, 2:43pm
Patent Lapsed a long time ago... only Steve Gilchrist , has, it seems ,
hired any replicas to be manufactured..
I think you have to buy one of his Mandolins to get one.. :popcorn:

Bernie Daniel
Jul-10-2011, 4:06pm
Patent Lapsed a long time ago... only Steve Gilchrist , has, it seems ,
hired any replicas to be manufactured..
I think you have to buy one of his Mandolins to get one.. :popcorn:

I have heard this before. Does anyone know who he used to make them and/or where they were made?

I once got a quote from a local metal working company for making a batch of these clamps. Using their connections with a Chinese factory to do the actual pressing and assembly the cost per unit was reasonable. But the start up costs and outlay was not very appealing for any individual to think about doing. For a minimum run of 500 units the total cost including design/making the press dies, the raw materials, and the assembly was a bit over $20K. This was five years ago. That would be a pretty cheap unit price ($40) but its a big investment and it might take a lifetime to sell 500 clamps?

Vernon Hughes
Jul-10-2011, 10:53pm
I just got a quote from a specialty metal and engineering co. here locally..500 faithfully and exactly reproduced in stainless steel (the smallest amount of them they would consider) would end up costing me 300.00 each..Just not cost effective..Still looking at some other places for quotes..Got to be somebody out there willing to gear up and make these things somewhat reasonable..Might just have to figure it out myself,it's just not that complicated..

Bernie Daniel
Jul-10-2011, 11:28pm
I just got a quote from a specialty metal and engineering co. here locally..500 faithfully and exactly reproduced in stainless steel (the smallest amount of them they would consider) would end up costing me 300.00 each..Just not cost effective..Still looking at some other places for quotes..Got to be somebody out there willing to gear up and make these things somewhat reasonable..Might just have to figure it out myself,it's just not that complicated..

Did you inquire as to whether they had a connection to a Chinese factory? The production costs were only a fraction of doing it in the USA -- the stumbling block was the number of units required just to consider the job. I think they also told me that they thought nickel-silver was the wrong metal to use despite the fact that Gibson originally used it. I can't recall -- have to look it up -- but I think they proposed an aluminum alloy.

I bought a sheet of "German silver" which is really a nickel-silver on eBay and was going to try making one but I got side-tracked. Maybe this winter. Does anyone happen to know if the clasp for the mandolas pick guard was the same clamp just opened wider or did they make a larger clamp designed for the deeper body?

Loudloar
Jul-10-2011, 11:46pm
It's curious to me that a patent was issued on the 4th of July. That's always been a national holiday, even if it wasn't a paid holiday. Didn't they let those patent office employees have the day off?

Steve

Loudloar
Jul-10-2011, 11:54pm
Ok - I found that the 4th has been celebrated since 1777, and that in 1870 the U.S. Congress made Independence Day an unpaid holiday for federal employees. In 1941, Congress changed Independence Day to a paid federal holiday.

So, apparently no federal employees were on the job on July 4, 1911, but somehow that became the patent date of record anyway.

Steve

Vernon Hughes
Jul-11-2011, 6:05am
Bernie,no chinese connection..They would be made right here in town..As I understand them to have the die stamps made to produce each individual part would run a couple thousand each,then the cost of material and labor to produce,assemble and polish was figured into the final number..I thought it quite high myself..They seemed to think stainless steel would be the way to go,much stronger and polished up easily..

PJ Doland
Jul-11-2011, 7:01am
3D printing has really come a long way in the last few years.

Has anybody ever tried to have something like this fabricated by Shapeways or a similar vendor?

journeybear
Jul-11-2011, 10:25am
It's curious to me that a patent was issued on the 4th of July. That's always been a national holiday, even if it wasn't a paid holiday. Didn't they let those patent office employees have the day off?

Steve

Ha! Interesting point. Independence Day wasn't a national holiday until 1870, when it was made an unpaid holiday for federal employees. It didn't become a paid federal holiday until 1931, 1938, or 1941, depending on where you look. :disbelief: That said, you are right to question this. Perhaps it wasn't a mandatory holiday, or perhaps someone at Gibson knew someone at the Patent office who agreed to fudge the date slightly.

BTW, there was a record-breaking heat wave in the Northeast on July 4, 1911. (http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/heat-wave-strikes-northeast) And also, it was a Tuesday - so maybe offices were open for business.