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View Full Version : Bury Me Beneath the Willow - Favorite version?



Witz
Mar-21-2011, 6:00pm
Anyone have a recorded version of this beautiful song they are particularly partial to? I have the Skaggs and Rice rendition.

On YouTube there is an amazing video of Allison Krauss singing it at Rounder Records 20th anniversary concert with Tony Rice, David Grisman, J.D. Crowe, and Mark Schatz accompanying. Please tell me she recorded this at some point, or that this concert was recorded and it doesn't just exist on YouTube???

re simmers
Mar-21-2011, 8:22pm
Skaggs & Rice is THE version in my mind.

Bob

Jean Fugal
Mar-21-2011, 8:29pm
Peter Ostroushko-Blue Mesa

Andrew Roberts
Mar-21-2011, 8:56pm
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rQVa2xDaa7I

This one is nice. Me like.

allenhopkins
Mar-21-2011, 9:36pm
The "original" version:



The first song the Carter Family recorded, at the famous "Bristol Sessions" in 1927. Check out the photos! And Sara Carter's voice, before a lifetime of cigarettes put her into the near-baritone range...

Mike Bunting
Mar-21-2011, 10:00pm
Interesting how the phrasing has changed over the years.

SternART
Mar-22-2011, 12:44am
Whoops........was thinkin' of that other 'Willow" tune.......

doc holiday
Mar-22-2011, 8:56am
For me I find the Skaggs/Rice version definitive, but as an instrumentalist, my favorite is the Scott Nygaard/John Reischman version off Scott's "No Hurry" recording

JeffD
Mar-22-2011, 9:02am
Its the Carter Family version is my favorite. In m mind its the definitive one. But I do love the Skaggs and Rice version as well.

Rick Schmidlin
Mar-22-2011, 9:08am
The Carter Family is the best ever, hands down!

AW Meyer
Mar-22-2011, 9:58am
Rosanne Cash does a fine version on her album "The List."

Willie Poole
Mar-22-2011, 10:46am
I always liked the Davis sisters version, Skeeter could sing back then.....Not bluegrass ..BUT....

grassrootphilosopher
Mar-22-2011, 10:49am
The ultimate instrumental version is the Clarence White one from this cassette/LP (http://www.amazon.de/Kentucky-Colonels-Featuring-Clarence-Musikkassette/dp/B0000002DT). A similar version by Clarence White is on this CD (http://itunes.apple.com/us/album/33-acoustic-guitar-instrumentals/id330218161). Itīs also pretty amazing.

Matteo
Mar-22-2011, 1:09pm
Beside the Carter Family's original, that has a great feel of the melody and wonderful breaks by Maybelle, it's gotta be the 1957 Lilly Brothers' recording that appears on their Early Recordings album...now that's how you sing bluegrass music!
Matt.

Witz
Mar-22-2011, 2:19pm
Figured I would post the Allison Krauss video I was talking about, wish there was a record with this version on it:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jzA68Ohwke4

re simmers
Mar-22-2011, 3:47pm
That's a fantastic version. Grisman is clean, perfect phrasing, nice back up, and tasteful. Grisman's tremelo is so smooth and matches the song.

Alison sounds fantastic, as always. This was before she started to whisper. Anyone else notice her singing has become more of a soft whisper over the past 8-10 years, or is it just me? She still sounds great!

Bob

David M.
Mar-22-2011, 3:52pm
Skaggs/Rice is probably the one that influenced the way I sing/play it, but I tend to really like the early ones like Wade Mainer and Burnett & Rutherford. Good stuff. The Burnett & Rutherford one is early, around the time of the Bristol sessions. Maybe a year or two earlier? Not sure.

Andrew Roberts
Mar-22-2011, 7:59pm
Man, after all of this support for the Carter Family version, I feel a little embarrassed for having never heard it. Like Mike said, it is interesting how the phrasing changed. Anyone know around when that happened? That version isn't quite my cup of tea as far as something I would listen to everyday, but still a great little history lesson for me. I love singing this song, and it is cool to see how the song has changed.

JeffD
Mar-22-2011, 10:46pm
Figured I would post the Allison Krauss video I was talking about,

Wow, that is a great version.

JeffD
Mar-22-2011, 10:48pm
That version isn't quite my cup of tea as far as something I would listen to everyday, but still a great little history lesson for me. I love singing this song, and it is cool to see how the song has changed.

I know what you mean. My preference probably has more to do with familiarity than anything else. There's plenty of tunes where I prefer a more recent recording over an original that is new to me.

allenhopkins
Mar-22-2011, 11:38pm
Here's the Burnett & Rutherford version, recorded 1926, before the Carters' Bristol recording:



This one takes some "getting used to"; the idiosyncratic beat, Burnett's "mouth music" jew's-harp imitations, etc. Dick Burnett, blind banjo player, is credited with composing Man of Constant Sorrow, the O Brother Stanley/Tyminski mega-hit (well, as "mega" as such things get). What I didn't realize until I looked them up, was that Burnett & Rutherford's performing career stretched from 1914 to 1950, which is pretty darn impressive and covers some major changes in country music, from Eck Robertson to Hank Williams...

swampstomper
Mar-23-2011, 1:31am
Interesting how the folk process has changed some of the lyrics:

Rutherford: "They told me that he did not love me, oh how could I think that true?"
Carter Family "They told me that he did not love me, I could not believe it was true"
Skaggs & Rice "He told me that he dearly loved me, how could I believe him untrue?

Alison leaves that verse out.

It's amazing how "modern" the Carters sound, considering the time. Three-part harmony (well, AP a little late joining some of the verses), Maybelle picking a respectable lead guitar.

Anyway a great song, a lament.

Jonathan Reinhardt
Mar-23-2011, 8:14am
thanks, allen. and everyone for a great thread. R. Burnett was someone who brought this wonderful music to a wider public at a time when few others did.

David M.
Mar-23-2011, 8:30am
Here's the Burnett & Rutherford version, recorded 1926, before the Carters' Bristol recording:


This one takes some "getting used to"; the idiosyncratic beat, Burnett's "mouth music" jew's-harp imitations, etc. Dick Burnett, blind banjo player, is credited with composing Man of Constant Sorrow, the O Brother Stanley/Tyminski mega-hit (well, as "mega" as such things get). What I didn't realize until I looked them up, was that Burnett & Rutherford's performing career stretched from 1914 to 1950, which is pretty darn impressive and covers some major changes in country music, from Eck Robertson to Hank Williams...

Yep, good stuff and Burnett did some wild things with his banjo head drumming and his mouth jaw harp sounds. The Tune Ladies On the Steamboat is one of my favorite tunes and he does it like crazy on that recording.

One of my favorite songs to do on banjo 2finger or flattop is Flower From The Fields of Alabama that Burnett and Rutherford did. Great song and it was covered by N. Blake on an album by that name.

My fiddle influence, Jim Gaskin of Danville, KY was friends of Leonard Rutherford (Somerset, KY), and played a real obscure tune that he called Leonard's Reel or Rutherford's Reel because he never heard a name for it.

John Ritchhart
Apr-02-2011, 12:16am
The accents are interesting. Listen to recordings of the 20's, 30's, 50's etc. You can actually hear the language (accent) changing. Who talks like Katharine Hepburn anymore? Now we have young women who are insiders or government wonks sounding like Moon Unit Zappa. It amazes me.

wsugai
Apr-12-2011, 2:52pm
Jo Miller & Laura Love.

Brent Hutto
Apr-12-2011, 3:20pm
The ultimate instrumental version is the Clarence White one from this cassette/LP (http://www.amazon.de/Kentucky-Colonels-Featuring-Clarence-Musikkassette/dp/B0000002DT). A similar version by Clarence White is on this CD (http://itunes.apple.com/us/album/33-acoustic-guitar-instrumentals/id330218161). Itīs also pretty amazing.

Yep, ol' Clarence absolutely kills on that one. May be my favorite cut on that CD.

Bogle
Apr-12-2011, 9:11pm
The version featuring the late Ralph Rinzler on David Grisman's "Life of Sorrow" project.

Mar10Guitar
May-03-2011, 8:44am
I grew a little fond of Darrell Webb doing it with Mashville Brigade...

AKmusic
May-03-2011, 10:35am
Another vote for Rice/Skaggs version.

RiverGrass
Dec-04-2012, 9:02pm
Let us not forget Thile and Dave's version. My vote is still on Skaggs and Rice though.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c6CCeUdM7Rk

Bigtuna
Dec-04-2012, 9:32pm
Another vote for Rice/Skaggs version.

Chalk up one more Tony and Ricky!

Spruce
Dec-04-2012, 9:40pm
There's a nice version of Ricky and Emmylou doing the tune here (http://www.radiofreeolga.com/rfo-podcasts/podcast-23-emmylou-harris.html)...

You'll have to listen to the whole show to find it, though... ;)

dawgmike94
Dec-04-2012, 9:41pm
Yep, Skaggs and Rice do a great job on that, especially love Ricky's harmony.
Also, Woody Guthrie sings a good version of it, with some words that I hadn't heard before...

lukmanohnz
Dec-04-2012, 10:32pm
I really like that YouTube version you posted with Alison Krauss singing - that's the first I'd seen it; thank you very much! But I did miss the harmony vocal line. I love the Skagg-Rice version - it's probably my favorite. But now I'm going to have to dig out my copy of No Hurry and listen to the Nygaard-Reischman instrumental version again!

chip
Dec-04-2012, 10:37pm
The Greencards is my pick...!

lukmanohnz
Dec-05-2012, 6:57am
There's a nice version of Ricky and Emmylou doing the tune here (http://www.radiofreeolga.com/rfo-podcasts/podcast-23-emmylou-harris.html)...

You'll have to listen to the whole show to find it, though... ;)

This is a great show, even with the low-fi recording. BMBTW starts at 17:45 for the impatient...

onassis
Dec-05-2012, 7:45am
I really like that YouTube version you posted with Alison Krauss singing - that's the first I'd seen it; thank you very much! But I did miss the harmony vocal line.

That was my thought as well. The harmony really makes the song for me.

Spruce
Dec-05-2012, 11:01am
This is a great show, even with the low-fi recording.

It's a cassette recording with one cheap mic...
The other mic was distorted, rendering the recording useless to the ear unless a little work was done on it 30 years later... ;)
This pic was taken the same night:

http://i231.photobucket.com/albums/ee22/e_stamp/Emmylou-Harris-Blue-Kentucky-Girl.jpg

Mandolin Mick
Dec-05-2012, 12:06pm
Well, the only version I've really been familiar with is the one by Hylo Brown. I like a lot of his stuff.

But having listened to the version by the Bluegrass All-Stars with Allison Krauss singing and Dawg on the mandolin, I like that better! :)

Charley wild
Dec-05-2012, 3:23pm
I learned it off of a Lilly Brothers album many years ago and still like that version best. But I like them all.:)

tmsweeney
Dec-05-2012, 3:39pm
I vote for Ostroushko Blue Mesa version - I believe Nancy and Norman are playing guitar and cello on that

Natalie Merchant does a nice version on her "House Carpenter's Daughter" recording as well

Mike Bunting
Dec-05-2012, 3:56pm
Ain't nothin' wrong with the original.

Bernie Daniel
Dec-05-2012, 4:18pm
Here is a version I stumble across one day by a self-taught, and relatively inexperienced guitar player -- nonetheless I've listened to it several times and each time I find her performance enjoyable. Mostly I like her ideas on the presentation I think.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o518y9-93Sg

allenhopkins
Dec-05-2012, 4:24pm
Ain't nothin' wrong with the original...

Assume you know I stuck this in Post #5 already.

Mike Bunting
Dec-05-2012, 5:43pm
Assume you know I stuck this in Post #5 already.

That was a year and a half ago! How am I supposed to remember that far back! :)

Mike Bunting
Dec-05-2012, 5:45pm
Here is a version I stumble across one day by a self-taught, and relatively inexperienced guitar player -- nonetheless I've listened to it several times and each time I find her performance enjoyable. Mostly I like her ideas on the presentation I think.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o518y9-93Sg

I hear you. I'm liking it too.

AW Meyer
Dec-06-2012, 12:54pm
I still like Rosanne Cash's version.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5olZukHLrco

greg_tsam
Dec-06-2012, 4:14pm
I still like Rosanne Cash's version.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5olZukHLrco

I went ahead and embedded it for you. Hope you don't mind.