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View Full Version : Recommend me some psychedelic newgrass or some jamgrass!



Mandolin Holm
Dec-06-2010, 1:41pm
Haven't heard much in the genres, but I'm very interested.

Thanks in advance!

MikeEdgerton
Dec-06-2010, 1:58pm
As much as I want to write "I don't think that most people realize that Iron Butterfly's In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida was recorded with two mandolins and an octave mandolin..." I won't. :cool:

Jim MacDaniel
Dec-06-2010, 2:40pm
lol -- but on a related note, here (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001071CX6/ref=dm_dp_trk3?ie=UTF8&qid=1291664310&sr=1-4) is John Kruth's mandolin version of the Yardbird's psychedelic classic Over Under Sideways Down.

farmerjones
Dec-06-2010, 2:42pm
any Bella Flec CD.

mandocrucian
Dec-06-2010, 2:56pm
The studio Muleskinner album with Peter Rowan on rhythm guitar & vocals; Clarence White on lead guitar (acoustic and electric). "Runways of The Moon", "Blue Mule". Old & In The Way had similarities, but Muleskinner was much better, imo.

Also, if you can find a copy of the first Tim Ware Group album on Kaliedoscope. All acoustic with mandolin highlighted, but I always thought of it as San Francisco acoustic rock more than any form of -grass.

And you can't ever go wrong with Dan Hicks & The Hot Licks. Where's The Money? and Striking It Rich are two of his best. (From Frisco)

Or you could just make your own compilation of "more acoustic" (or acoustic rendition friendly) tracks from the classic SF psychedelic bands from Jefferson Airplane ("Good Shepherd", "Embryonic Journey"), Quicksilver Messenger Service ("Fresh Air", "Shady Grove", "Pride Of Man"), Grateful Dead (loads of material!), Man (OK, they were from Wales, but they were the "Welsh Quicksilver"), Hot Tuna, Byrds (though they were from LA) etc.

Actually if you want pyschedelic sounds in your head, go to the original sources (as named above) for your material and inspiration.

NH

mandotool
Dec-06-2010, 3:13pm
Start here .....grasshopper..http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pgX7lT4WaKA&feature=related

Mandolin Holm
Dec-06-2010, 3:17pm
Thanks a lot!

Keep them coming!

Johnny Mandolin
Dec-06-2010, 3:51pm
Well obviously Newgrass Revival and Sam Bush, but as for some of the newer bands I would say Yonder Mountain String Band, Leftover Salmon, early The String Cheese Incident (as their later stuff is more rave/dance like music though it does still include a 5-string electric mandolin), the Emmitt-Nershi Band, Great American Taxi, South Austin Jug Band (not sure if they are still together or not), The Creaking Tree String Quartet (from Toronto, Canada), The Jazz Mandolin Project, and Railroad Earth. I'm not sure if Punch Brothers w/ Chris Thile would necessarily fall in the category or not, but they are kind of off creating a category of their own right now. Definitely worth giving a listen though! I'm sure there are more that I listen to but that is all that comes to mind at the moment.

Mandolin Holm
Dec-06-2010, 4:03pm
Well obviously Newgrass Revival and Sam Bush, but as for some of the newer bands I would say Yonder Mountain String Band, Leftover Salmon, early The String Cheese Incident (as their later stuff is more rave/dance like music though it does still include a 5-string electric mandolin), the Emmitt-Nershi Band, Great American Taxi, South Austin Jug Band (not sure if they are still together or not), The Creaking Tree String Quartet (from Toronto, Canada), The Jazz Mandolin Project, and Railroad Earth. I'm not sure if Punch Brothers w/ Chris Thile would necessarily fall in the category or not, but they are kind of off creating a category of their own right now. Definitely worth giving a listen though! I'm sure there are more that I listen to but that is all that comes to mind at the moment.

Thanks :) I've heard the first ones you mentioned, but not the rest. Will be sure to check it all out!

allenhopkins
Dec-06-2010, 5:12pm
Go to YouTube, search on "jamgrass"; I just did. Literally hundreds of videos. Spend the next couple days checkin' 'em out.

catmandu2
Dec-06-2010, 5:19pm
New Riders o/t Purple Sage--weren't grass, but they were seminal psych--String Cheese Incident, Jamie's JMP, Commander Cody...are among my favorites.

MandoNicity
Dec-06-2010, 5:27pm
Yonder Mountain String Band, and Strength In Numbers are two that come to mind. Strength In Numbers does a fantastic version of Hendrix's "Third Stone From The Sun" and Procol Harums, "Whiter Shade Of Pale". Béla Fleck, Mark O'Connor, Sam Bush,Jerry Douglas, and Edgar Meyer. Doesn't get much better.

JR

Mike Bunting
Dec-06-2010, 5:27pm
What do you mean by psychedelic? Most of the examples listed ain't, to my understanding. I'd say that Niles nailed it with the bands that he listed.

Charlieshafer
Dec-06-2010, 5:56pm
You want psychedelic? Then you have to check out the Horseflies (http://www.thehorseflies.com/)
30 years of the most wacked-out bluegrass and old-time imaginable. The leader of the group, Jeff Claus, uses a banjo-uke, but it's eminently transferrable to mandolin. The Village Voice described them as "demented post-modern mountain music."

There's a bunch of odd-ball stuff that Bill Frisell has done with old-time and bluegrass tunes, as well, such as Cluck Old Hen (Horseflies are great on this, also). Frisell's stuff is more moody and atmospheric (he never met a compressor he didn't like), and the Horseflies are just plain strange, but a lot of fun, especially live, or rarely, in a dance tent.

catmandu2
Dec-06-2010, 6:00pm
Again, not grass, but Eugene Chadbourne is a good example of the "psych" ouvre. I think he referred to it as C&W-LSD, or some such..?

catmandu2
Dec-06-2010, 6:03pm
Go to YouTube, search on "jamgrass"; I just did. Literally hundreds of videos. Spend the next couple days checkin' 'em out.

But, for maximum impact, do so in an altered state..

Mandotarian
Dec-06-2010, 7:52pm
Railroad Earth, Leftover Salmon, Trampled by Turtles, Greensky Bluegrass (kinda)

RBMB
Dec-06-2010, 8:12pm
Psychograss - any of the CDs are fine
Looking Back - Phillips Grier & Flinner
Wake the Dead

journeybear
Dec-06-2010, 10:08pm
Then there's this, a bluegrass standard done in the style of Vanilla Fudge or Robin Trower:

Bigtuna
Dec-06-2010, 10:33pm
The original Aquarium Rescue Unit with Matt Mundy on mandolin, Jimmy Herring (WSP) on guitar, Oteil Burbridge (Allman Bros.) on bass and Col. Bruce on electric uke,get the live album!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e7y4zHcn6DI&feature=related

Mandolin Holm
Dec-07-2010, 4:45am
I guess I have enough now to be satisfied for a few months :)

Thanks a lot for all the recommendations! Now I'm off to youtube.

Jon Hall
Dec-07-2010, 8:33am
Chris Thile's "All Who Wander Are Not Lost" is great album of the jam grass style.

farmerjones
Dec-07-2010, 9:42am
Give a guy a phish, he eats once. Teach a guy to fish he'll never go hungry. So. . . .

Listen to Bill Monroe, Flatt & Scruggs and the Stanley Bros.

Then listen to Charlie Parker, Thelonius Monk, and Miles Davies.

Then mix them up in you own mind.

The original stuff has heart & soul. You can blend it and not dillute it. But ripping something third generation is gonna leave you cold.

fAtHanD
Dec-07-2010, 1:17pm
John Hartford's Aeroplane record. Not psychedelic but for sure newgrass.

Spruce
Dec-07-2010, 1:32pm
To me, "psychedelic" implies that the music takes you to places that you didn't even know existed...

One of my favorite acoustic bands that features the mandolin--and is a very "psychedelic" experience to these ears--is Freshet.
Very underrated, and yet I'd put them right up there with the Grisman Quintets, Tim Ware, and hell, just about anybody....

The material is outstanding, and waaaay more complex and interesting than most of the stuff that is out there....

If you want to hear a taste of them, go to one of my recent podcasts here (http://www.radiofreeolga.com/RadioFreeOlga/Podcasts/Entries/2010/11/15_John_Miller_Does_the_San_Juans.....html), and listen to the first tune....
Whew!!

Very mind-expanding music, IMHO....

Dan Johnson
Dec-07-2010, 6:50pm
How about the Packway Handle Band, of Athens, Georgia? They sure put on a good show... More bluegrass than psychadelic, but young and wild...

Charlieshafer
Dec-07-2010, 7:04pm
To me, "psychedelic" implies that the music takes you to places that you didn't even know existed...

One of my favorite acoustic bands that features the mandolin--and is a very "psychedelic" experience to these ears--is Freshet.
Very underrated, and yet I'd put them right up there with the Grisman Quintets, Tim Ware, and hell, just about anybody....

The material is outstanding, and waaaay more complex and interesting than most of the stuff that is out there....

If you want to hear a taste of them, go to one of my recent podcasts here (http://www.radiofreeolga.com/RadioFreeOlga/Podcasts/Entries/2010/11/15_John_Miller_Does_the_San_Juans.....html), and listen to the first tune....
Whew!!

Very mind-expanding music, IMHO....

Hey Spruce, I'm liking Freshet. I tried a Google search but came up empty. Do they exist in anything more than a temporary plane of existence? Any recorded stuff. Do they travel?

MandoNicity
Dec-07-2010, 7:55pm
Hey Bigtuna! Thanks for the link! Crazy Wicked Good!


JR

Mattg
Dec-08-2010, 4:12pm
self moderated. Never mind

Spruce
Dec-08-2010, 4:42pm
Hey Spruce, I'm liking Freshet. I tried a Google search but came up empty. Do they exist in anything more than a temporary plane of existence? Any recorded stuff. Do they travel?

Well, two of the members are from Washington State, and 2 are from Finland....
So-ooo, they don't gig that often... ;)

Here's (http://www.cdbaby.com/cd/freshet) their CD, and I highly recommend it...

I'll go out on a limb and say they are the most underrated band featuring mandolin out there...
Kinda their own genre, really...
If you like Dawg music, these folks are for you...
The material is stunningly good...

Ed Goist
Dec-08-2010, 4:54pm
A band I'd recommend, and one I also learned about from Spruce (in another thread he mentioned that one of the musicians in the band [the fiddle player, I think] was touring with a Morris mandolin) is Elephant Revival (http://elephantrevival.com/).

Although they call themselves Transcendental Folk, the music is acoustic and has a definite psychedelic vibe to it. Good Stuff! Enjoy.

Mandolin Holm
Dec-08-2010, 5:38pm
A band I'd recommend, and one I also learned about from Spruce (in another thread he mentioned that one of the musicians in the band [the fiddle player, I think] was touring with a Morris mandolin) is Elephant Revival (http://elephantrevival.com/).

Although they call themselves Transcendental Folk, the music is acoustic and has a definite psychedelic vibe to it. Good Stuff! Enjoy.

Just checked them out, and I don't know how to thank you enough!
Gonna order their CDs as soon as I've got money. Their music is really amazing!

Charlieshafer
Dec-08-2010, 6:19pm
Thanks for the links, both Spruce and Ed. Cdbaby... should have known.

Steve Sorensen
Dec-09-2010, 11:13am
Here's another plug for the Tim Ware Group. Apparently killed in label disputes . . . but the music is out there.
Steve

Spruce
Dec-09-2010, 11:44am
Here's another plug for the Tim Ware Group. Apparently killed in label disputes . . . but the music is out there.

Great band, and really good live....
The late great Bob Alekno was a wonderful guy and musician....



A band I'd recommend.....is Elephant Revival (http://elephantrevival.com/)...

Love those folks...
Here's (http://www.radiofreeolga.com/RadioFreeOlga/Podcasts/Entries/2010/12/8_Elephant_Revival%2C_Set_Two.....html) another podcast, this one featuring Elephant Revival playing on Orcas Island...
I might be sitting in on that set... :redface:

They have a new CD out produced by David Tiller from the band Taarka (http://www.taarka.com/), another great little psychedelic unit...

Ed Goist
Dec-10-2010, 4:37pm
If you like Elephant Revival's music, be sure to check out Black Prairie (http://www.facebook.com/blackprairie).
I'd say Black Prairie's music is a little darker and more brooding (appropriate, no?), but still excellent.
Black Prairie is also from the Pacific Northwest...What's in the water up there? :disbelief:
(and I need to get me some!) :grin:
Oh, and I've read on Elephant Revival's Facebook page that they often tour with Black Prairie...Sweet!...If any members of either group are lurking here: Please come to northeast Ohio. (It pains me so to see all of those tour dates in places thousands of mile away!)

Spruce
Dec-10-2010, 5:03pm
Yeah, Black Prairie is a great band...

The production on that CD by Tucker Martine is pretty interesting....
Backwards tracks, reverb crashes, etc. etc...

Definitely psychedelic....

ralph johansson
Dec-13-2010, 8:38am
There's the usual problems with labels. One would expect that something labeled jamgrass or newgrass would at least have some connection with the bluegrass tradition.
I hear nothing of it in Tim Ware's music or Freshet and far too much in Muleskinner.
Punch Brothers were mentioned. They have declared that they're

Bela Fleck became important when he forgot about being a "progressive" bluegrasser, as in Acoustic Planet pt.1. The New Acoustic movement, created by Richard Greene and David Grisman is more of a reaction, getting away from the limitations of bluegrass.
There's a clear jazz inspiration, in method rather than style, esp. on Dawg 90.


And Strength in Numbers really created and finished 10 genres on their Telluride album
(10 is the number of pairs you can form out of five individuals).

Most of this is very exciting music and, importantly, Fleck , Grisman and Strength
are all instrumental. Words are limiting.

Perhaps the topic should be widened to encompass all contemporary American string band music. I could go on for hours.

mandocrucian
Dec-13-2010, 2:55pm
There was another SF band I should have mentioned... at the time I knew there was someone else that needed to be on the list....It's A Beautiful Day.

(In fact I was looking on the shelves for their 1st LP, but can't find it.) I also need to put the Airplane's Volunteers and Bless Its Pointed Little Head LPs onto to the turntable and burn them onto CD.

Making "material" compilation discs for the car player is a routine procedure for me. As well as "play-along/jam" discs;

Here's what's on a very recent more pysch-playalong compilation (with which to practice my flute playing)

GRATEFUL DEAD
Uncle John's Band
New Speedway Boogie
Black Peter
Easy Wind
Candyman
Wharf Rat
China Cat Sunflower/I Know You Rider

QUICKSILVER MESSENGER SERVICE
Pride Of Man
Who Do You Love
Mona
Cobra
What About Me (the only track that actually has a flute on it)

THE DOORS
People Are Strange
The End
Roadhouse Blues
LA Woman
Riders On The Storm
Love Her Madly

IT'S A BEAUTIFUL DAY
Don and Dewey

FAIRPORT CONVENTION
Journeyman's Grace
Crazy Man Michael
Farewell, Farewell

NH

mhandley16
Dec-28-2010, 11:48pm
I'm really into Yonder Mountain String Band. Other good ones would be Leftover Salmon, Split Lip Rayfield, Emmit-Nershi Band, Whitewater Ramble. Although the sound quality isn't always the greatest, you can find alot of live shows from these bands here:

http://www.archive.org/browse.php?collection=etree&field=/metadata/creator

you can stream and download them.

SavannahGAMandoMan
Dec-30-2010, 4:01pm
YMSB & Sam Bush 04/17/09 (http://www.archive.org/details/yondermountainstringband2009-04-17.matrix.flac16)

Check out the jam of Peace of Mind > Girlfriend is Better > Fingerprint > Boatman's Dance > Peace of Mind

Some really cool stuff happening in there!

Dave Caulkins
Dec-31-2010, 1:59am
Wow, how did I miss Elephant Revival? Amazingly written, ethereal acoustic music. Easily the best band I have been turned onto this year. Not sure if it's really all that psychedelic per se, but it's truly beautiful. Black Prairie and Freshet deserve a mention too. On the Scandinavian front it's worth mentioning Vartiina (sp?), whose album Illmattar (sp?) is a masterpiece of spooky trad-fusion.

If you want to hear good psychedelic music I cannot recommend any band more than Gong, especially the Flying Teapot trilogy. Not acoustic, but damn near the weirdest stuff you'll hear with plenty of improvisation and jazz leanings. Caught them live over a decade ago (only North American tour, ever - they're French).

I also agree with learning the music at the roots of it all, which was the most valuable lesson the Dead ever gave me. Unfortunately, I realized how strong their roots were - and stopped being a hardcore Deadhead in favor of picking up their influences.

I fear we're wandering off the Newgrass train here, which - honestly - I think is OK. I've never been one to let tradition stand in the way of music.

Dave