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MANDOLINMYSTER
Feb-17-2010, 10:36am
Heres a few pics of a very nice style 40 mandolute. Gold tuner plate with real MOP buttons, and most importantly it does not have the top crack we see on so many of theses.

MANDOLINMYSTER
Feb-17-2010, 10:37am
and

MANDOLINMYSTER
Feb-17-2010, 10:39am
side ways sort of-

MANDOLINMYSTER
Feb-17-2010, 10:42am
burled neck

MANDOLINMYSTER
Feb-17-2010, 10:44am
try again

MANDOLINMYSTER
Feb-17-2010, 10:45am
back view-modest flame

MANDOLINMYSTER
Feb-17-2010, 10:47am
interesting detail-ebony finger board support extension(ala Lloyd)

JEStanek
Feb-17-2010, 11:07am
Lovely!, How's it sound?

Jamie

bratsche
Feb-17-2010, 12:05pm
Nice looking instrument! Mine, (SN #15931), (http://www.mandolincafe.com/forum/album.php?albumid=624&pictureid=4461) also crack-free and in excellent condition for its age, is almost the twin of yours. The pegs are some kind of grained ivoroid, though. My tuner plates look silver to me, though they don't look any different than those in your picture. How do you know they're gold?

And I'm curious to know if yours has the (rather typical, I hear) bowed neck? I had to make a replica bridge for mine in order to be able to play past the 12th fret, but the string action's too high to be comfortable (for me) over the bowed part.

And do you know what kind of wood the neck is made of? Mine looks the same.

bratsche

MANDOLINMYSTER
Feb-17-2010, 1:32pm
Jamie- I would discribe the sound as bright with mild bass, yet it has some resonance and warmth on the low strings.

bratsch- mine is sn# 35791 neck has some relief but I have action pretty low and plays with no buzz. The color of the tuner plates are gold, not sure if its real gold or not but there gold colored, not barss tho.

I suspect the neck is burled maple, with no finish, hey an early speed neck:))

Darryl Wolfe
Feb-17-2010, 1:39pm
My Style 20 is 23076. I really like the added trim on the 40

MANDOLINMYSTER
Feb-17-2010, 6:11pm
(I really like the added trim on the 40)

From what I understand there is a style 50 and even fancier style 70 that were made.

8ch(pl)
Feb-17-2010, 6:29pm
35791 is from 1924.

bratsche
Feb-17-2010, 7:26pm
Yeah, the tuner plates look definitely more gold now, in the picture of the mandolute in the case. The earlier closeup one must have been too overexposed, or had too much highlight or reflection, to tell. I have never seen a set of that kind of tuners in gold before. Neat!

I keep thinking I should have mine worked on to straighten the neck, so that I'd actually play it. It does have nice tone. But I have no idea who I could take it to.

bratsche

MANDOLINMYSTER
Feb-17-2010, 7:30pm
35791 is from 1924.

Thanks for the date info. I guess that makes it a Loar era:))

8ch(pl)
Feb-18-2010, 6:27am
Yeah, too bad he didn't sign it.

I wonder how many Army Navy models he signed.

Darryl Wolfe
Feb-18-2010, 8:58am
I also have a Style 20 that is Mahogany with no fiddle type edges. That one sounds extremely good. The maple one is sort of a dud, heavy and not too responsive.

Bob DeVellis
Feb-18-2010, 10:18am
I also have a Style 20 that is Mahogany with no fiddle type edges. That one sounds extremely good. The maple one is sort of a dud, heavy and not too responsive.

Yeah, I'd pretty much describe my maple Style 20 the same way. It's a cool looking instrument, with the fiddle edges and all. And it's in great shape. But it's pretty shrill and I can't say I love its tone.

Darryl Wolfe
Feb-18-2010, 10:53am
Here is the mahogany 20

brunello97
Feb-18-2010, 12:14pm
This is a helpful discussion for me. I have always enjoyed the look of these and have had 'mandolute' on my MAS list for a few years. The ones shown here look to be in great shape compared to many that I have seen. Kind of enlightening/disappointing to hear the lukewarm testimonials. Any other mandolute owners willing to describe their sound/playing experience?

Mick

allenhopkins
Feb-18-2010, 1:24pm
I had a 20, I guess, mahogany with no fiddle edges. Several repaired top cracks, but quite playable. It had a thin, sweet sound, and I used it for years for historical programs until I acquired a couple of late-19th-century bowl-backs that worked better, and I traded it in when buying my Eastman mandola.

Nice, easy-to-play mandolin, very user-friendly, with a decent sound: moderate volume, treble emphasis, closer to a bowl-back sound than a lot of other vintage flat-backs I've played. I paid $95 for it 30 years ago, got more than that back when I traded it in. No complaints.

Darryl Wolfe
Feb-18-2010, 1:36pm
The mahogany 20 I mentioned is actually exceptional. Very full sound and easy to play. I would say it sounds fuller and probably as good or better than most Martin flat styles

Darryl Wolfe
Feb-18-2010, 1:40pm
And...we have a nice one that just posted in the classifieds

bratsche
Feb-18-2010, 3:28pm
I would never describe mine (maple) as either "shrill" or "a dud". I like its resonant and warm sound very much for what I play on my mandos (Bach, mostly), and as I said before, it is only the bowed neck that prevents me from considering my mandolute a player instrument. Though for me, it's easier to play than my bowlback (which I've never been able to master). It's just kind of hard to love the cheese-cutter effect on the fingers above 3rd position for too much time! But then, I am partial to quite low action.

Out of curiosity, what kind of strings have other people put on theirs? I have Thomastik "Weich" on mine...

bratsche

MANDOLINMYSTER
Feb-18-2010, 4:57pm
I think I have GHS A250's on it now. they are very light strings and it could probally take heavier one.

Bob DeVellis
Feb-18-2010, 7:31pm
I have Tomastiks, also, although I'm not sure what weight. They do a pretty good job of containing the shrillness. I've had a couple of rosewood Martin flatbacks and they were/are (still have one of 'em) far more suited to my tastes than the Weymann.

brunello97
Feb-18-2010, 11:20pm
Here is a style 50 that I have in my files. With the dye-job I don't feel comfortable making a call on the wood type. Maybe others can call it. Are there any rosewood backed mandolutes out there?

Mick

bigbike
Feb-18-2010, 11:23pm
I would never describe mine (maple) as either "shrill" or "a dud". I like its resonant and warm sound very much for what I play on my mandos (Bach, mostly), and as I said before, it is only the bowed neck that prevents me from considering my mandolute a player instrument. Though for me, it's easier to play than my bowlback (which I've never been able to master). It's just kind of hard to love the cheese-cutter effect on the fingers above 3rd position for too much time! But then, I am partial to quite low action.

Out of curiosity, what kind of strings have other people put on theirs? I have Thomastik "Weich" on mine...

bratsche

Can you not sand the bridge down some to lower the action, or is there another issue such as a bowed or twisted neck?

bratsche
Feb-19-2010, 12:16am
Can you not sand the bridge down some to lower the action, or is there another issue such as a bowed or twisted neck?

As I stated, the neck is definitely bowed, and I actually had to make a replica bridge that was higher than the original one, in order to be able to play (and hear sounds other than clicking) above the 12th fret. Hence the cheese-cutter effect.

bratsche

bratsche
Feb-19-2010, 12:21am
I have Tomastiks, also, although I'm not sure what weight. They do a pretty good job of containing the shrillness. I've had a couple of rosewood Martin flatbacks and they were/are (still have one of 'em) far more suited to my tastes than the Weymann.

I would tend to agree with you, based on the one rosewood Martin I had the pleasure to try. That instrument was a a real gem! However, at what prices those things are going for, especially one in as good condition as my Weymann, it's far out of my reach. :crying:

bratsche

Mandoist
Feb-22-2010, 6:06am
Any idea of the current value of a Style #40 from the 1920s, in extremely good condition? Slightly worn condition (as in the photos in this thread)?

trapdoor2
Mar-18-2010, 9:25pm
Hi y'all...new here. I'm really a banjo player, but came over to do some mandolin info mining...

I have a #50 but the top is cracked and she needs some TLC to be playable...on my 'to do' list. :disbelief: I played a #30 for a few years back in the 1980's and always thought it had a sweet tone, very balanced. Not loud by any means but ideal for those quiet mornings out on the porch before everyone else has wakened.

===Marc

The Bard Rocks
Mar-22-2010, 10:45pm
I had a 20 for a short while, also played a 40 - and didn't like the sound of either. They played fine and were glorious to look at, but the sound was too mild to cut it. It blended in well with whoever I was playing with, but refused to stand out on its own. Kind of dead. Other players who tried it did not like it either. It was unanimous, not a keeper. And I love my Weymann open back 5 string and like my Weymann parlour guitar, so I was predisposed to like it too.

Roland, "The Bard Rocks"