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Tavy
Jul-05-2012, 5:41am
Here are a couple from my files. It is sort of difficult to tell whether they are just dark from age or stained dark. Both are Stridentes, neither of them are mine.

Not sure, but those look like dark-with-muck-of-ages rather than stained dark?

brunello97
Jul-05-2012, 3:35pm
Not sure, but those look like dark-with-muck-of-ages rather than stained dark?

Sounds like my mother, who never acknowledged a summer sun-tan. "That's ground-in dirt." Usually she was right.

Mick

brunello97
Jul-05-2012, 3:38pm
It is possible that the fellow in the photo with the darktop mandolin had a new fretboard added.

One of the Riccas I had, Jim, had a gorgeous dark-pumpkin colored top, a half-shade darker than Gibsons of the era. Also a heavy MOP band around the top like this. The headstock on this one doesn't look like any Ricca I have seen though. Nothing makes me think this is from LR, though.

Mick

Jim Garber
Jul-05-2012, 3:46pm
Yeah, Mick. Ricca did not occur to me either. Maybe a small custom shop of the period.

brunello97
Jul-05-2012, 6:06pm
The orchestra is from Camden, NJ. That's near Philadelphia isn't it? Wouldn't it be something if this was a Martucci?

Mick

wwwilkie
Jul-15-2012, 9:52am
I couldn't find this one on here anywhere but maybe it's already been posted.
I picked it up a few years back and it was paired with a great oversized photo of a mandolin orchestra (which I'm trying to locate). Anyone know anything about this? It would seem to be a poster that was used to advertise shows.

hank
Jul-15-2012, 9:58am
Loyd appears to be playing with an F4 with an F5 behind him.

wwwilkie
Jul-15-2012, 11:59am
I got this one when I had my shop in Britain. There were several old timers in my neighborhood who remembered him well. I'll include a link to a video.
http://www.britishpathe.com/video/troise-and-his-mandoliers-1

Jim Garber
Jul-15-2012, 8:41pm
Wyatt: There was a thread that Martin Jonas of Liverpool started about acquiring a bunch of original arrangements from Troise and his Mandoliers (http://www.mandolincafe.com/forum/showthread.php?74232-Troise-amp-His-Mandoliers-original-manuscript-scores).

wwwilkie
Jul-15-2012, 10:05pm
Wow, what an incredible thread! Thanks for the link Jim.

Arnt
Aug-09-2012, 7:33am
Came across this local treasure trove of vintage mandolin pictures. Its part of the "Digital Museum" program from various museums in this country, they have a section of pictures called "Mandolinen i Mitt Hjerte" (The Mandolin in My Heart). The site is only in Norwegian I'm afraid, but the pictures are the most interesting part anyways.

http://www.digitaltmuseum.no/folder/32

Here are a couple of examples

90175 90174

Rob Beck
Aug-09-2012, 7:40am
Hi Arnt,

I love the second one with the four girls with the bowl back mandolins, you don't often seem to see people smiling in older photos, but it really brings the picture to life - no need for an English translation there!

Rob

Ron McMillan
Aug-09-2012, 8:01am
Hi Arnt,

I love the second one with the four girls with the bowl back mandolins, you don't often seem to see people smiling in older photos, but it really brings the picture to life - no need for an English translation there!

Good observation Rob. The reason why people often looked very stiff and stern and unemotional in old photographs was that they required very long shutter speeds, so the subjects were well warned of the need to sit totally still for one or two or even more seconds.

The lovely photographs of the girls looks like it was shot in a situation either with a lot of light, or with artificial strobe lighting that would have frozen the image, allowing them to pose naturally.

ron

Jim Garber
Aug-09-2012, 8:57am
Nice site with some wonderful pics. I like this one with the reverse scroll mandolin and the early picture of Caspar the Friendly Ghost as a toddler :)

Tavy
Aug-10-2012, 3:36am
Nice site with some wonderful pics. I like this one with the reverse scroll mandolin and the early picture of Caspar the Friendly Ghost as a toddler :)

Great example of long-shutter-speed misery there - the guy with the smurf-head mando looks like he's just sat on a spike!

Jim Garber
Aug-10-2012, 6:00pm
Actually the baby being held by his mom on the right is also blurry of face.

brunello97
Aug-10-2012, 6:06pm
Actually the baby being held by his mom on the right is also blurry of face.

I guess they're too young to know what 'cheese' is. (Sagen sie käse is the best I can do.) Kind of scary to think that all those Norwegians really are smiling for the photo. ;)

I love the photo of the mando-fisarmonica duo. Right after mine own hjerte.

Mick

mandoisland
Sep-25-2012, 1:32am
I have extracted pictures of mandolin clubs form the Colorado College Yearbooks - you can find this in my tumblr:
http://mandoisland.tumblr.com/archive
Just click to the pictures of mandolin ensembles to get the complete post with additional pictures and the linkt to the source at archive.org.

Gregory Tidwell
Sep-25-2012, 2:11am
I have extracted pictures of mandolin clubs form the Colorado College Yearbooks - you can find this in my tumblr:
http://mandoisland.tumblr.com/archive
Just click to the pictures of mandolin ensembles to get the complete post with additional pictures and the linkt to the source at archive.org.

I think that's a great page, Michael, but my iPad hates it.

mandoisland
Sep-25-2012, 5:14am
I think that's a great page, Michael, but my iPad hates it.

You can try the main tumblr page:
http://mandoisland.tumblr.com/

Maybe this works better on the iPad.

JeffD
Sep-25-2012, 8:28am
Good observation Rob. The reason why people often looked very stiff and stern and unemotional in old photographs was that they required very long shutter speeds, so the subjects were well warned of the need to sit totally still for one or two or even more seconds.

There is another contributing factor: that dentistry was not what it is today.

JeffD
Sep-25-2012, 8:31am
We are living in exciting times, with all these old time pictures. So many universities and museums are digitizing their collections and making them available on line. All this wonderful stuff is being released that you once had to rummage through dusty archives to see. Future generations are going to take it for granted that all of this is avialable at the touch of a mouse.

dustyamps
Sep-25-2012, 9:02pm
Looks to be a Gibson A-2 in the photo.

Jim Garber
Feb-16-2013, 12:49pm
Here is a proud young mando with his Washburn Model 1125. The mandolin would have been around 1900.

Jim Garber
Feb-16-2013, 12:54pm
Looks like a dad and daughter. She is playing (I think) a carved top reverse scroll Regal/B&D and his guitar looks like an archtop May Bell.

billhay4
Feb-16-2013, 2:09pm
Her's looks brand new.
Bill

Jim Garber
Mar-04-2013, 9:37pm
I just received this amazing mandolin-guitar orchestra photo. Unfortunately it is in pretty lousy condition but rather than retouch the crack and all the other problems I just enhanced the color and contrast.

Most if not all the instruments look Italian to me. There seem to be a few Calace (model 13s?) mandolins. On the left is a mandocello and a liuto (5-course mandocello with an extra-low course) and on the right either a mandocello or a mandolone. I am not sure but my guess would be that they were made by Monzino. I love the oddball jester's cap headstock on the large instrument on the right.

It is also interesting that there are what look like two mandoliola (mandola tuned CGDA). In Europe most orchestras usually use the longer scale mandolas tuned one octave below the mandolin. It is possible that these are Italian immigrants in the US, who all bought Italian instruments possibly sold to them by the conductor/director/teacher in the middle front row.

hank
Mar-04-2013, 11:02pm
These photos make me want to wax and curl my moustache like Snidely Whiplash. Thanks for these windows into the past. My wife still knows from the old aroma when I open the case of our 1913 blackface A4 Boo.

Tavy
Mar-05-2013, 4:13am
Great photo Jim!

Like Hank I love those mustaches, not to mention the young ones at the front whose legs don't even touch the floor yet :)

There's some seriously large bowls in there too - most impressive!

Jim Garber
Mar-05-2013, 8:25am
I wish it was in better shape but then i would have had to pay a lot more. We can see just enough detail in it.

Graham McDonald
Mar-05-2013, 4:23pm
I just received this amazing mandolin-guitar orchestra photo. Unfortunately it is in pretty lousy condition but rather than retouch the crack and all the other problems I just enhanced the color and contrast.

Most if not all the instruments look Italian to me. There seem to be a few Calace (model 13s?) mandolins. On the left is a mandocello and a liuto (5-course mandocello with an extra-low course) and on the right either a mandocello or a mandolone. I am not sure but my guess would be that they were made by Monzino. I love the oddball jester's cap headstock on the large instrument on the right.

It is also interesting that there are what look like two mandoliola (mandola tuned CGDA). In Europe most orchestras usually use the longer scale mandolas tuned one octave below the mandolin. It is possible that these are Italian immigrants in the US, who all bought Italian instruments possibly sold to them by the conductor/director/teacher in the middle front row.

Great photo. The big instruments certainly don't look Neapolitan and I have never come across anything like the big thing on the right. That has to close to a 30" scale! Any idea of where the group is from?

g

Jim Garber
Mar-05-2013, 5:14pm
Great photo. The big instruments certainly don't look Neapolitan and I have never come across anything like the big thing on the right. That has to close to a 30" scale! Any idea of where the group is from?

Monzino is the closest I can guess (and that may not be all that close) -- I was basing it on the wild scratchplate shapes. OTOH it ism possible that these are flatback and not bowls. I just assumed that there was some sort of Italian connection since some of the mandolins looks like Calaces.

I welcome any of your guesses here, Graham.

There is some writing on the back but it is all but obliterated and unreadable.

Jim Garber
Mar-05-2013, 5:36pm
Here are a few other mandolones. Not sure of the makers on the first but the second is a Gelas made by Louis Patenotte (http://mediatheque.cite-musique.fr/masc/play.asp) and the third made in Japan by Noguchi.

From Gregg Miner's Mozzani page (http://harpguitars.net/blog/2013/02/the-mandolone-basso-a-mezza-lira/) in his blog:


The Mozzani plectrum orchestra family consists of:

Ottavino – scale (Diapason): 183mm, tuning: E6, A5, D5, G4 (like mandolin, but 1 octave higher)
Quartino – scale: 275mm, tuning: A5, D5, G4, C4
Mandolino – scale: 332mm, tuning: E5, A4, D4, G3
Contralto Mandola (soprano mandola) – scale: 394mm, tuning A4, D4, G3, C3 (this equates to our “tenor mandola”)
Tenore Mandola – scale: 440mm, tuning E4, A3, D3, G2 (this equates to our “octave mandola”…confusing, isn’t it?)
Mandoloncello – scale: 610mm, tuning A3, D3, G2, C2 or B1 (as our mandocello, with the low string variable)
Basso – scale: 734mm, tuning C3, G2, D2, A1 or E3, A2, D2, G1 (?)
Mandolone – equivalent to Basso?
Contrabasso da braccio (?) – scale 780mm, tuning C3, G2, D2, A1 or E3, A2, D2, G1 (?)(The three previous instruments are thus just different scales, sizes or forms, but the same pitch?)
Contrabasso – scale 990mm, tuning: E3, A2, D2, G1 (?)

Tavy
Mar-06-2013, 7:26am
Jim that blog post is great - harp guitars and mandolins galore, plus how about that "one octave higher than a mandolin" instrument - that must take some playing!

Jim Garber
Mar-06-2013, 8:29am
Ah, John, I can see it now... you are thinking of building an ottavino mandolin. Pretty strange with a ~7 inch scale. I guess it would be the same as a capo on the 12th fret of a standard mandolin.

Jim Garber
Mar-27-2013, 5:22pm
Yet another interesting photo -- the best part of this one is that the violinist seems to have combed his hair to resemble the headstock of the mandolin. it would have been fun if the guitarists hairdo matched the violin scroll. :)

brunello97
Mar-27-2013, 5:36pm
Maybe he's having a 'bad mandolin' day.

Mick

Jim Garber
Aug-22-2013, 11:07pm
This one is prob more interesting because of the zither in it rather than the mandolin. I was able to find an image that matched on Gregg Miner's page (http://www.minermusic.com/dolceola/fretless_zithers.htm) which he termed a harp-zither.

hank
Aug-23-2013, 7:55am
Post 286. Must be the Pomade.

"Everett: Hold on, now. I don't want this pomade. I want Dapper Dan.
Clerk: I don't carry Dapper Dan. I carry Fop.
Everett: Well, I don't want Fop, #%€%%. I'm a Dapper Dan man.
Clerk: You watch your language, young fella. This is a public market. If you want Dapper Dan, I can order it for you, have it in about two weeks.
Everett: Well ain't this place a geographical oddity! Two weeks from everywhere! Forget it! [slams money on the counter] I'll have a dozen hair nets."

bluesmandolinman
Aug-23-2013, 9:11am
Home of a moonshiner ? ;)

105849105850

Kerry Krishna
Aug-23-2013, 11:07am
Here is something from the Shlomo Pestcoe collection . I take these old photos to my light table and spend about 12 hour apiece on them ....

Kerry Krishna
Aug-23-2013, 11:09am
https://www.facebook.com/kerry.krishna/media_set?set=a.10151734605107347.1073741886.64703 7346&type=1And here is the Facebook thread on how all of it is done...

Jim Garber
Aug-29-2013, 9:23pm
All-women, all-Gibson mandolin quintet. The woman in the front middle looks either bored or sleepy or else she just got tired of sitting still for the long exposure.

billkilpatrick
Aug-30-2013, 2:36am
All-women, all-Gibson mandolin quintet. The woman in the front middle looks either bored or sleepy or else she just got tired of sitting still for the long exposure.

... could be she she'd been bopped in the head too many times with that mandocello.

Randi Gormley
Aug-30-2013, 9:26am
They got her mid-blink, I'm thinking. I want one of them dresses, myself.

hank
Aug-30-2013, 10:07am
They sure look happy to be there.

Jim Garber
Aug-30-2013, 12:56pm
This is why I love these old photos...I always wonder what was going thru their minds, what was going on in the room, what the relationship was between these women, etc. After all, these were people and musicians of close to 100 years ago.

hank
Aug-30-2013, 1:09pm
Each of them are holding their instrument in a way to show the Gibson on the headstock. This may be some early marketing attempts by a Gibson teacher/distributor to capitalize on the appeal and attention given to the fairer sex.

Jim Garber
Aug-30-2013, 1:23pm
The mandolin was very popular at the turn of the last century for the "fashionable girl":
106193

I found that newspaper article in an old tune book. I love the reference to "Vellacia."

BTW I was approached by an editor for a woman's guitar magazine called She Shreds (http://sheshredsmag.com/) and they are using a couple of my photos in an article in the current issue which includes "never-before-seen photographs of all-woman mandolin ensembles of the 20th century". I did not receive my copy as yet.

Tobin
Aug-30-2013, 2:29pm
Each of them are holding their instrument in a way to show the Gibson on the headstock. This may be some early marketing attempts by a Gibson teacher/distributor to capitalize on the appeal and attention given to the fairer sex.

Actually, quite the opposite. They are holding their mandolins the way mandolins are supposed to be held. The Gibson logo on the headstock was probably originally put at that angle so it would be horizontal when held properly.

hank
Aug-30-2013, 2:31pm
Ha, ha, Doleful to say the least. Thank Jim, for not only many windows into the past but also a bit of the mind set back then. I guess some things never change.

mrmando
Aug-30-2013, 2:32pm
Home of a moonshiner ? ;)

105849105850
Mama just wants to barrelhouse all night long...

hank
Aug-30-2013, 2:34pm
Tobin's quote"Actually, quite the opposite. They are holding their mandolins the way mandolins are supposed to be held. The Gibson logo on the headstock was probably originally put at that angle so it would be horizontal when held properly."

Are you commenting on the second row as well?

mrmando
Aug-30-2013, 2:38pm
whoops...

mrmando
Aug-30-2013, 2:40pm
... could be she she'd been bopped in the head too many times with that mandocello.
Maybe just enraptured by the solo she's playing...

Whaddaya think, late teens? Sleepy Gal's mandolin looks like a Sheraton brown A2. I don't see any truss rod covers. Looks like an A4 and an H2 in the back, another H2 on the right, plus the K1 mandocello.

It does seem as though the two in the back are trying to get their headstocks where the camera can pick them up, rather than maintaining the correct playing position.

hank
Aug-30-2013, 7:28pm
Maybe a faint looking Fleur de lis or some sort of inlay on the back right instrument?

brunello97
Aug-31-2013, 12:01am
Whaddaya think, late teens? ....

I was going to guess a decade earlier. We could use someone on board who knows fashion (and shoes) from this era to help with IDs like this. Those dresses don't look post WWI to me, but they could be from a sartorially less-up-to-date part of the country, despite their very modern instruments.

Mick

billkilpatrick
Aug-31-2013, 2:44am
jim - do you have the original photo? if so, is there a photographer's stamp or whatever on the back? the horse-faced lady in the front row, on the far right of the photo looks just like my maternal grandmother, who lived in southern ohio.

Pasha Alden
Aug-31-2013, 3:04am
Very interesting. Naturally my husband has to describe the pictures to me but it is interesting. I would not hazard a guess though.
A query though: are some of these pictures with a copyright? It is just that we have a hobbies fair every year in Grahamstown and I would love to use some of these pictures as part of my mandolin exhibition for my table. Naturally not passing these off as my own.

Any advice?

Jim Garber
Aug-31-2013, 8:50am
Maybe a faint looking Fleur de lis or some sort of inlay on the back right instrument?

All the mandolins except for the middle front one have fleurs-de-lis on the headstocks.


I was going to guess a decade earlier. We could use someone on board who knows fashion (and shoes) from this era to help with IDs like this. Those dresses don't look post WWI to me, but they could be from a sartorially less-up-to-date part of the country, despite their very modern instruments.

Decade earlier, like 1908? I would say maybe 1912-1915 for the mandolins.


jim - do you have the original photo? if so, is there a photographer's stamp or whatever on the back? the horse-faced lady in the front row, on the far right of the photo looks just like my maternal grandmother, who lived in southern ohio.

I do own the photo, recently acquired, but there are no markings anywhere on the mounting or back.


A query though: are some of these pictures with a copyright? It is just that we have a hobbies fair every year in Grahamstown and I would love to use some of these pictures as part of my mandolin exhibition for my table. Naturally not passing these off as my own.

I generally only post photos that I own unless I credit the source otherwise. Let me know if you want to use any of mine and I can send you a higher resolution version than appears here, if you like.

brunello97
Aug-31-2013, 10:42am
Decade earlier, like 1908?

Mas o menos, (apparently less) but I'm guessing from the clothing not the mandolins. :) I'm sure I can't distinguish between a 1908 and a 1912 Gibson. It would be great to learn just what those comps would be.

It dawned on me this morning, though, that perhaps the women were dressing up in older style clothes for the purpose of the photo? The decor, paintings, bamboo screen all look pretty vintage for 1915. The mandos would clearly date it though. They were the high tech implements here.

For some reason I had the impression that in the '10s women's fashions were opening and starting reflect a bit more cosmopolitan influence in advance of the '20s. (Arts and Crafts movement, Art Nouveau, etc.) Who knows, however, where this photo was taken and how modern these women were in their fashion sense (as opposed to their mandolin choices.) That headband does look pretty radical. I'm really stabbing in the dark on this, I know.

'10s Women's Fashions (http://hubpages.com/hub/Women-and-Fashions-of-the-World-War-I-Era-Clothing-of-1914-1920)

Mick

stevenmando
Aug-31-2013, 10:56am
Great photos but did you know that in 100 to 200 years from now there are going to be photos of us with our mandolins saying mandolin players from the golden age of mandolin music so smile

bmac
Aug-31-2013, 11:53pm
This is why I love these old photos...I always wonder what was going thru their minds, what was going on in the room, what the relationship was between these women, etc. After all, these were people and musicians of close to 100 years ago.

Of course these photos were taken in blinding natural light usually coming through huge sky lights with long poses lasting as long as a minute in some cases... Thus the extremely rigid poses. I suspect that going through most of their minds was "When is this going to stop???"

I used to rent an old photographers studio on the top of an old (1890s) nine story building... The skylight was roughly 25 ft wide and about 25 ft high rising to the peak of the roof. The shades to control light were long ago rotted away so during the daytime the light (even on a cloudy day) was overwhelming. in the sunshine it was unbearable. I could only use it at night but at night it looked and felt like Dr. Frankensteins workshop... During a lightening storm lightening was striking the metal roof only a few feet away because it was the highest building in the area.... I have never again experienced such noise and sheer terror.

Backlineman
Sep-06-2013, 8:27pm
The Gibson related Mandolin Orchestra's of the teens and twenties were an important part of the Gibson sales and marketing channel, and I also have a theory that target marketing to women both young and old was also a big part of the strategy. I have yet to come across any solid documentation directly from any Gibson materials, but the similarities across hundreds of these Gibson group photos point to some sort of Gibson guidelines or standards recommended when taking these photos. I'm quite sure this photo was taken in accordance with Gibson sales or marketing guide lines or standards, and was intended for publication in a Gibson catalog. Almost without exception, the women pictured in hundreds of these catalog photos I've reviewed are 1) wearing white, if not head to toe, certainly the tops, 2) always fretting some sort of cord, and 3) positioned so that most of the instrument and certainly head stock is visible. This one has all the characteristics of a Gibson Catalog photo, which may or may not have been published. I'll look and see if these ladies show up any of the teens or twenties catalogs, and if so they will, as always, be identified with a group name, and a location.

mrmando
Sep-10-2013, 11:41am
Decade earlier, like 1908? I would say maybe 1912-1915 for the mandolins.
OK, I took a closer look at the quintet photo. That's not an H2 on the right front, it's an A4. Same goes for the one in the rear left. Probably both blackface.

Until 1914, A4s did not have fretboard extensions. And since both of these A4s have fretboard extensions, we can confidently say that the photo cannot have been taken earlier than 1914.

My earlier guess of late teens was based on my belief that the A2 in the center was Sheraton brown, a color not used before 1918. But given the lighting, I can't be sure of that. It could be a pumpkin top.

If the instruments were all new when the photo was taken, it would HAVE to be 1914, because the A2 was out of production from then until 1918, when it came back in Sheraton brown.

Jim Garber
Sep-10-2013, 2:12pm
Interesting calculations, Martin. Makes sense to me. Did the mandolas always have the extensions?

mrmando
Sep-10-2013, 2:19pm
Great question. The two earliest mandolas with photos in the Archive do not appear to have extensions. 7790 is the third mandola pictured, and it does have an extension.

I still think that might be an H2 mandola in back on the right in your photo.

Jim Garber
Sep-10-2013, 2:29pm
Yeah, I wish those ladies in the front were a little shorter so we could see more detail. Hard to judge the sizes, too, since optics of lenses might have distorted sizes in the back.

mrmando
Sep-10-2013, 2:37pm
I dunno ... you can compare the nut-to-12th-fret distance on both instruments in the back and they look the same to me, so maybe those are both A4s after all.

Jim Garber
Sep-10-2013, 3:33pm
Interesting... 4 mandolins and one mandocello... I wonder what music they played?

hank
Sep-10-2013, 5:38pm
Charles Dana Gibson's stylized Nouveau Gibson Girl series seems to blend well with Gibson Mandolin marketing strategy which was only a reflection of popular culture of the Era.
Spann's shipping dates bump that back a bit further to 1913 for the mini Florida to show up. My A4 with m.florida s/n 20532 was traditionally dated as 1915 but was moved back to a 1913 shipping date. #14307 A4 trad. 1913 Spann 1911 no Florida. #17513 A4 trad.1914 Spann 1912 no Florida. #20162 and #20519 both A4 trad. 1915 Spann 1913 both have mini Florida.

Jim Garber
Sep-19-2013, 4:18pm
I have had this one for some time. I am not sure why I never posted it on this thread.

Jim Garber
Sep-29-2013, 9:33pm
I got this one a few weeks ago but was could not scan it since it is framed behind glass. So I took a photo but i is very hard to avoid the glare. This is the best I could do without taking the whole thing apart which i may do someday. Nice All-Gibson orchestra -- looks like most of the instruments were from the teens or early 1920s. I have no info on where this ensemble was based -- I might find out when I take it out of the frame.

Jim Garber
Dec-11-2013, 10:48pm
A few more to add to this thread. Here's a multi-instrumentalist guy with an intense look about him.

Jim Garber
Dec-11-2013, 10:49pm
I love this little snapshot of these three kids with the cigarbox fiddle, flute and mandolin.

Jim Garber
Dec-11-2013, 10:51pm
Lastly this mostly Gibson (at least the guitars and mandolins) orchestra. Hard to tell what the banjos are -- they are not exactly in focus in the back. Possibly some Vegas.

I wonder how that sole bowlback player feels about not playing a Gibson like everyone else.

Tavy
Dec-12-2013, 5:47am
Lastly this mostly Gibson (at least the guitars and mandolins) orchestra. Hard to tell what the banjos are -- they are not exactly in focus in the back. Possibly some Vegas.

I wonder how that sole bowlback player feels about not playing a Gibson like everyone else.

Left out I bet - what's the betting she's playing a hand-me-down from her parents after they upgraded to Gibsons?

brunello97
Dec-12-2013, 7:23am
I wonder how that sole bowlback player feels about not playing a Gibson like everyone else.

Maybe she's feeling smug and self satisfied that she isn't playing one of those 'slabs of timber' (or whatever bowlback die hards were referring to Gibson mandolins as.) She's playing a bowlback because it has the traditional, more appropriate sound for the classical music the orchestra is playing. She's saving for an Embergher. ;)

Mick

Bertram Henze
Dec-12-2013, 7:41am
I wonder how that sole bowlback player feels about not playing a Gibson like everyone else.

I hope she knew about Hans Christian Andersen...

http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/The_Ugly_Duckling_1491.jpg

peterk
Dec-14-2013, 6:22pm
A street/village singer/mandolin player with his appreciative audience, probably in Europe, I'd guess in the very early 1900s.

111068

peterk
Dec-14-2013, 6:36pm
Young ladies used to like playing the mandolin, and they also loved getting those obligatory photos with the mandolin.

111069

Tavy
Dec-15-2013, 3:46am
A street/village singer/mandolin player with his appreciative audience, probably in Europe, I'd guess in the very early 1900s.

111068

I'm glad we don't have to dress up like that any more!

Jake Wildwood
Dec-15-2013, 12:20pm
Forget the mando -- that fence is great!

peterk
Dec-15-2013, 12:50pm
OK, on that picture of mine, you see an elderly grey bearded gent. What does he seem to hold in his left hand ?:grin:
Now, can you spot anyone talking on their cell phone ?:))

Bertram Henze
Dec-15-2013, 1:07pm
Now, can you spot anyone talking on their cell phone ?:))

The man with the bowler on the far right is clearly about to place a bluetooth headset in his ear...

peterk
Dec-15-2013, 1:32pm
Right on, Bertram......our 21st century vision/perception is tainted by the current technological gadgetry.

Bertram Henze
Dec-16-2013, 2:04am
our 21st century vision/perception is tainted by the current technological gadgetry.

Talking about gadgetry - does the player have a Shubb capo on his mandolin, 2nd fret? :disbelief:

Tavy
Dec-16-2013, 4:48am
Talking about gadgetry - does the player have a Shubb capo on his mandolin, 2nd fret? :disbelief:

Looks like it, and the mandolin is flat top and back (not canted top or typically Italian).

He also appears to have no pick in his fingers - if you look his thumb is away from the other fingers.

Staged photo???? :mandosmiley:

Jim Garber
Jan-30-2014, 10:20pm
I like the richness of this image and the central parts of all the hairstyles. The only marking is "Fort Wayne, Indiana" written on the back of the board in pencil, but I am not sure if that writing is recent. The board itself doesn't look all that old.

What chord or notes is the mustached guy playing?

Bertram Henze
Jan-31-2014, 3:34am
What chord or notes is the mustached guy playing?

It's a setup - the mustached guy is Tim Hart of Steeleye Span :whistling:

http://themusicsover.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/12/tim-hart.jpg

Jim Garber
Jan-31-2014, 10:08am
Thanks, Bertram... you may be right?

delsbrother
Feb-01-2014, 5:02am
That chair is outrageous!

Jim Garber
Feb-02-2014, 3:27pm
Hah! I didn't even notice the chair.

sgrexa
Feb-07-2014, 10:21am
Just stumbled upon this on Ebay. 75 years young and rocking the cello with no strap!?

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Jim Garber
Feb-07-2014, 10:50am
Very cool, Sean!

Bill Snyder
Feb-07-2014, 12:01pm
This thread is about to celebrate its tenth birthday (or would it be anniversary?).

Jim Garber
Feb-07-2014, 12:18pm
We should take a picture of all who contributed and check it out about 100 years from now.

Bill Snyder
Feb-07-2014, 5:36pm
Jim you can stick around and check it out in 100 years but I plan on being long gone from here by then. :)

Jim Garber
Feb-08-2014, 4:06pm
Nah, I will prob be with you in that nice warm place, playing hot mandolin licks.:)

peterk
Feb-14-2014, 6:24pm
(1) Hamburg, Germany, cc 1917
(2) Italian army officers at play, cc 1890
(3) Town mandolin band, Italy, 1920s or 1930s.
(4) Family reunion photo with three musicians, Lucca, Italy, cc 1920
(5) Germany, cc 1915
(6) Germany, cc 1935
(7) Germany, cc 1920


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peterk
Feb-14-2014, 8:37pm
Somewhere in Europe in 1930s, I guess. A happy mandolinist surrounded by happy friends/family.

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peterk
Feb-15-2014, 8:38am
In the photo below, Guiseppe Branzoli (1835-1909,http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giuseppe_Branzoli) is shown seated, and he holds an old mandolone/lute possibly converted to a guitar.
The photo was taken in Rome in 1889 on occasion of an important concert given by players who used antique instruments for that performance.
Branzoli was a noted mandolin pedagogue, and he authored a mandolin method book.

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peterk
Feb-16-2014, 12:46pm
Germany in 1930s. Perhaps an office party or some sorta club get together/celebration ?

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Bertram Henze
Feb-16-2014, 1:35pm
Germany in 1930s. Perhaps an office party or some sorta club get together/celebration ?

Looks like some photographer was hired for a combined mandolin orchestra/choir performance. The instruments are motley crew - a guitar and a waldzither in the second row, a banjo in the first. I guess the people played whatever was available - this was an economically difficult and chaotic time, on the eve of utter darkness.

dustyamps
Feb-23-2014, 12:15am
Gibson ad in Dec 1921 Popular Science Monthly

Backlineman
Apr-21-2014, 1:57pm
Is a photo from 1963 an Antique photo?
While visiting my parents recently I came across this photo taken by my mom in maybe 1963? Me at around 2 years old "rocking out" to my dad playing my great grandfather's 1914 F4. My dad is now 83 years young, and still plays mandolin quite a bit with several groups. As for the 1914 F-4, I've been playing and taking care of it for the last 5 years or so.
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Jim Garber
Apr-21-2014, 2:18pm
Great photo, Backlineman! I love the rocking horse, the cowboy outfit and the TV. I wonder if your dad was playing some Sons of the Pioneers tune. I also like your blog -- fantastic that you have such a vital familial connection to a mandolin orchestra. I look fwd to reading more on your blog.

mrmando
May-14-2014, 2:23pm
Here's one currently up on eBay. What a killer torch & wire F4. Dated Christmas 1913; maybe Santa gave him the mandolin?
http://www.ebay.com/itm/1913-Mandolin-Signed-IDd-Vintage-Photograph-Art-Moderne-Portraiture-E-Brunel-/121341947011?pt=Art_Photo_Images&hash=item1c408b2c83
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DavidKOS
Dec-13-2014, 7:02pm
Lastly this mostly Gibson (at least the guitars and mandolins) orchestra. Hard to tell what the banjos are -- they are not exactly in focus in the back. Possibly some Vegas.

I wonder how that sole bowlback player feels about not playing a Gibson like everyone else.


Maybe she's feeling smug and self satisfied that she isn't playing one of those 'slabs of timber' (or whatever bowlback die hards were referring to Gibson mandolins as.) She's playing a bowlback because it has the traditional, more appropriate sound for the classical music the orchestra is playing. She's saving for an Embergher. ;)

Mick

Old thread, just found it...love that bit of interchange.

Great pictures on the whole thread.

Markob
Dec-17-2014, 12:06am
http://s645.photobucket.com/user/eiwobom/media/000_1264.jpg.html

Doughboy Power Trio.

Can't really see the Mandolin very well. My grandfather Knox Owen is on the right with the guitar and stogie. Somewhere in France 1918.

JEStanek
Dec-17-2014, 8:58am
Markrob, I tried to tidy this up a bit....
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Jamie

Markob
Dec-17-2014, 11:39am
Thank you Jamie! I'm such a rookie. Didn't realize I'd throw my whole photobucket album on the post.

Angrywidower
Dec-21-2014, 10:40pm
Neat. As a bassist-guitarist,playing the mandolin is fun.I am used to eadg tuning so having the mandolin being gdae is fun for me. A delight is too weak a word for playing the mandolin. Wonderful or awesome is more appropriate.Be blessed and have a beautiful holidays all.

rubydubyr
Dec-21-2014, 10:52pm
Gibson ad in Dec 1921 Popular Science Monthly

$5/month pays for it, wonder how many months and what the downpayment was....