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Greg Stec
Jun-06-2009, 11:18pm
http://bernunzio.com/products/0913508
Check out this piece of work.
And I thought the mandolin shaped like a harp was over the top.
I have no interest in it.
'Cept maybe to hang a picture of it on a wall.

Skip Kelley
Jun-07-2009, 6:22am
Scary! That adds a new meaning to "Two-pointer"!:grin:

Michael Gowell
Jun-07-2009, 12:50pm
Cool folk art. It's a tiple, isn't it? 4 courses of 2,3,3,2 strings. I heard one fingerpicked & it sort of sounded like a small 12 string guitar.

Chris Keth
Jun-07-2009, 6:21pm
Cool folk art. It's a tiple, isn't it? 4 courses of 2,3,3,2 strings. I heard one fingerpicked & it sort of sounded like a small 12 string guitar.

That one has courses of 2, 2, 3, 3 (going in order GDAE), but it's strung like a normal mandolin now.

jeff mercer
Jun-07-2009, 6:47pm
I'm pretty sure Jim Garber has posted a pic of one of these ( or possibly this actual one ?) sometime ago, but can't recall which section of the Cafe it was on..

Jim ?

Pete Martin
Jun-07-2009, 10:30pm
Can be used as an anchor as well!:)):)):))

Bill Snyder
Jun-07-2009, 10:37pm
I'm pretty sure Jim Garber has posted a pic of one of these ( or possibly this actual one ?) sometime ago, but can't recall which section of the Cafe it was on..

Jim ?

Post a Picture section. Thread titled Mandolin Oddities. (http://www.mandolincafe.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1137&page=12&highlight=oddities)

jeff mercer
Jun-07-2009, 11:02pm
Yep, that's the one..many thanks for that, Bill...

Looks like the very same instrument...so if you were paddling your canoe, & needed to drop this "anchor", you'd have to put down your "Lloyd Oar" first, no ? :grin:

You gonna go check it out, Allen ?

allenhopkins
Jun-07-2009, 11:26pm
You gonna go check it out, Allen ?

Can't use it as an anchor, since I presume it floats; I could fill it with quick-drying concrete or lead shot, to decrease buoyancy, but I feel that might reduce its projection -- acoustic projection, that is...

In a word, "no." Gotta admit I felt a momentary MAS flash when I saw it, visualizing myself pulling it out of the case (what case?) at a jam, evoking astonishment, disbelief, ridicule, ostracism, perhaps involuntary commitment to a psychiatric facility nearby...

And it's at least possible that I might stop by John B's and try a strum or two, but of all the freaky mandolin mutations I've seen, this nears the top of the list. I do own a lot of mandolins, but I insist that they have a musical reason for existence -- which, I fear, is lacking in this one, much more suited to Barnacle Bill than Bill Monroe.

(Hmmm -- wonder what he's asking for it...)

Jim Garber
Jun-08-2009, 6:59am
It was on eBay last week with a reserve. I had emailed the seller and he told me that he had an offer of $1200 but wanted $1500. I assume that John B got it for somewhere in there since the auction was ended early. I would think John would want considerably more, I would guess in between $2000-3000.

That is an odd one tho. I thought it was a tiple or a 10 string mandola too but the tailpiece is only for 8 pegs and looks original -- whatever that means. The seller thought that the extra pegs were for decoration which is a little odd, but so is this one.

Jim MacDaniel
Jun-08-2009, 10:20am
So that must be one of those Navy style mandolins I've been hearing about.

JeffD
Jun-08-2009, 10:34am
Look at the one in the back on the right.

tortuga
Jun-08-2009, 1:42pm
This was indeed an interesting mando. The company's website had several other enticing instruments. Has anyone ever purchased one from Bernunzio Uptown Music Store in New York? I am not familiar with them. Thanks :mandosmiley:

allenhopkins
Jun-08-2009, 5:16pm
This was indeed an interesting mando. The company's website had several other enticing instruments. Has anyone ever purchased one from Bernunzio Uptown Music Store in New York? I am not familiar with them.

Bought a bunch of stuff from John. He, Dave Stutzman and Bernie Lehmann are the triumvirate of vintage dealers in Rochester NY. John's got a fabulous store, and a good selection; he deals internationally and frequently over the internet. Dave and Bernie are more walk-in stores; Bernie's also a well-respected luthier. In the past few months I've purchased an Eastman DGM-1 and a Tom Morgan Autoharp from John, and a Gold Tone Marcy Marxer cello banjo and an Eastman mandocello from Dave. All good people with whom to deal.

tortuga
Jun-08-2009, 7:49pm
Thanks for the glowing report, Allen. I always like the input I get from our friends on this website. I'll feel better about working with them now. :mandosmiley:

allenhopkins
Jun-23-2009, 8:06pm
OK, I was walking down East Avenue in Rochester after staffing the Education Foundation booth at the Jazz Festival, passing by Bernunzio's, when I saw John B waving at me through the window, beckoning me in to try out the anchor-shaped mandolin. He'd read the Cafe postings about it, and wanted me to give a short report to the (several) interested Cafe-ers who might consider buying it.

So: I played it for maybe five minutes. It is a real instrument, not just a display item. It wasn't tuned up to standard pitch, and the strings were ancient, but in decent relative tune. It was strung as a mandolin-family instrument, only eight strings; the two pegs in the center of the headstock were stringless.

Very deep body, shorter-scale neck. Lots of volume. Seems relatively accurately fretted, though I think that some fret leveling would be in order. Decent action. Tubby, boomy sound. A grizzly bear to tune, since it has ungeared friction pegs. I struggled quite a bit, settled for "not too out-of-tune." No clue as to what type of instrument it was originally (10-string, four-course mandolin? Tiple? Mandolin-mandola hybrid?). Workmanlike craftsmanship, not finely made, but quite acceptable.

I wouldn't consider it as a real, playable instrument. The friction pegs, which John B estimates are 1895 patent, are impossible to use with any facility. Replacing them with geared pegs, such as Pegheds or planetary banjo tuners, would make it really headstock-heavy and would take up a lot more room. I'd think of it as a novelty, mainly for display and an occasional demonstration to your astounded friends. Still, it's surely unique, and for the mandolinist who has everything...