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mrmando
Apr-18-2009, 11:39am
Maybe this seller just has tiny hands, but this Gibson (http://washingtondc.craigslist.org/doc/msg/1122547364.html) appears to have mandola proportions even though the seller says it's a mandolin.

On the other hand, it has a nonextended fretboard, and I thought even the H1 had the little fretboard extension.

Seller's misinformed about a few other things: it's not from 1898 and it isn't worth $4K, especially since it's missing the tailpiece cover and original bridge and has someone's name carved in the top.

barney 59
Apr-18-2009, 11:44am
Yes, way too hefty of a price and am I dislexic or is it a lefty?

mrmando
Apr-18-2009, 12:05pm
It's a webcam photo, so everything is reversed.

John Rosett
Apr-18-2009, 2:53pm
I think that H-1 and H-2 mandolas from the "pre-Loar" era had the little fingerboard extention on the treble side.

journeybear
Apr-19-2009, 1:08am
I think that H-1 and H-2 mandolas from the "pre-Loar" era had the little fingerboard extention on the treble side.

You are correct, sir. Here is my 1916 H-2. It's only two more frets, but there it is.

On the label there are two patent dates: "Feb. 1, '98" and "March 30, '06." The pickguard bracket, as everyone knows, is patented July 4, 1911. The seller is using the oldest date in some effort to increase the instrument's age, thus antique value. I'm sure someone here knows when the next patent renewal date was.

Any durn fool - other than the seller - knows the date proves that the instrument was built after the latest date. In fairness, though, it is possible that that 2/1/98 date is the only one on the label, which would make it older than 3/30/06. But not likely. ;)

mrmando
Apr-19-2009, 3:41am
What's interesting about the fretboard extension is that A4s didn't have them until after 1914, but I haven't found any photos of an H1 or H2 without one, even before 1914.

Anyway, yeah -- what we have here is a mid-teens A-style mandolin and a seller with small hands.

mrmando
Apr-21-2009, 8:42pm
To balance things out, as it were, here (http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=110380320828&ssPageName=ADME:B:BODO:US:1) is an instrument listed as a mandola that clearly isn't.

No fretboard extension and no headstock inlay. If it were a 1915 H1 it would have both.

allenhopkins
Apr-21-2009, 9:26pm
To balance things out, as it were, here (http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=110380320828&ssPageName=ADME:B:BODO:US:1) is an instrument listed as a mandola that clearly isn't.

According to the description, it "appears to have been restrung at one time." Most of my instruments have the same appearance.

mrmando
Apr-21-2009, 9:49pm
Heck, most of mine have been restrung more than one time!

barney 59
Apr-21-2009, 10:09pm
I wasn't sure about the fingerboard extension on the H1 so I did a search and found that most of the H1's in my search had fingerboard extensions ---but some didn't.

journeybear
Apr-21-2009, 11:15pm
According to the description, it "appears to have been restrung at one time." Most of my instruments have the same appearance.

Once again, a zinger from the mando accumulator so dry it could have been a martini!

The seller's description is a delight, very instructive in some things not to say when trying to sell an instrument.

The back of the instrument is lifting at the glue seems.

Actually, it has lifted. And so long ago the bout has bowed out.

the tail piece looks to be a replacement.

The tail piece cover could use replacing.

There is no bowing on this instrument,

This is true. Most people would use a pick. (OK, that was a cheap shot, but I couldn't resist.)

This is not a totally bad instrument, it has lots of potential.

Actually, this instrument is in pretty bad shape. Pretty cheeky to be asking $850.

I can't help but wonder, what happened to the inlay around the soundhole?

And why take a picture of the label that comes just short of showing the serial number?

mrmando
Apr-21-2009, 11:15pm
I wasn't sure about the fingerboard extension on the H1 so I did a search and found that most of the H1's in my search had fingerboard extensions ---but some didn't.
Interesting. Could you kindly post a photo of an H1 with no fretboard extension? Would love to see it.

mrmando
Apr-22-2009, 2:28am
Answered my own question: the 2 earliest mandolas in the Mandolin Archive do not have fretboard extensions. No. 7790, dating to 1907, is the first one there depicted with an extension.

But both the instruments we've looked at in this thread have all the characteristics of mid-teens mandolins and are clearly not pre-1907.

I made an offer on the eBay instrument before taking a close look and realizing it wasn't a mandola. When it is repaired it might be worth $850. Until then, not so much.