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bobbyD
Jan-30-2008, 11:41pm
Well, after reading all the pro's and con's from everyone's past posts...I decided to take the plunge. No Regrets. I finished it with pure tung oil.
Don't get me wrong...I'm not exactly someone who needed to do this to achieve a new level, (let's just say speed is a very strong word) but I really do like the feel of it. Heck, I maybe even like the look of it. Cheers.

bobbyD
Jan-30-2008, 11:50pm
Can't figure out this attachment thing....

Baron Collins-Hill
Jan-31-2008, 12:05am
nicely done. at first i thought the first picture was the finished prduct and i was a bit concerned, but it looks great.

b

jimbob
Jan-31-2008, 9:36am
whew .... ditto on the 1st photo
looks good

mandopete
Jan-31-2008, 10:24am
So how exactly did you remove the finish?

bobbyD
Jan-31-2008, 12:59pm
Yeah, I guess it is kinda scarey looking at just the first picture. That's funny.
I took the finish off with 200 grit sand paper. I Taped off the binding of the fretboard and part of the neck and went to town. I finished it with 1000 grit, then used OOOO steel wool to rub in the tung oil. Three coats.

bkhooper
Jan-31-2008, 1:21pm
I too was worried after seeing the first shot but the finished product looks great!! It gives your mandolin that old vintage, played in look. What kind of mandolin is that?

bobbyD
Jan-31-2008, 2:06pm
It's an Eastman 815. I like it. The only thing I don't like is the thick glossy finish.
Thanks for the comments.

Mando Andy G
Feb-01-2008, 4:05pm
One of my friends has had this done to his, when I've played it i really like the feel, but I'm afraid to pull the trigger on mine....For those of you whose had it done, is it worth it?

Mark Walker
Feb-01-2008, 4:09pm
I'd suggest it's purely personal preference. #My fiddle had the finish removed and that doesn't bother me at all; my mandolin has its finish on the neck and that doesn't bother me either. #

I know a few people who've removed theirs and liked it, and others who didn't. #The mandolin player in our band prefers that her custom-made mandolin 'keep' the finish, but if it gets a bit 'sticky' in humid weather, she wears a silk billiards glove (with no fingers) to 'slide' around the neck more easily.

It's really all in what works for you! #http://www.mandolincafe.net/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif

PS - Looks like you did a fine job removing your finish - once you get past the first photo of it!

JEStanek
Feb-01-2008, 4:12pm
I like that "after" picture. That Eastman has some nice wood in it. Good job.

Jamie

bobbyD
Feb-02-2008, 12:52pm
Closetmandolinplayer,
I'd be curious to know what your friends who didn't like it thought. Was it because they didn't like the look of it, or feel? To me it seems hard to believe that someone wouldn't like the feel of it. It's fantastic.
I also believe that it's purely personal preference. If you hate the look of it or are worried that someone won't want to buy one like it...then don't do it. If you don't care about those things...then I'd highly recommend it. Plus it's even kind of fun to have a Mando that you did some "custom" work to.

Mark Walker
Feb-02-2008, 1:53pm
Closetmandolinplayer,
I'd be curious to know what your friends who didn't like it thought. #Was it because they didn't like the look of it, or feel? #To me it seems hard to believe that someone wouldn't like the feel of it. #It's fantastic. #
I also believe that it's purely personal preference. #If you hate the look of it or are worried that someone won't want to buy one like it...then don't do it. #If you don't care about those things...then I'd highly recommend it. #Plus it's even kind of fun to have a Mando that you did some "custom" work to.

bobbyD - I really couldn't speculate or say for sure. #I know one individual whose - for lack of a better term - 'body chemistry' is such that whatever they play, they get 'stickiness' up and down the neck - with or without a finish. #Some - as you alluded to - don't like the 'lack of a finish', and one even removed the finish and wanted it refinished. #

And also - like we agree on - it's personal preference. #I don't 'scream' up and down the neck when and however I play, and don't 'stick' to it either, so don't really notice any difference whatsoever. #However, others - as you've observed - like the 'slick' feel of a 'speed' neck and thus prefer it.

I will say that the number of mandolins I've observed with 'speed' necks or the finish removed (unlike fiddles) is probably only one instrument in 75. #That may vary from region to region or jam to jam, but they're not overly numerous in my (limited) experience.

It's all just different strokes for different folks! # #http://www.mandolincafe.net/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/mandosmiley.gif

woodwizard
Feb-02-2008, 2:28pm
This is the speed neck of my old Gibson L7 archtop ... stripped and w/tung oil finish. Smooth feeling.

Mando Andy G
Feb-02-2008, 11:12pm
Awesome! thanks everyone who put in their input....now its time to get to the grindin' stone!!!

bobbyD
Feb-03-2008, 11:56am
Woodwizard-that looks real nice. Is it really that dark, or is it just the picture angle? Is there a stain on it?

woodwizard
Feb-03-2008, 11:50pm
bobbyD,
That is the original stain from Gibson that was left on it after I stripped the finish off. It may have gotten a little lighter actually. I think the pic does it pretty good justice of how it actually looks. Thanks

woodwizard
Feb-04-2008, 12:02am
Here's a shot of the whole back. Shows all the stained areas better.

AlanN
Feb-04-2008, 10:05am
bobbyD,

Nice outcome and good, simple description of the how-to-do-it. I have been tempted, but once done, it's DONE!

Wilson
Feb-04-2008, 1:40pm
Though I am a very slow player, I specified a "speed" neck on the mandola Andy Poe is making for me. I bought his #2 mandolin used and it came with a "speed" neck, which just feels great, almost sensual, some better than varnish and a lot better than lacquer.

Joe F
Feb-04-2008, 3:32pm
I'm seriously considering such a neck finish (or lack thereof) on a new mandolin Austin Clark is building for me. #I usually have trouble with sticky necks in warm weather, although for some reason the heavy gloss finish on my old Japanese Kentucky KM-200S has never been a problem.

Tom C
Feb-04-2008, 4:02pm
I thought "speed" neck refered to one that was slightly skinnier in the width where the pairs are closer and thus quicker to go from one string to another.

bobbyD
Feb-04-2008, 6:51pm
Hmmm... I've not heard that before. But then again I'm brand new to this world and it very well could mean that. I've only seen it as referring to taking the finish off though.

buddyellis
Feb-04-2008, 6:58pm
I absolutely prefer little to no finish on my instrument necks. For me, it REALLY makes a difference, especially in the summer when the humidity is up.

Mr. Loar
Feb-05-2008, 12:42pm
I did that to my Anto Schuster upright bass and it turned out great. I was told to use linseed oil on the bass. Linseed oil is nasty stuff. I have some real tung oil left over from oiling all the cedar boards in my house.

Mando Andy G
Feb-15-2008, 10:27am
For those of you who have it done can you post pics?
Thanks

billhay4
Feb-15-2008, 12:55pm
I did that to my Anto Schuster upright bass and it turned out great. I was told to use linseed oil on the bass. Linseed oil is nasty stuff. I have some real tung oil left over from oiling all the cedar boards in my house.

I have trouble understanding this statement and wish you'd elaborate. Both linseed oil and tung oil are the products of pressed plant material. In linseed oil, it's flax seeds that are pressed. With tung oil, it's the nuts (or seed from the nuts) of the tung tree.
Linseed oil is used as a nutritional supplement by some people. This doesn't mean it isn't nasty, but it suggests many think it's not.
When used on instruments, both are usually "boiled" or heated before being sold. This improves drying properties.
If there are driers added to the oil, then you have another matter.
Please elucidate.
Bill

Timbofood
Feb-15-2008, 1:03pm
Just a note, Linseed oil is available either boiled or raw at any art store that is worth it's salt. The raw is pretty..."Gooey" for a long time, the boiled will be less so in a much shorter time. Oh, and for an interesting fact to know wnd share:
Canola oil is also known as "Rape seed oil" could not sell it to any one but artists for years then the Canadian agriculture dept thought of CANola (from MAZola). Silly stuff to amaze your friends!

RevJB
Feb-15-2008, 1:44pm
So is there a difference between using pure tung oil or pure linseed oil for the neck?

duuuude
Feb-15-2008, 2:20pm
Well, I don't know about "boiled" and such, but my only experience with linseed oil left me thinking it wouldn't fare as well as tung oil since it stayed tacky for quite some time. I used light applications of tung oil periodically and it seemed to soak right in and was playable in no time, haven't had any problems yet.

billhay4
Feb-15-2008, 2:45pm
Boiled linseed oil and tung oil will be about the same on a neck. When dry, both should give a smooth, fast finish. Raw linseed oil is not suitable as it will take a long time to dry, if it ever does, and will remain sticky while it is drying.
Tung oil, however, is a much misused term in the finishing business. Many of the "tung oil" products are not pure tung oil at all and contain lots of other stuff. That doesn't, in itself, make them inappropriate for a mandolin neck. It just means you need to look carefully at what you're buying. Pure tung oil is hard to find and not often used. Most of what you get is, at the very least, polymerized (heated before being sold to thicken it and improve its drying time). It is usually thinned or has dryers added.
Bill