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WireBoy
Apr-03-2004, 7:17pm
All these mando pics are just delicious. #There's always a bit of background in these pics of shop table and/or tools. #The builders thread is always yakking about this tool and that.
#
Let's see how folks have arragned their work space for smooth workflow. Or how many obstacles one must overcome just to do a simple task. #Or show off a fancy new tool or jig.

Sorry I don't have a pic of my own to kick this off. #Right now i'm just a player not a builder, but the more i hang a round here, the more fun it sounds. #I may just have to give it a try soon. #

Post a away boys !

Marty Jacobson
Apr-04-2004, 4:46pm
Great idea, Eric... I'm intrigued to see how folk have their shops set up, as well.
Mine doesn't even pretend to attain to the slickness of John Garrity's. But it's definitely seen its share of sawdust.

http://www.martinjacobson.com/process/pix/home.jpg

(Though I wouldn't be surprised if it ends up looking more like this, at the end of a project... I somehow missed out on my Dad's Neatnik genes.)

http://www.martinjacobson.com/mess.jpg

Jim Hilburn
Apr-06-2004, 1:16pm
I'll see if I can help get this one off the ground.
This shop, which is part of a 700 sq.ft. addition on my house, was built by Drew Horton in exchange for mandolin #17. It was the first one I ever built for someone other than myself. Drew went on to win Winfield in 2001 with it.
Things to note are the guitar in pieces hanging in the corner. My first attempt at an electric guitar, and a disaster.A reminder to know what your doing before you do it. And the actual Sahara craps felt, to remind what a crap shoot it really is.

Yonkle
Apr-06-2004, 10:16pm
SHOP? Wish I had one. Here is where I have built 3 Mandolins...In my computer/flytying/Mandolin Making Room.
I stole my wifes butcher block from the kitchen for a bench and have all my tools packed around me in boxes.Blueprints and templates are under the couch, and the computer is on for building tips.
Kinda crude but it works, just a pain to clean up sawdust every day, and that one time I spilt the yellow stain all over the wall....thats another story! JD

zeke
Apr-07-2004, 1:13am
Now that I can size these pix, I feel like I just can't stop. So, even though I didn't have any really currant shots, I still had a few from last year, so here goes:

zeke
Apr-07-2004, 1:14am
here's another angle:

zeke
Apr-07-2004, 1:16am
Man, you guys with those immacculate shops, do they really look like that every day?

And last but hardly least:

Bobbie Dier
Apr-07-2004, 6:55am
This is a cool thread.

Dru Lee Parsec
Apr-07-2004, 10:41am
Here's the expansive and utterly extravagent estate of Brouelette Musical Instruments. Nearly 400 square feet of mess.

http://www.brouelette.com/dulcimer/images/shop1.jpg
http://www.brouelette.com/dulcimer/images/shop2.jpg

Dru Lee Parsec
Apr-07-2004, 10:42am
Can't post 4 photos in a single post, so here's the other half of the shop

http://www.brouelette.com/dulcimer/images/shop3.jpg
http://www.brouelette.com/dulcimer/images/shop4.jpg

During the day I get so much natural light through those windows that I don't have to turn the lights on. On warm days it's just a pleasure to work in there.

We came Too Dang Close to losing the shop during the San Diego Cedar Fire. Here's how close it came to us (http://www.brouelette.com/fire/index.html)

mandopete
Apr-07-2004, 6:09pm
Ha Ha Ha - I got ya'll beat.....here's my "shop"

(yes that's an electric guitar on the bench, I wouldn't dream of trying to build anything as complicated as a mandolin http://www.mandolincafe.net/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif )

zeke
Apr-07-2004, 6:32pm
Holy crap, Batman! That fire was soooooo close; glad to hear it was a near miss rather than a light hit.

Go play in your shop, Pete.

mandopete
Apr-08-2004, 8:47am
Go play in your shop, Pete.
Well maybe I'll just put on some pants and do just that! http://www.mandolincafe.net/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif

Dru Lee Parsec
Apr-08-2004, 10:50am
I should say that not only did I build those cabinets, but I built the whole darn shop! I dug the hole for the foundation, I framed the concrete forms. I hired somebody to pour the concrete (didn't feel like mixing about 2000 bags of cement by hand). I framed the walls and roof trusses, set the doors and windows (3 of the 5 windows and one of the 2 doors were recycled from when we remodeled our home. So I also had to build new door frames). I hired somebody else to put the roof shingles on ($330 including materials and it was done when I came home from work. What a deal!) I hired somebody else to do the rough and final electrical. I hung the drywall, did the mud work, and did the paint inside and out.

So yes, this really is MY shop. I put in the sweat and pain and money to build it and it's wonderful. http://www.mandolincafe.net/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/biggrin.gif

Russ(String-Alley)
Apr-08-2004, 5:23pm
That is awsome. You really did a great job. The planning you must have put into it really pays off from the look of those pics. It has everything spaced out real clean and correct for great mando ( or hell, ANYTHING) building. being able to create with your hands and tools is what they call true talent. I wish I was capable of even an 1/8 of that skill. That was some fire, how many folks by you lost thir homes? have any of the greens grown back at all?
Cheers!
Russ

Dru Lee Parsec
Apr-08-2004, 5:49pm
Thanks Russ:

The shop actually wasn't planned to be a specialty shop for any kind of woodworking. It was just the biggest shop (18x22) that I could talk my wife into lettting me build. http://www.mandolincafe.net/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif I only had one wall big enough to put my cabinets against so that's where they went. I needed a certain amount of clearence around the table saw so it went in the middle of the room. So the shop arrangement sort of "grew" to where things are now rather than coming together as a plan.


That was some fire, how many folks by you lost thir homes? have any of the greens grown back at all?

Over all of San Diego we lost about 1200 homes. One of the worse hit areas was just north of us about 5 miles in Scripps Ranch where they lost about 600 homes. I personally know of 4 people who lost their homes. When I went to a bluegrass jam up in the mountain town of Julian I met about a dozen more people who lost their homes. Julian lost about 300 homes in the fire.

Near the city the grass is growing back, but the mountains are desolate. It's all still black ash on the ground and the trees are either burnt black or have died from their trunks getting burned. There's a blackend area that runs from the 805 freeway in the west past the sunrise highway about 30 miles to the east. South to north it's about 20 miles wide so the whole burn area is roughly 20 miles by 30 miles. But that was one of 3 fires that were burning in San Diego in the same week not to mention the ones that were burning up in Los Angelos (That was a bad week). Overall Southern California lost about 1500 square miles of open space to the fires.

It's so surreal to drive through the moutains and see nothing but black sticks of trees on black ground all the way to the horizon.

WireBoy
Apr-09-2004, 1:08am
I'm glad the ball got rolling here. # its good to see the variety. #Mr Simpson has a spotless universe and poor Yonkle is builiding on the head of a pin.

Dru Lee P,
#Great looking shop to poke around in. Faboulous that you built it too. #great side posting with all the fire pics. #that must have been one scary day for you. #I live in Glendale CA and that was one bad week-fires everywhere in So Cal. #Glad to see you survived it. #i'm curious, coming that close to losing everything, do you do things differently today?

Zemper
Apr-09-2004, 2:55am
Question...

On avereage, how many man hours go into a mandolin produced in one of these home based or semi pro shops... again , #on average.....

Dru Lee Parsec
Apr-09-2004, 11:32am
i'm curious, coming that close to losing everything, do you do things differently today?
Well, when the fire was coming and we were evacuating our home I went into my shop, looked around, and broke down crying for a minute. Then I realized that things are about to get really really bad in the next few minutes or so and I had a family to protect so it's time to cowboy up and do what needs to get done. So I looked around the shop one more time and realized there was nothing there that I couldn't buy or build again. I left everthing behind, closed the door and just said "goodbye" to it all. We saved our art collection, tax papers, insurence papers, and mortgage papers, the animals (one cat, one bunny) and 2 of my 5 guitars and my mandolin. We took the computers because all our business records are on them. I think we had one change of clothes. By the time we were packing up the cars the police were driving through the streets telling us to get out NOW! BTW, the pictures that were taken during the fire were taken by friends who stayed behind. I'm glad they did, they saved our house with garden hoses and shovels. Next time I'm staying with my home.

What we did learn was that we had put some old brick pavers behind our fence. Everywhere that had that 2 foot brick boundary the fence didn't burn down. Every place where the brush was up against the fence the fence burned down and the fire came into people's yards and up to the houses. I'm going to take brush clearing much more seriously now. After the burn it was really obvious where the fuel path was and wasn't. In the photos at my web site you can see exactly where my fence didn't burn, but the next 2 houses lost their fences and the fire came much closer to their homes.

mandopete
Apr-09-2004, 12:10pm
Sort of puts things in perspective doesn't it? Glad to hear that things worked out okay!

oldwave maker
Apr-16-2004, 11:54am
4/16/04- adobe walls sheathed with 2" styrofoam, all dust and chip generating power tools are outside under the tin roof of the former garlic processing shed. used to curse the wind, now look forward to it! centerfold pinups courtesy of strad magazine.

John Jesseph
Apr-17-2004, 7:14pm
here goes...

John Jesseph
Apr-17-2004, 7:17pm
that last one is the disaster zone you step into when you enter my shop. here is what's on the bench right now...

Keith Newell
May-01-2004, 9:50pm
I dont have everything up or out yet but this is the main idea of my new place. Istill have stuff piled on the other side of it from moving...someday I'll get that put away.
Keith Newell
http://www.newellmandolins.com

Keith Newell
May-01-2004, 9:53pm
Coarse you probably wont see it ever this clean again.

Keith Newell
May-01-2004, 9:54pm
Another

Keith Newell
May-01-2004, 9:56pm
Last of 4 pictures.

Kent Barnes
Jun-29-2004, 8:47pm
All these pictures of these nice shops just makes me sick!
http://www.mandolincafe.net/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/biggrin.gif
Here's where I have to work.
http://www.kentium.net/mandolin/mando2pics/shop.jpg

WireBoy
Jun-30-2004, 2:01am
KB,thanks for keeping the thread alive

Jim Hilburn
Jun-30-2004, 6:59am
Hey, Kent, that makes me respect what your doing even more.
I got to check out KayBee's #1 at the Arlington Guitar show last year, and he did a great job, and to top it off, it sounded huge! A killer mandolin.

Bill James
Jun-30-2004, 9:00am
Hey mandolinkgn, is that a Gerstner?

mandough
Jun-30-2004, 1:44pm
Exactly what kind of sandwich was on that paper plate?http://www.mandolincafe.net/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/tounge.gif

Kent Barnes
Jun-30-2004, 2:20pm
That was a nice mixture of black epoxy (doing the inlay on the peg head)!! http://www.mandolincafe.net/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/tounge.gif

Keith Newell
Jun-30-2004, 6:29pm
Hey Bill. Yes it's a Gerstner. A WALNUT one not oak. I bought it new in for $383. The factory burned down or something a bit after that and I feel the boxes they made after that were never the same quality.
Keith Newell
http://www.newellmandolins.com

Bill James
Jul-01-2004, 6:40am
Sweet, I love Gerstners. I've also got a Walnut with the riser box that I purchased new in 1983. Can't remember the cost but at the time I was single so it didn't matter. http://www.mandolincafe.net/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif

I like your shop.

Rob Powell
Jul-01-2004, 9:40am
Hey Kent...

You've actually got more space than I do at the moment (sad but true) and it just goes to show you that having the space and all the fancy gadgets doesn't make the mando!

That's not to say that those who do aren't doing great work just that it isn't necessary to the final product.

My only question is: Does 10-30 produce a better tone than 10-40? http://www.mandolincafe.net/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/rock.gif

Rob

Damnation Gulch
Jul-04-2004, 8:59am
Everyone of you has a sweet shop, some VERY nice works in progress too!

Rob Grant
Jul-23-2004, 8:27am
The bars are to keep me in... hee, hee, hee.

grandmainger
Jul-23-2004, 8:30am
Rob,

That's a GORGEOUS back over there on the left! #What wood is it?

keithd
Jul-23-2004, 10:13am
Rob,

Great looking mandolin; could you say something about the bracing?

Thanks,

Keith

keithd
Jul-23-2004, 10:15am
Also, it seems like you've minimized the size of the scroll-area blocking, no? I'm not not a builder, just curious.

Keith

Tim Saxton
Jul-23-2004, 3:18pm
Rob,

The "TP" has me confused. http://www.mandolincafe.net/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/rock.gif

Tim

Jim Hilburn
Jul-23-2004, 3:50pm
It appears to be a hybrid X-tonebar. You can run it on gas or batteries.

keithd
Jul-23-2004, 4:54pm
Yeah, I've heard this referred to as "K" bracing. I think it's what Rigel uses, at least on some of their mandos...? Do other makers use this configuration? I'm curious if anyone could chime in on what it's properties are, like what having the tone bar on the treble side vs. the base side delivers....

Thanks,

Keith

Magnus Geijer
Jul-23-2004, 8:35pm
Had to move due to the wife getting a new job. Here's my mando-work area now. Progress seems slower than before the move, somehow.

/Magnus

Rob Grant
Jul-23-2004, 10:49pm
Jeeeze... didn't expect so much "action" from posting a pix of me humble work space!!!

The timber back shown is a rather "flash" bit of what's #called (North Queensland, Australia) "Queensland maple" or Flindersia brayleyana. This was cut locally from the butt of an old scrub (rainforest) tree. By the way, this is not a true maple or Acer. The early settlers gave names to the local timbers based on how they resembled woods in 'mudder England.

The bracing is an experiment. I've played around with tone bars without great success. X-bracing works for me, but I thought I might try combining the two. Still have to finish this sucker, but the tap tone sounds interesting. I'll try to post the results when it's finished. I'm not binding the back... just in case!<g>

Trying to make a real light mando (for a change) so I've cut out the excess where possible... hence the headblock.

By "T.P." Tim, I guess you're referring to the instrument tailpiece and not the Manray photo in the backround?<g>
The normal tail block is in position. I fabricate my own tailpieces from sheet stainless steel. The only thing I don't make are the tuners and strings. Poor dollar exchange rates are the "mother of invention and creation" around here.

Thanks for all the interest.

Rob, FarOutNorthQueensland,Oz.

Jim Hilburn
Jul-24-2004, 9:01am
I think he's referring to the toilet paper roller.

Rob Grant
Jul-24-2004, 4:12pm
Oh, that T.P....

1.)Quick, cheap way to wipe a bit of glue off the work when one hand is occupied holding down the project.

2.)Handy for blowing the wood dust out of your nose or wiping a watery eye from the same. (we've got some soft "dunny roll" here!<g>)

3.)Useful when things are going wrong and the project is really giving me the s....! <G>

Rob Powell
Jan-23-2005, 9:03am
Ain't fancy but here's a few of my shop and mando's in progress...

Glue up on a flat top...

Rob Powell
Jan-23-2005, 9:04am
Another of the glue up

Rob Powell
Jan-23-2005, 9:05am
General pic...wood stash I think...

Rob Powell
Jan-23-2005, 9:06am
General pic...

Rob Powell
Jan-23-2005, 9:07am
Last one...archtop in progress...been in progress fer a while http://www.mandolincafe.net/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/wink.gif

WireBoy
Jan-24-2005, 12:01am
Beergeek,
#thanks for keeping this thread alive. #nice little corner you carved out of your garage.

oldwave maker
Jan-24-2005, 8:38am
pic I sent to Ginny to use in upcoming Mando Mag artice- ol' wave luthier performing tonal adjustment on mandobanjo!

french guy
Jan-26-2005, 7:07am
Ol'wave , I have a b@£µjo to setup , can I contact you http://www.mandolincafe.net/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/rock.gif

Here is my mandolin maternity .

Steve Stahl
Feb-04-2005, 12:14pm
Beergeek,
#thanks for keeping this thread alive. #nice little corner you carved out of your garage.
I think Beergeek's shop is in his basement, just like mine, and right over on the other side of the Potomac. I am on the Yankee side. http://www.mandolincafe.net/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/sad.gif
Boy does that wall look ratty.

Steve Stahl
Feb-04-2005, 12:16pm
I keep the drill press on the floor in the corner, so that when I use the Wagner Safe-T-planer, it keeps the sawdust somewhat contained.

Steve Stahl
Feb-04-2005, 12:19pm
The contraption on the floor is a duplicarver that I am building. My tonewood stash is under the table.

Steve Stahl
Feb-04-2005, 12:20pm
The drawback of a basement workshop is the paucity of natural light. Just one little window well.

WireBoy
Feb-05-2005, 3:01pm
steve,
i like the wooden wine case lids as 'wall tile'!

brandon
Feb-05-2005, 3:07pm
killer thread!!http://www.mandolincafe.net/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif

OldSausage
Sep-25-2013, 9:49am
I think it's about time this thread got updated. I love looking at these.

Pete Jenner
Sep-25-2013, 10:58am
I think it's about time this thread got updated. I love looking at these.

Be careful what you wish for. I'll post a pic soon.

Oh and just so we are clear, here in Australia and in most of the rest of the English speaking world, a shop is a place to purchase goods. A workshop in a place where work is done.

Bill Snyder
Sep-25-2013, 8:12pm
Old Sausage if you are really interested there are multiple threads on just this topic. Most of them in the Builder Section.

Keith Newell
Sep-25-2013, 8:28pm
I would post a picture of my shop nowdays but you know the old saying of 10 lbs of S*** in a 5 lb sack.
Keith

Chuck D
Sep-25-2013, 8:35pm
107278
my workshop, where I'm building Tailgate Mandolin.

Max Girouard
Sep-25-2013, 9:08pm
Always changing and evolving, but here is how it stands at the moment.

OldSausage
Sep-25-2013, 10:13pm
Always changing and evolving, but here is how it stands at the moment.

Wonderful, Max, that's the spirit.

Pete Counter
Sep-27-2013, 3:26pm
4/16/04- adobe walls sheathed with 2" styrofoam, all dust and chip generating power tools are outside under the tin roof of the former garlic processing shed. used to curse the wind, now look forward to it! centerfold pinups courtesy of strad magazine.
Upper right corner, second one in, maybe in a darkish greenburst, Thanks Bill!

Doug Edwards
Sep-27-2013, 3:56pm
Here's my shop (http://hillcountrystringworks.com/shop.html) from 2009. I've added a lot more stuff since them and it's not as neat and clean.

107373

Walt Kuhlman
Sep-27-2013, 6:54pm
107380107381107382

Dale Ludewig
Sep-28-2013, 11:28am
Here's a few of this place. I do cabinetwork and furniture also. 107410107411107412107413107414107415

GarY Nava
Sep-28-2013, 11:31am
Hey Dale,
The word envy springs to mind!
Cheers Gary

Marty Jacobson
Sep-28-2013, 2:18pm
Here's what my shop looks like today. It's a comfortable, homey place to work. The only downside is that the wiring is from the 40's and there's only four circuits for the whole place, which can be a pain when the CNC machine is running. Maybe I'll post a picture of the combination laundry room, screened porch, and only bathroom later. Seriously, whoever thought a screen porch bathroom was a good idea was crazy.

107418107419
107420107421

CNC room (from a few months ago):
107422107423107425

AaronVW
Sep-28-2013, 3:23pm
Wow, I am impressed and a bit envious looking at some of these fine workspaces. I have visited Jim Hilburn to see his shop and also stopped in to meet Joeseph Campanella Cleary when I was in Vermont about a year ago. I can't really compare my building to either of theirs so I guess I shouldn't compare the workspace either. My workshop is a one-car detached garage that I can still park a car in most of the time. All my "big tools" are on rolling stands so they can be tucked away when out of use. I'll try to take a picture here soon when I take down my "spray booth" - a cardboard contraption incorporating a box fan on two construction tables. Fairly good results for a low budget job, though!

Dale Ludewig
Sep-28-2013, 6:18pm
Marty, that is a fine space!

Avi Ziv
Sep-28-2013, 9:51pm
Great space Marty and the picture of the young Jedi is just too much!

Walt Kuhlman
Sep-28-2013, 10:24pm
Some sweet shops, here is mine from the outside. Winter, summer and a couple more of the inside.

107429107430107431107432

Pasha Alden
Sep-29-2013, 11:19am
Cannot see the pictures without my husband describing them, but your shop sounds wonderful that is despite the wiring?

Steve-o
Sep-29-2013, 11:35am
Marty - That last picture of your boys is just precious, a real keeper for posterity. Cute kids. Future luthiers?

Marty Jacobson
Sep-29-2013, 11:43am
Steve, they might be. Or they might choose to make a living, instead. :-)
They love to piddle around in the shop, but I get a little nervous about their shenanigans when I have nearly-finished instruments all over the place. One little nick at the wrong stage is enough to set an instrument back a month, easily.

AaronVW
Sep-29-2013, 1:28pm
Gypsy, that is a great space! Marty, I think your workshop is as big as my whole house; I am impressed by the ability to have dedicated spaces for each step of the process. Here is a photo of my "workshop." Everything from start to finish happens in an area about 10x20, and I know that this is more space than some guys out there are using! 107449

OldSausage
Sep-29-2013, 6:30pm
I was looking forward to yours Aaron, and it does not disappoint. Do you have a sander of my kind? By the way, Marty's workshop actually IS a whole house.

AaronVW
Sep-29-2013, 6:49pm
Yes, I do have a belt/disc sander that is on the same stand as the drill press, mounted behind it. You can see the disc hiding there somewhere. It's just a small one but does OK. For thickness sanding I use a homemade jig and a sanding drum on the drill press.

OldSausage
Sep-29-2013, 6:53pm
Yes, I see it. Cool idea for thickness sanding. How about jointing?

Marty Jacobson
Sep-29-2013, 7:04pm
David, you seem to be seriously contemplating something foolish... c'mon, dive in. What's that savings account for, if you're not going to use it?
I can help you cut the inlay... I can see it now: "The Sausage". You won't build the best mandolin you've ever played the first time 'round, but it definitely won't be the wurst.

AaronVW
Sep-29-2013, 7:42pm
"but it definitely won't be the wurst." - :))
I use an old Stanley #6 plane and a shooting board for jointing. Marty has a top-notch pro setup but you could get into building without blowing the entire savings account. My entire workshop is full of hand-me-down tools or purchases from Craigslist. The nicest (and nearly most expensive) tool I own is a little Lie Nielsen 102 hand plane that the wife got me for my birthday. One thing that I always like about seeing other workshops it to see how many ways there are to do the same task and to see the creative solutions when one has to make do with what is available.

OldSausage
Sep-29-2013, 11:05pm
David, you seem to be seriously contemplating something foolish... c'mon, dive in. What's that savings account for, if you're not going to use it?
I can help you cut the inlay... I can see it now: "The Sausage". You won't build the best mandolin you've ever played the first time 'round, but it definitely won't be the wurst.

Hot dog, you got a sausage in a pun. Well, I'm thinking about it. It's not the equipment so much that makes me quake, as just the sheer number of different skills and processes I would have to get to grips with, from tool sharpening to wood finishing, to making sure I don't lose any fingers in the machinery. I start from a very low skill base (did someone say "ham-fisted sausage"?). But I suppose I may as well start now, I won't gain more time to build up the skills needed by waiting.

Marty Jacobson
Sep-29-2013, 11:11pm
We're in a good area, and there is a ton of equipment available for 1/2 or less of retail value. I got pretty much everything other than my drum sander and jointer for dirt cheap on Craig's List, or built it myself.
You're right, though, as the main hurtle is learning the processes so you can be effective and safe. But a few evenings of Highland Woodworking classes, and with some of the best practicing luthiers willing to give their advice here on the Cafe for free... it's the best time in history to start building.

OldSausage
Sep-29-2013, 11:16pm
"but it definitely won't be the wurst." - :))
I use an old Stanley #6 plane and a shooting board for jointing. Marty has a top-notch pro setup but you could get into building without blowing the entire savings account. My entire workshop is full of hand-me-down tools or purchases from Craigslist. The nicest (and nearly most expensive) tool I own is a little Lie Nielsen 102 hand plane that the wife got me for my birthday. One thing that I always like about seeing other workshops it to see how many ways there are to do the same task and to see the creative solutions when one has to make do with what is available.

Thanks Aaron, I've been following some of your adventures on here for a while, and have really been impressed by what you've been able to achieve in such a (relatively) short time.

Dale Ludewig
Sep-30-2013, 8:30am
Sander? This one doesn't have much application in luthiery but it can move a lot of material. No dust collector can keep up. My stroke sander. It's 8 feet between the columns.

107471

sunburst
Sep-30-2013, 8:50am
I don't even want to look at the picture of that stroke sander wearing loose fitting clothing! Yep, that's a dust machine alright...

Austin Clark
Sep-30-2013, 9:48am
Ok, ok. Here is the ten cent tour. A bit messy.....
Dust collector is in the "closet". (Really just a soundproofed box with a door). Finish work and drying instruments are in another area separate from the dust zone. The table saw makes a great table. I don't actually use it anymore.
Hand work is done mostly on the island and power tools are to the side near the dust collector.

herbsandspices
Sep-30-2013, 9:56am
Love the spider plant, Austin.

Your spring clamp tree is quite beautiful too... I have one just like it, but an orange variety. :grin:

Michael Bridges
Oct-01-2013, 5:07am
Some VERY nice shops out there! My hat is off to you builders, and the skills it takes to turn a pile of wood into something as beautiful as the mandolins I see on the cafe. David, would LOVE to see you give a go to building. Following you here, I have a healthy respect for your ideas, think you'd do well. BTW, I barely recognized Marty's shop without all that sweet smellin' sawdust around!
As for the pic of Marty's kids, the times I've been around them they are a great bunch of yunguns! Marty and Monica have taken on the hardest job in the world, and doing a bang-up job!

sunburst
Oct-01-2013, 5:54pm
Since this thread has once again surfaced, and I'm spending a lot of time working on my "new" shop these days, here's a little of what's going on.
Here's looking through the overhead garage door (Craigslist) at some of the insulation destined for above the ceiling.
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The same pile of insulation viewed through the front door (removed from a house).
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The finish room! A real one, or at least it will be when I'm done with it.
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Looking through the door (damaged, in the clearance bin at Lowes) at the explosion proof exhaust fan (auction, $5) illuminated by the explosion proof light fixture (a gift!).
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The electrical boxes. I ran out of breaker space, so I wired in a sub panel so I could keep going.
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Planning ahead, I put this removable panel in the wall so I can run more circuits above the suspended ceiling if I decide I need them later.
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And onward the construction goes...

sunburst
Oct-01-2013, 6:04pm
Oh, almost forgot.
Some outlets. I wanted to be sure I had plenty, so nearly every wall looks like this (except the finish room, and where the wood rack will go) If you're within 4 feet of a wall, you're within 4 feet of a four-way outlet, 6 circuits, All 20 amp. I think I'm up to 6 230V circuits now, ranging from 20 amp to 50 amp. I don't want to run into inadequacies in the electrical system!
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OldSausage
Oct-01-2013, 6:42pm
This is gonna be some workshop :)

Walt Kuhlman
Oct-01-2013, 8:07pm
Pretty nice John..are you beefing up your equipment?

sunburst
Oct-01-2013, 10:36pm
Beefing up? Not really, adding a few pieces. The "newest" is an old Crescent 12" jointer (Craigslist again). I'll be moving in a 36" wide thickness sander that will require 30A, 240 volt power, that sort of thing. Dedicated circuit for the compressor, 3 overhead light circuits... it starts to add up!

Marty Jacobson
Oct-01-2013, 11:24pm
It looks great, John. I look forward to seeing what you bring out of it.

Where's your photo studio going to be? :-)

Walt Kuhlman
Oct-01-2013, 11:41pm
The 12" Crescent is pretty heavy duty! What type of sander is your 36"? I ask because I spent about 10 years working in the industrial woodworking machinery industry. Even though I don't use any, (mine are small shop tools) I am curious how your outfitting your place.

sunburst
Oct-02-2013, 12:43am
Marty, I think the photos will happen in the "man cave" in the house. This shop doesn't have a loft like the shop I'm leaving, where the "studio" is now.

Gypsy, the sander doesn't actually belong to me, it's sort of community property that gets to live in my shop and about 3 of us will use occasionally. I'll have to look at it and see who made it. As for other large power tools, I have my "famous" Yates American 30" bandsaw, Unisaw (10"), Crouch spindle sander, assorted belt sanders and drill presses, Bridgewood planer (15"), the 12" Crescent jointer, and that's pretty much it, other than the sawmill, and it doesn't get to live in the shop!

tree
Oct-02-2013, 7:45am
Okay, John has sewed up my vote for coolest shop EVER.

Pete Jenner
Oct-04-2013, 5:52am
Getting a new ceiling and beefing up the lighting.

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OldSausage
Oct-04-2013, 11:58am
Wow, everyone's gearing up for the big time.

sunburst
Oct-04-2013, 1:39pm
What type of sander is your 36"?

So... I just looked at the sander. Maybe the small space it is in distorted my perspective, or maybe it's just my failing memory, but it is only a 24" sander, two drum, "Ultrasand". (That's kind of a relief, actually. Takes up less shop space, and 24" is wide enough for anything I can imagine a need to sand.)

StevenS
Oct-04-2013, 2:11pm
The important part --

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Steve

juneman
Oct-05-2013, 7:19pm
Here is a couple pics of the "JUNE " shop. 20x16 total area. two work areas,one a saw room with all the power tools I use. the other room I try to keep clean for setup work,assembly etc. 107692107693107694107695107696