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Antlurz
Sep-30-2005, 2:29am
I'm in the process of designing a non typical adjustable bridge for a current project, and got to thinking. (scarey if I'm home alone http://www.mandolincafe.net/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/tounge.gif )

Anyhow, I started looking around for an inspiration for a starting point to design from and realized there is no good way to search them out for ideas, yet from time to time, I've seen some pretty innovative designs. Why not a thread for photos of funky bridges?

Ron

Martin Jonas
Sep-30-2005, 4:11am
When it comes to off-beat bridges, it's difficult to beat Gelas. It's part of an utterly off-beat overall design, though, so replacing a normal bridge with one like these is out of the question.

Martin

Martin Jonas
Sep-30-2005, 4:13am
Here's a diagram showing how the Gelas bridge works with the overall double top layout (both pictures from here (http://www.crane.gr.jp/CRANE_ShowCase/GELAS/)).

Martin

phynie
Sep-30-2005, 10:50am
Dr Cohen's bridges are a slight detour from your standard Loar adjustable. And let me tell ya, they fatten up your tone far more than any standard bridge I have tried. I can't seem to get the pic to load, but here's a link.
http://users.erols.com/judcohen/2pt.html

John Flynn
Sep-30-2005, 10:55am
I think the bridge on my Old Wave is unique. It is made out of desert ironwood, which is denser and stronger than ebony. The bridge is thinner in all dimensions and I imagine the stronger wood makes that possible. It also is a single foot design, which is not the norm for adjustable bridges. I really like the sound.

John Flynn
Sep-30-2005, 10:58am
You get a better view at this link:
http://www.elderly.com/new_ins....ail.jpg (http://www.elderly.com/new_instruments/items/images/90N/OW23_front-detail.jpg)

LeonEvans
Oct-01-2005, 7:12am
Here's Steve Holst's take on the D'Aquisto Centura Bridge only for Mandolin.

Leon

LeonEvans
Oct-01-2005, 7:13am
Here's another shot of it.

Leon

LeonEvans
Oct-01-2005, 7:17am
The section on the right is a sliding wedge that the saddle rides on and can adjust the string height. The small dot in the center is a metal pin that keeps the saddle from moving latterally. Steve built both this one and a standard one with the thumb wheels for my C-5 and told me they sounded about the same. I like the looks of this bridge so much, I haven't tried the other one yet.

Leon

Ken
Oct-01-2005, 9:14am
I've used this style on my last two mandolins and have also replaced existing bridges on two other ones. On some mandolins I really like what it does to the tone, to my ear richer and woodier (is that a word?) On my current mandolin I'm planning on replacing the bone insert with ebony because overall the instrument is just too bright. It is adjustable by shimming under the insert, which isn't as easy because you have to take it off the mandolin to do it, but you can still make adjustments.

Bob DeVellis
Oct-01-2005, 9:56am
The old-style Sobell bridges are quite something. The ebony base has a kind of twist to it as a way of placing the saddle at the proper angle for compensation. The saddle just sits on the ebony pedestal, with nothing but string tension to hold it in place.

Bob DeVellis
Oct-01-2005, 10:02am
I had the original one replaced with one having a straight base, saddle with more familiar compensation "steps," and a slot routed in the pedestal to maintain saddle position. The height of these is as considerable as it looks in the pictures and is typical. This produces plenty of down-force, even with nice low action, and probably plays a significant part in the instrument's big voice.

Antlurz
Oct-01-2005, 1:57pm
More from the Crane site...

http://www.crane.gr.jp/CRANE_ShowCase/Guittar/CRANEguittar002.jpg