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Br1ck
Sep-08-2018, 8:09pm
Do you use a thinner pick when you play old ovals than on your more modern mandolins?

rcc56
Sep-08-2018, 11:03pm
I don't own any modern mandolins. That said, my most common mandolin pick is a Fender extra heavy in celluloid. If I want a brighter sound, I use a Dunlop Delrin 1.14. If I want it brighter yet, occasionally I'll use a Dunlop Delrin .96, but sometimes it might inhibit my technique because it's thinner.

Picks are individual to the player. One man's meat may be another's poison. And a pick that sounds good on one mandolin may not sound as good on another.

Go to your friendly neighborhood music store and buy $5 - $10 worth of different picks and see what suits you and your instruments.

Dave Hanson
Sep-09-2018, 1:39am
Simple answer to this question is to try out as many as you can until you find one you like, that's how most players do it.

Dave H

pheffernan
Sep-09-2018, 9:06am
Do you use a thinner pick when you play old ovals than on your more modern mandolins?

I tend to use a thinner pick on a more lightly strung mandolin, which my old oval is not. I have my last set of Sam Bush monels on my snakehead and play it with a 1.4 mm pick. My Poe flattop runs J62's, however, and as a result, I drop down to a 1.2 mm and sometimes even a 1.0 mm Wegen.

Jill McAuley
Sep-09-2018, 12:40pm
I actually used a slightly heavier pick when I had my '27 A-jr - it seemed to sound best with a 1.0mm pick so I used a 1.0mm Weber celluloid pick that I had laying around, or a Blue Chip TPR40. When I got my MTO I went back to using a Blue Chip TPR35 (.88mm).

Randi Gormley
Sep-09-2018, 5:07pm
My snake likes a thin but stiff pick with a point. it have a john pearse that sounds great with it -- it didn't particularly like the blue chip jazz pick -- which my Eastman likes. the mandolin itself will tell you what it likes -- so just try different picks and see what sound you like.

Eric Platt
Sep-10-2018, 4:35pm
I often use a Blue Chip TAD-1R 40. My mentor uses either Dunlop or Herco heavy nylon picks on his 1909 A. Another friend uses Tortex .88 on his A-2.

Am not totally satisfied with my Blue Chip on either oval or my octave mandolin. So still searching. Problem is, it's the pick that cuts through the best at a show.

jdchapman
Sep-10-2018, 5:02pm
I tend to use either a Golden Gate or a Dawg on my A-5. I've found oval holes like the rounded edge less. I've used a Wegen BG 140 on vintage Gibsons to good effect. (Depends on your playing, of course....)

Br1ck
Sep-11-2018, 11:54am
So far it seems to like a 1.2 Wegen dipper. I use 1.8s on my other mandolins.

Capt. E
Sep-11-2018, 1:09pm
I use a Bluechip TP 50 on my 1920 A-2

pops1
Sep-11-2018, 2:31pm
The heaviest pick I use is a 1mm Wegen, the old Gibson doesn't seem to care, and sounds good with most any pick. I usually use a Dunlop Pro pick at .76, but I mostly use the rounded corner and not the point.

Bob A
Sep-11-2018, 4:30pm
I have a hundred or so picks accumulated over the decades.When time hangs heavy upon me, I'll grab one of the mandolins and try to pick the pick that brings out the best. Every mando is different, and of course so is every player.

Pick the pick that sounds and plays best for you. Enjoy the process.

Be thankful that you're not looking for a violin bow.

Scott L
Sep-11-2018, 5:47pm
TPR 45 or 50 on my 1921 Gibson A-4. But I like these picks for guitar and my Pava F5 as well.

jimmy powells
Sep-11-2018, 6:11pm
Wegen 2mm guage works great on all mandolins including old Gibsons. I used it to great effect on a 1915 F4.

Br1ck
Sep-12-2018, 3:34pm
I have a hundred or so picks accumulated over the decades.When time hangs heavy upon me, I'll grab one of the mandolins and try to pick the pick that brings out the best. Every mando is different, and of course so is every player.

Pick the pick that sounds and plays best for you. Enjoy the process.

Be thankful that you're not looking for a violin bow.

I've been in and dropped serious coin in some of the SF Bay areas finest violin shops. I know of which you speak. When it's suggested that you spend 1/3 the cost of the $12,000 cello you just bought your daughter, it's a sobering experience. Went through it again with viola.

journeybear
Sep-12-2018, 3:50pm
I use a Dunlop 1.5 mm. It's got tiny raised dots on the broad side to improve grip. Must work because I've had it for four years. :disbelief: I picked it up while visiting the guitjo player from Old Crow, a friend of a friend. He goes through at least one every gig, even though they seem barely used to me. His table was littered with them. Should have grabbed a handful, a lifetime supply.

The spare in my case is a Dunlop 2mm. never use it, but it's there if I ever need it. I like a stiff pick with a bit of flex, and that's a bit too stiff. But it's a really pretty shade of purple. :cool:

Capt. E
Sep-24-2018, 11:56am
I can't help but think of Bill Monroe and his comment that he uses whatever pick is around. Wonder what he would think about spending $35 on a Bluechip. Whatever...I do like the 3 I own.

mandroid
Oct-04-2018, 1:54pm
346 triangle , in what Fender calls heavy, though I got some with CF Martin's imprint on it , too ,

Or Herco's thumb/flatpick..

Strings, 10-36 P Bronze.. on a Pre Truss rod Gibson A.


My BC is with the CF Mix.



..

pops1
Oct-04-2018, 1:59pm
While I usually like a heavier pick for most mandolins, my '22 or the past teens ovals that I have had don't seem to care and sound good with about any pick. Some sound better because of the material of the pick, not how heavy it is. I use a .71 on my A2 and it sounds great. I have used a heavier pick on occasion, but it really doesn't give me much better sound, the Gibson is warm and deep with most picks and since mine is not a tubby sounding mandolin, it just sounds great with most any pick.

jimmy powells
Oct-07-2018, 5:59pm
Do you use a thinner pick when you play old ovals than on your more modern mandolins?

Wegen picks for everything and that definitely includes teen Gibsons which can sound thin.

JimmyP
UK

Vernon Hughes
Oct-07-2018, 7:37pm
Fender extra heavies for the last 40 years or so on most everything and also one of those made out of a material that can't be mentioned. It sounds the best on my '22 A-2.

Mark Levesque
Oct-07-2018, 7:51pm
My 1917 A-4 does need a different pick than my other mandolins. This one sounds great on mine and balances the strings:
https://www.ebay.com/itm/Pickboy-Vintage-Pick-Tortoise-Shell-Cellulose-75mm-10-pack/292417264566?hash=item44156d5bb6:g:mVYAAOSwGUxazUV R:sc:USPSFirstClass!06066!US!-1

lenf12
Oct-28-2018, 9:25am
172201

I used to use one of these skinny little Pettine picks on my 1916 F-4. It sounds very precise due to the sharp point. Now I use a Dunlop Primetone 1.5. Tastes do change over time.

Len B.
Clearwater, FL

Mandoplumb
Oct-28-2018, 12:24pm
I think picks are more the picker than the instruments. I use a 1.5 or heavier, mostly heavier, but when my dad played my mandolin he would not use my pick, he used a very thin one. He got a good sound that I couldn't get with a thin pick.

slimt
Oct-28-2018, 4:23pm
172202

:)

Timbofood
Oct-28-2018, 4:34pm
When I first started playing my first Mandolin, Harmony, fifty dollar model, ( bought from a tympanist who was the top brass /woodwind repair guy in this part of the state no idea about fretted instruments, but, a very cool guy!) he suggested “Washburn Blues”! I never liked them, too thin and, well, just too thin. I started using Fender heavys! I knew nothing about set up either!
Then, I started working at the music store where acoustic instruments ruled the roost. At that point I graduated high school, and to a carved top Mandolin, I made some picks out of 1/8” plexiglass which made me understand the value of more stiffness for my desired feel and sound. The guy that owned was a very widely versed musician who subscribed to the Bill Bolick school of Mandolin style playing. That was born of the use of a now “unmentionable material” but, was closely mimicked by the afore mentioned “Wabash Blue”! Those were offered by the good folks from”C. Bruno & Co.” which still cracks me up.
But, as for a pick for a given age instrument!? I don’t see that correlation. Pick to genre, I get a lot more but, I suppose for a 1925 A-3 (Kelvinator White refrigerator finish)...

jaycat
Oct-28-2018, 5:29pm
When I first started playing my first Mandolin...

When I first started, I used a pick made from Mastodon teeth.

yankees1
Oct-28-2018, 7:11pm
I actually used a slightly heavier pick when I had my '27 A-jr - it seemed to sound best with a 1.0mm pick so I used a 1.0mm Weber celluloid pick that I had laying around, or a Blue Chip TPR40. When I got my MTO I went back to using a Blue Chip TPR35 (.88mm). I also recommend the BC TPR35 ! Great pick that I use mainly with my Girouard oval !

Br1ck
Oct-28-2018, 9:42pm
I've settled on one of my Wegen Dippers, a 1.2 that is my go to guitar pick. The 1.4 and 1.6 picks are usually on my mandolins. I could very well see a thinner BC working too. I have a TAD 60 now. It's a bit heavy for the A 1.

Next up is some Primetones next shop visit.

Br1ck
Oct-28-2018, 9:47pm
172202

:)

What a lovely patina on both pick and instrument.

G7MOF
Oct-29-2018, 6:42am
Use the one you feel most comfortable with.

Bob A
Nov-02-2018, 1:55pm
There have been a few posters here who have made picks from some less frequently used materials.

I still have a few picks made from deer antlers (too soft) and from recycled ivory piano keys (totally stiff, but nicely slick).

I'd think an ivory pick would go nicely with a Kelvinator-white A3, at least visually.

That said, I generally go with the pick that sounds best for the instrument I'm playing. Of course it varies player by player.

DScott2408
Nov-08-2018, 1:50pm
Hi guys - first time posting in this forum. For my teens Gibson, I prefer a Heavy pick and D'Addario light (J62) strings. I use a Blue Chip CT55 (a larger triangle with pretty sharp points - 1.4mm I think). It was expensive ($35 plus shipping and tax) but it works well. There is still a little click sound when hitting the strings though. I have used tried a lot of different picks - settled in on a heavy Fender large triangle, but now I like the BC better. I have a 1917 Gibson A - thus the light gauge strings - it's a beauty - looks and sound! I enjoy fiddle tunes - when I can remember the notes! - and bluegrass. - Dan