PDA

View Full Version : NonCountry Bluegrass suggestions?



Spock89
Jul-20-2017, 9:49am
Hi everyone. I am looking for some good bluegrass bands. I am having a bit of trouble though.. I despise country music... I hate that signature whine/half yodel all country vocalist do to sound like each other, I hate that signature country fiddle and/or dobro/lapsteel sound that immediately lets you know you're in for some tractor ridin, #### kickin, cry in your beer fun lol.. no offense to any country fans.. I personally just do not like that type of music.. not near enough variety for me. It seems a lot of bluegrass tends to have a lot in common with country. But there are those that have their own sound and its amazing.

I love bluegrass guitar, banjo, mandolin, cello/bass... I love the fast pickin pure acoustic sound. Obviously, I'm looking for good bluegrass bands that dont have much in common with country. So far I really like The Dead South, some Greensky Bluegrass("Burn Them" is my fave from them), Mumford and Sons(probably more indie than bluegrass), some Punch Brothers/Chris Thile... what do you guys/gals suggest?

Maybe I'm confused and bluegrass isnt even the right genre for me?

Thanks.

Josh Levine
Jul-20-2017, 10:09am
:popcorn:

chidave
Jul-20-2017, 10:32am
Ever listen to Trampled by Turtles or Yonder Mtn String Band?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g0sgKnDiDOk

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ERjlLEHlltQ

Bill McCall
Jul-20-2017, 10:32am
When you mention some bluegrass bands, maybe we can talk.:whistling:

skiboy1
Jul-20-2017, 10:52am
Trampled by Turtles is a favorite of mine! Brothers Comatose, Infamous Stringdusters, Cabinet to name a couple of others.

Ky Slim
Jul-20-2017, 11:21am
Soooo..... Twang ain't your thang??

2 words: Pandora Radio

Josh Levine
Jul-20-2017, 11:40am
I'm going to help you out a little here.

When many people refer to "Bluegrass" they refer to the music that it was named after, specifically Bill Monroe and the Bluegrass Boys.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tiRu03RgSWw

Yes, it is hillbilly music, twangy, stuff from the hills. It can be an acquired taste. But, it is the root of many of the music you listed or atleast part of it.

Now, much music has derived from Bill Monroe. There are now several sub genres that bluegrass purists would not consider bluegrass because it does not follow the format Bill Monroe (and predecessors Flatt and Scruggs, Stanley Brothers, Jimmy Martin, etc) laid out.

You have Jamgrass (Greensky, Stringdusters, Yonder)

You have NewGrass (Sam Bush)

You have Americana music that features some of the same instruments as bluegrass (Trampled by Turtles, Mumford, Cabinet)

You have bluegrass influenced string quintets (Punch Bros) - I'm not really sure what to call them as they are just as much Bach as bluegrass.

So, in conclusion, if you ask a bluegrass purist for bluegrass music that does not sound like hillbilly music, it is like asking for an orange that isn't orange, since at its root this music is hillbilly music. You may be looking for a sub genre of music that bluegrass has influenced or something that is loosely defined as bluegrass by a non purist.

PS. The idea of plugging the bands into Pandora that you like and seeing what it kicks out is a great idea.

JeffD
Jul-20-2017, 12:26pm
no offense to any country fans.. I personally just do not like that type of music.. not near enough variety for me. It seems a lot of bluegrass tends to have a lot in common with country. .

I understand. It can be for some an acquired taste, and not everyone acquires it.

Many, (like me) find it very compelling. It sort of like the blues - progressions and themes we have heard a million times, but I have to hear it to the end!

I am thinking you are liking the line up of traditional bluegrass acoustic instruments, but playing music that has departed some, or a lot, or completely, from bluegrass music itself.

Spock89
Jul-20-2017, 12:42pm
I'm going to help you out a little here.

Thanks, this is actually helpful. However you misunderstood me... I dont have a problem with "hillbilly", if anything thats something I find refreshing about it. Hell, Duelling Banjos was one of the first songs I learned on guitar lol. Its country that I do not like. To me there is a big difference between country and hillbilly. Take almost every country song ever, they all have a few things in common... twanged singing, country violin/fiddle, & country dobro/lapsteel. As soon as you hear any one of those things you immediately know the song belongs to country and no other genre. I also dont care for most lyrics that come with country... "She Thinks my Tractor's Sexy", "Honky Tonk Badonkadonk", "Boot Scoot and Boogie".... 90% the songs you'd hear playing in a diner/cafe in Texas or Oklahoma.. lol


But I am new to the genre(or whichever genre I'm chasing after, Americana maybe?) and maybe its conflicting to say you want bluegrass without country? I grew up on rock and blues, 2 bands/artist in either genre can sound nothing alike, share literally none of the same qualities, sound style, lyrical themes, culture, style of singing, or anything, but they still belong to the same genre.. take Beatles, Pink Floyd, & Jimi Hendrix as an example ... same era, same genre, wildly different bands/artists in every other way. So with that in mind, tossing anyone that kind of sounds bluegrass in with all bluegrass is kind of an easy mistake for someone like myself to make.

JeffD
Jul-20-2017, 12:47pm
Well your given examples are, in the eyes of many country music aficionados, examples of pretty dismal country music. So even within country music (as you are seeing with bluegrass) there is a wide range of stuff, some of which you might find you like. :mandosmiley:

Spock89
Jul-20-2017, 12:54pm
I understand. It can be for some an acquired taste, and not everyone acquires it.

Many, (like me) find it very compelling. It sort of like the blues - progressions and themes we have heard a million times, but I have to hear it to the end!

I am thinking you are liking the line up of traditional bluegrass acoustic instruments, but playing music that has departed some, or a lot, or completely, from bluegrass music itself.
Definitely, you're correct... I absolutely love the bluegrass instrument lineup as well as the flawless fast picking style that is found in bluegrass. The impossibly fast banjo rolls, smooth and blazing fast mandolin and guitar scale progressions.. cello/bass throwing some mood in.. yea.. man, way too much skill and talent in it not to love.

wildpikr
Jul-20-2017, 2:50pm
There's a group called Iron Horse...maybe check them out...a bluegrass band doing tributes to Metallica, Ozzy, rock music...

Josh Levine
Jul-20-2017, 2:56pm
Thanks, this is actually helpful. However you misunderstood me... I dont have a problem with "hillbilly", if anything thats something I find refreshing about it. Hell, Duelling Banjos was one of the first songs I learned on guitar lol. Its country that I do not like. To me there is a big difference between country and hillbilly. Take almost every country song ever, they all have a few things in common... twanged singing, country violin/fiddle, & country dobro/lapsteel. As soon as you hear any one of those things you immediately know the song belongs to country and no other genre. I also dont care for most lyrics that come with country... "She Thinks my Tractor's Sexy", "Honky Tonk Badonkadonk", "Boot Scoot and Boogie".... 90% the songs you'd hear playing in a diner/cafe in Texas or Oklahoma.. lol



I'm not sure if you are just trolling or what, but it sounds like you are listening to modern pop country music, not bluegrass music. Granted high harmonies, fiddle and dobro are all part of bluegrass, I would love for you to point me to bluegrass singing about trucks and badonkadonks. You obviously like some of what you are talking about as Greensky features dobro on lead constantly. So I guess if you look for actual bluegrass or subgenres you should be fine? Just don't listen to country music.

dwc
Jul-20-2017, 3:36pm
Part of the problem here is semantics. I think what you are looking for is acoustic string music. Bluegrass is acoustic string music, but not all acoustic string music is bluegrass. There are bands that exist on the periphery of bluegrass that while not everyone can agree as to whether or not they are bluegrass, they are undeniably acoustic string bands. The first band that came to mind was Nickel Creek, Chris Thile's old band. Della Mae is another. I would also put The Tony Rice Unit and David Grisman's many contributions to acoustic string music in this category. What all of these bands have in common is their focus on string instruments.

Warren H
Jul-20-2017, 4:24pm
i'm looking for some jazz that's not so darned jazzy.

Denny Gies
Jul-20-2017, 4:29pm
Spock89. You want good Americana check out Jason Isbell. Great song writer and guitar player. Warning.....you could get hooked.

Kevin Stueve
Jul-20-2017, 5:49pm
"She Thinks my Tractor's Sexy", "Honky Tonk Badonkadonk", "Boot Scoot and Boogie".... 90% the songs you'd hear playing in a diner/cafe in Texas or Oklahoma.. lol

That ain't country. Please go listen to Waylon, Willie, Merle. .... Or don't

Kevin Stueve
Jul-20-2017, 5:51pm
Can some one point me to some blues but not that 8bar or 12 bar blues scale crap.

JL277z
Jul-20-2017, 8:05pm
Can some one point me to some blues but not that 8bar or 12 bar blues scale crap.

Maybe. :) Old stuff though, dunno about modern. Some contenders, although I didn't transcribe the notes to see if they're "12 bar blues scale crap" but I'd hazard a guess the notes are a little different from the usual:


Oh Death (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KIYNoH99Guc), performed by Doc Boggs. Yes the words go back hundreds of years before the invention of modern "blues" per se, but the vibe and overall mood of despair etc certainly fit the genre.


Mississippi Heavy Water Blues (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zzIcDJ6J2x4), performed by Roscoe Holcomb (caution: *high* voice and old bad recording quality with probably no EQ or whatever, recommend keeping your hand on the volume control just in case you need to turn it down). This track is included on the Classic Appalachian Blues from Smithsonian Folkways (https://www.amazon.com/Classic-Appalachian-Blues-Smithsonian-Folkways/dp/B0031Y4A6W) album.


Dark Was The Night, Cold Was The Ground (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p-4jTbrLtUk), performed by Blind Willie Johnson.


Now, back to the topic of bluegrass...


... I am looking for some good bluegrass bands. ... hate that signature whine/half yodel... I love bluegrass guitar, banjo, mandolin, cello/bass... I love the fast pickin pure acoustic sound. ...

What about instrumental bluegrass tunes? Instead of songs where the emphasis is on singing. I've always loved this Lester Flatt & Earl Scruggs album "Foggy Mountain Banjo" - 12 great instrumental bluegrass tunes[1] :mandosmiley: on this video:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AJT-ovum3wU
(or direct link (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AJT-ovum3wU))

I don't know if any modern bands are doing instrumental bluegrass stuff though.

I suppose vocal stuff (songs with words) bring in more income, compared to instrumentals, at least from the non-musician general public who seems to need lyrics to latch onto in order to appreciate the music. (Never understood that myself, but whatever.)


Edited to add:
Hm, just found this, a 1976 Rounder Records album featuring Jack Tottle on mandolin, "Back Road Mandolin", plenty of instrumental stuff:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QDRhJ8ALnq0
(or direct link (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QDRhJ8ALnq0))
(Saw somewhere else where that album was described as "progressive bluegrass", no clue if that's right though. Shows what I know, I didn't even know there was a progressive bluegrass genre.)

___
Footnote:

1. About that Earl Scruggs album, a better description would probably be "traditional tunes played in a bluegrass style". Or something like that. :)

allenhopkins
Jul-20-2017, 9:47pm
There are so many "citybilly" bluegrass bands from the '70's-'90's that meet OP's criteria, I could spend an hour listing them. Non-nasal vocals -- because the singers were from Connecticut or Southern Cal, not Kaintuck -- non-standard arrangements, songs that sounded like folk or folk-rock or jazz or whatever. Try some of these (many LP's available in their entirety on You Tube):

Country Cooking
Skyline (with Tony Trischka)
New Deal String Band
Buffalo Gals
New Grass Revival
Tasty Licks
Whetstone Run
Bottle Hill
Salamander Crossing
City Limits (Lynn Morris banjo)


I'll just link one example: Cloud Valley's first album, A Bluegrass Ensemble:

Cornelius Morris
Jul-20-2017, 10:39pm
I never lose an opportunity to praise Jack Tottle's amazing Back Road Mandolin, and it reminds me that it's time for my annual note to Rounder Records pleading, begging, demanding that they release this on CD--paired with his (and Bela Fleck's) Tasty Licks record Anchored to the Shore. Best fluid, liquid, slithery mandolin you will find anywhere (even cross-picking), wonderful vocals, and great songs, many written by Tottle. Totally exciting; totally tasteful. After learning from Jack's Oak Publications Mandolin book, I wore out this LP trying to copy everything. And then I personally met Frank Wakefield (whom I had learned about from Jack's book). I started at the top.

Rounder: Please. Please.

Spock89
Jul-21-2017, 4:24am
Can some one point me to some blues but not that 8bar or 12 bar blues scale crap.


i'm looking for some jazz that's not so darned jazzy.

So just to clarify, you guys are saying that bluegrass and country are one in the same? Or maybe you're saying something like: just add a banjo to a country song and you have bluegrass? Cause thats honestly the only difference I hear in a lot of them.

Idk... I know I'm new to the genre but it seems to me the world of music is usually a little more versatile than that.

Spock89
Jul-21-2017, 4:38am
That ain't country. Please go listen to Waylon, Willie, Merle. .... Or don't

Err.. I live in Tulsa, Oklahoma.. I've heard all of them more than I care to admit lol. Yes they are a different type of country. Still not my thing though.

Closest to old school country I like is Johnny Cash. And even then I'm pretty picky and only really like his darker more, bluesy/rock type stuff... "Folsom Prison", "Gods Gonna Cut You Down", "The Man Comes Around", his cover of "Hurt", etc..

Charlieshafer
Jul-21-2017, 5:36am
Well, for the non-bluegrassy styles, since you mentioned the Punch Brothers, try one of the early innovators in the non-trad area and listen to some Crooked Still.There are two periods there, the rougher first two cd's with Rushed Eggleston on cello, and the later more elegant and thought-out pieces with Tristan Clarridge on cello a and Britt Haas on fiddle. There's also the currently-touring Mr. Sun, and then going back in time again, early Mammals.

Spock89
Jul-21-2017, 5:51am
I'm not sure if you are just trolling or what, but it sounds like you are listening to modern pop country music, not bluegrass music. Granted high harmonies, fiddle and dobro are all part of bluegrass, I would love for you to point me to bluegrass singing about trucks and badonkadonks. You obviously like some of what you are talking about as Greensky features dobro on lead constantly. So I guess if you look for actual bluegrass or subgenres you should be fine? Just don't listen to country music.

No, not trolling at all. You just misunderstood me again. I'm not listening to modern country pop and thinking its bluegrass lol. I was just trying to explain what I dont like in a lot of the bluegrass I have found. As well as hinting at the cultural difference between "hillbilly" and country. I'm aware badonkadonks, trucks, and tractors are a country thing and not bluegrass. I was more or less saying to take that type of country.. or really any country. How about a Garth Brooks or George Strait song.. . compare that song with a lot of bluegrass songs, and mentally deconstruct or change the bluegrass song.. take away or change anything that makes the two songs sound like they might be in the same realm of music. The things you'll be removing or changing are the dobro, violin, and vocal stylings. You'll be left with all acoustic fast picking awesomeness, completely void of any hints at honky tonkin, hat tippin, or square dancing. Thats the sound I'm searching for. If that means its not bluegrass anymore then I guess its not bluegrass I'm looking for lol. Check out The Dead South, Poor Mans Poison, (some not all)Old Crow Medicine Show, (Some)Split Lip Rayfield, etc..


Yes I know Greensky Bluegrass has a lot of country style dobro lead. Which is why I said I like some(not all) of their stuff. Some of their stuff doesnt have much dobro at all.. Listen to "Burn Them".. and some of their stuff has a strong dobro presence but its pretty far from country style.. check out "Demons" from them to see what I mean.

I dont have a problem with the inclusion of a dobro or violin.. either instrument is a tool that can be used to play J.S. Bach or they can used to play that Honky Tonkin square dancin stuff. Lol.. its how they are played that matters.

Dagger Gordon
Jul-21-2017, 6:03am
I think it's actually a good question.

I have found that I enjoy stuff which is more on the fringes of bluegrass and indeed country.
Indeed I prefer it to be a bit more 'alternative' in terms of attitude as well.

Going back over thirty years ago, I was honeymooning in the States (my wife is American but I am Scottish) and we bumped into a lot of great music at that time, particularly around North Carolina where we ran into some good pickers in a great shop called Oxbow in Chapel Hill, and bought a bunch of LP records.

These included Tony Rice Unit's Backwaters (featuring Reischman on mandolin), Grisman's Quintet 80, Mark O'Connor's guitar album Markology, Doc and Merle Watson's Guitar Album, etc. I still think that was probably a great time for music, and you would do well to check some of it out.

More recently I find I enjoy a lot of Tim O'Brien's stuff, both solo and in a duo with Darrell Scott.

This is a great video - Live at Hippie Jack's. Actually the hippy aspect of it is something which I find attractive, but I can see that more traditional country or bluegrass fans would perhaps find it very off-putting.
https://youtu.be/30RQG9-6A1Y

I think you might also like Elephant Revival.

http://www.elephantrevival.com/

Spock89
Jul-21-2017, 6:35am
I think it's actually a good question.



Thanks! Elephant Revival is awesome! I'll be a while checking them out. I especially like the womans voice.. like a wonderful mixture of Jewel and Dolores O'Riorden(Cranberries) just excellent! Probably gonna be at the top of my playlist for a while lol.

I actually came across a Tim O'brien song a couple nights ago, liked the sound, and went on to something else and forgot his name lol. So thanks for the reminder.

Big thanks to everyone else as well.. trying to take time to check everything out you've all suggested so far. Taking some time get through it all but you guys have turned me on to some excelllent stuff! Flatt and Scruggs are killer, love Trampled by Turtles, and lots of others. Keep 'em comin

Victor Daniel
Jul-21-2017, 7:59am
This is one of my favorite bluegrass instrumental albums. Another is Richard Greene the Grass is Greener and for a bit newer Noam Pikelny Plays Kenny Baker Plays Bill Monroe. I too dislike many modern bluegrass bands that sound too "pop country", over rehearsed and lacking a bluesey or old time edge, but I also really enjoy many classic country artists. Some music seems to have soul and feel alive to me regardless of genre and some seems formulaic and dead.

A 4
Jul-21-2017, 9:38am
It's a pretty hard question to answer, since so many of the terms mean different things to different people. But I think we are talking about American acoustic music that doesn't have badonkadonk elements. I had to look that up, but i get it now. Here are some from bands I have seen locally (they were travelling)

I'm going to see the Infamous Stringdusters tonight. Yes dobro, but not steel guitar, which might be the OP's actual problem. I probably wouldn't call them bluegrass, but they are in that acoustic jam band sort of genre of which several examples were listed above. But there are lots. Not my fave genre to listen to, but the Stringdusters are great live. For more what people would classify as bluegrass, the Steep Canyon Rangers or Chatham County Line - neither have the annoying "I'm more country than you" swagger. Saw the Barefoot Movement a couple of years ago - I wouldn't call them bluegrass, but they were great.

Since we are leaving bluegrass behind, fiddler Brittany Haas' album is great:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2KEubV9ZWX0&list=PL0c-ZCyQlCU3nr443mtp5VSXOm6Ea3wZf
Beautiful renditions of oldtime tunes.

This is the mandolin cafe, so I have to suggest Joe Walsh, and also Matt Flinner, who is a bit more jazzy. Darol Anger on fiddle too. There is so much, once you find your way in.

Mandobart
Jul-21-2017, 7:46pm
To me, there is Bluegrass (Bill Monroe, Flat and Scruggs, Del McCoury), Newgrass (Sam Bush, Tim O'Brien, David Grisman, Old and In the Way), Stringband (Fruition, Yonder Mntn, Milkdrive, Elephant Revival), Classic Country (Johnny Cash, Merle Haggard, Marty Robbins, George Jones), Americana (John Prine, Jason Isbel, Townes Van Zandt, Robert Earl Keen, Ozark Mnt Daredevils, Devil Makes Three, Shovels and Rope) and finally Pop Kountry (everything by Garth Brooks and later played on commercial CW format stations). I enjoy everything but the last category.

Ivan Kelsall
Jul-22-2017, 1:09am
From Spock89 - "...you guys are saying that bluegrass and country are one in the same ?". IMHO,i think we need a touch of clarification here.

Back in the early days of Bluegrass music,the other ''Country'' singers that were around came in many guises. Some were straight forward balladeers who came into 'Country' via Tin Pan Alley's 'popular' music ie. Vernon Dalhart who kicked off by singing Opera for one thing. We also had Roy Acuff & a whole slew of singers singing what would become known as ''Country & Western'' songs. My personal favourite of that era,was Hank Williams. I think that the 'Westren' bit came via the 'Cowboy Balladeers' such as Roy Rodgers & his predecessors.

Flash forward a few years & ''Country & Western'' (& Bluegrass music) would be tinged by the most popular music of the time, ''Rock 'n Roll''. That's when we get the line up of electric guitars & drums etc. coming into the music. Until that time,the ''majority'' of 'Country Music' had been acoustic. I used to enjoy some of the 'Country & Western' (C & W) bands of that era,provided that the songs were good. Some of the singers at that time crossed over into what i'd call Country ballad style - Charlie Rich / Jim Reeves /
Statler Brothers etc. & were more akin to the 'pop' music singers,in fact there wasn't much difference IMO. Even in the UK with a vast non-country orientated audience,these singers had some big hits,especially ''Gentleman'' Jm Reeves.

Johnny Cash was big over here as well. Roger Miller had hits with his own type of songs,but everything was getting less & less C & W & eventually IMHO (again), it got lost in a flood of 'pseudo Country' music with the likes of garth Brooks & a few others. No disrespect to those singers,but i couldn't call their songs 'Country' songs - others will think differently.

Personally,i think that back in the early days of Bluegrass music,we had the 2 genres - Bluegrass & Country ie Roy Acuff & others. I think that in the Garth Brooks et al era,the genre of ''Country Music'' became somewhat blurred re. was being accepted as 'Country Music',but now,Bluegrass Music is seen as being 'Country Music' - ie. music derived directly from 'Country roots', & 'possibly' the purest form of Country Music at that.

Many of the bands playing today that use what we term 'Bluegrass instruments' in their music,began playing either Bluegrass or something very close to it,but have then gone on to play in their own style ie. 'Infamous Stringdusters' & 'Greensky Bluegrass' ( 2 of my own favourites - i like 'Demons' by Greensky ). Chris Thile's band Punch Brothers, play what the heck they like & it seems to go down well with their audiences. But to get to the root of the original question, Bluegrass is now widely seen to be Country Music,but in it's purest form. When you go back to the songs / tunes that Bill Monroe (& other bands) based Bluegrass music on,being perfectly honest - what else could it be ?. It didn't come from any 'city' that's for sure !. So strictly speaking, 'non-Country Bluegrass' doesn't exist.

The bottom line in all of this, is that you listen to music & choose the genres / styles that appeal to you & pass on the ones that don't - like the vast majority of us, including me,
Ivan:mandosmiley:;)

Dagger Gordon
Jul-22-2017, 4:41am
and lacking a bluesey or old time edge]

Exactly. If you listen to Monroe, those are important aspects of his music and that's a big part of why I like him so much.
It's also a bit rough round the edges. His singing wouldn't be released like that nowadays. It would be 'tidied up' in the studio.

DataNick
Jul-22-2017, 4:59am
Genre labeling has blurred lines these days. Strictly speaking, Bluegrass is a sub-genre of Country music. The Pandora reference is a good one for identifying other bands that play music you like...the label Bluegrass really encompasses just about all varieties of acoustic string band music these days...Enjoy your listening journey!

Seter
Jul-22-2017, 7:55am
To me Country music is a descendant of bluegrass; it has many other ancestors as well. Country music is a massively diverse and fuzzily defined genre, and even the artists themselves release music in diverse genres. A number of country artists like Alison Krauss, Dolly Parton, etc have released bluegrass-oriented albums and acknowledge the bluegrass heritage of the genre.

UsuallyPickin
Jul-22-2017, 8:50am
That's kind of like non wet water suggestions . . . . . luck. R/

Mark Wilson
Jul-22-2017, 9:10am
I've heard a few hard driving bands that use BG instruments and technique that are not BG. Most of them have been kinda cool to listen too. The Brothers Comatose comes to mind. It's a niche genre that has a following of folks that may or may not like trad BG. Op seems to prefer it and made an effort to ask for examples.

Ivan Kelsall
Jul-22-2017, 9:48am
Purely my own opinion,but in the genre of 'pure' coutry music,Bluegrass was a ''relatively'' late comer. We had what we now call 'Old Timey' bands & a lot of what they played touched on the music that Bill Monroe eventually put together as Bluegrass music. BM's Uncle Pen was a Country musician,but he surely wasn't a Bluegrass musician,& they were many,many more like him. You only have to read almost anything written by Neil Rosenberg to discover the wealth of 'Country music' that pre-dated Bluegrass.

One of my personal favourite Old Timey musicians is Tommy Jarrell,an absolute gold nugget of a guy. Then we have musicians like Charlie Poole,Bascomb Lunsford & dozens of others who contributed to the overall richness of 'Country Music' pre-Bluegrass. Uncle Dave Macon may be amongst the most well known.

It's pretty well known that much of the music of the rural areas where settlers 'settled',came from England / Scotland / Ireland &
other countries - but the music took root in rural Appalachia & other rural areas & literally was Country music - it couldn't be anything else. Being 'really' pedantic about it,until Earl Scruggs joined Bill Monroe along with Lester Flatt,even Bill Monroe's music was ''pre-Bluegrass'' (proper). It was only when radio listeners began writing into radio stations asking for ''more of the 'Bluegrass'' (style) music'', that Bluegrass music actually took on it's name. Earl's banjo playing made Bluegrass as popular as it became. BM had been around for many years & never achieved the popularity that Earl (& Lester) gave him,
Ivan

https://youtu.be/iWloyRafeNM

Marcus CA
Jul-23-2017, 12:35pm
How about John Reischman and the Jaybirds? Check out their Vintage and Unique album, if you haven't already. Also, Frank Solivan and Dirty Kitchen.

J.Albert
Jul-23-2017, 4:41pm
OP wrote:
"Maybe I'm confused and bluegrass isnt even the right genre for me?"

I'd think that's a fair assumption... ;)

Timbofood
Jul-27-2017, 5:20pm
Sorry guys, been under the Bridge (Mackinaw) with lousy connectivity options except at the nice little brewery "Biere De Mac"
Sorry, side tracked.
I'm kind of surprised (from the quick scan of the thread) that no one had offered up JD Crowe and the New South, or much of the classic guys, have I been living in a vacuum? What about the Country gentlemen?
Joe Val?
These threads with "non country" headers make me wonder about what brought the posters to bluegrass music. I have known "Greensky" since they was pups, what they do is far and away different from the style I have played for 45 years, all the best to that strain of the music but, "Blue"? No, I don't think so.
But, living under the bridge, I'm just a troll?

Beanzy
Jul-27-2017, 5:42pm
Worth checking out the Ozark Mountain Daredevils too (Different more rock take on country)

https://m.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8A8g_1j55v-qbfaEUb32MIFsC_v6Giqy

Willie Poole
Jul-28-2017, 11:35am
I spent quite a bit of time reading these posts and it seems to me that the OP doesn`t know what bluegrass really is...He is looking for songs that border on rock and roll and jazz that are being played with instruments that normally make up a bluegrass band, sadly there are way too many of those types of bands being booked on bluegrass festivals that a lot of people tend to forget what traditional bluegrass really is...I am not knocking his decision to play and like any kind of music, it`s just that what he is asking isn`t to me connected to bluegrass at all...Sure a lot of the people playing that style of music are great pickers and they prefer to play for an audience that will support them and their music, nothing wrong with that....I have posted on here many times that I wish someone would come up with a good description and name for that kind of music, Americana has been suggested but a lot of posters don`t agree with that either...

I say just keep looking and listening to as much music as you can and if you have access to a satellite radio you most likely will hear bands that you will fall in love with on what they call Bluegrass....I believe the dobro was first introduced into bluegrass when Flatt and Scruggs used one when Earl was in an accident around 1953 or so and Josh Graves filled the void of no banjo, Earl wasn`t gone for very long and they decided to keep the dobro in the band after he returned...

Willie