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Beanzy
Jun-05-2016, 10:58am
Apparently my new mandolin is complete.
147002

Two point, single piece maple back
147003
Two piece swiss pine front (from viola blanks)
147009

3mm Carbon fibre seam front to back through the length of the neck, dressed with an ebony strip then carved.
147004
Single piece flamed maple sides from point to point.
Gunstock oil finish.

Waverley tuners satin silver with ebony buttons, and a matching James tailpiece with no endpin hole.
147005
147007
147010
32mm nut with courses offset to the bass side to fit my chubby fingers.

Not seen it in the flesh yet. Can't wait.

Tavy
Jun-05-2016, 11:49am
Looks sweet! I shall expect a video when you have it in hand ;)

Jill McAuley
Jun-05-2016, 11:56am
What a looker! Congratulations!

Jim Garber
Jun-05-2016, 2:17pm
Very nice. Congratulations, Eoin! Just curious, tho, will those tuners work in reverse since they seem to be installed opposite from what they would have on a standard F-style headstock?

Beanzy
Jun-05-2016, 2:50pm
Yes they will Jim. We could have popped the tuning shafts out and swapped them top to bottom, but that would have left the spindles higher and either further up the headstock, looking unbalanced. If I went for a longer headstock it could have been made central again, but I wanted to minimise the mass at the headstock on this one & keep the slightly stubby look to it. So I decided to leave them be & go for the reverse action instead.

Jim Garber
Jun-05-2016, 6:11pm
I suppose you can get used to that. Did you work with Mr. Davidson (I assume Phil?) on the design?

So, it looks like the headstock is 180 turned from this one (wider on the bottom than the top).

147021

choctaw61
Jun-05-2016, 6:21pm
Wow! That's a beauty Eoin.I love those two point mandolins.I like everything about it. Please let us have a listen to it 1st chance U get.

Ivan Kelsall
Jun-06-2016, 2:05am
Phil's a good friend of mine & his building is as good as it gets. The tuners working in 'reverse' shouldn't pose any problem. My Lebeda mandolin has 'reverse' Schallers on it & it simply takes getting used to.
This is a beautiful example of Phil's work. The build standard looks as impeccable as ever & the colour is wonderfully 'antiqued'. It also has my favourite fingerboard inlay as well. Incidentally,it's Phil's wife,Fiona who designs & does the inlay work - a very lovely mandolin indeed !!,
Ivan

Beanzy
Jun-06-2016, 3:05am
I suppose you can get used to that. Did you work with Mr. Davidson (I assume Phil?) on the design?

So, it looks like the headstock is 180 turned from this one (wider on the bottom than the top).

Yes I outlined what I needed in terms of wanting a mandolin for my particular situation and he guided me very expertly.
For example I wanted the lightest stiffest neck I could get, minimising the top heavy feel of so many mandolins I have used & tested.
Phil likes a good hunk of mass in the headstock, but was willing to work outside his normal preferences as long as the integrity & sound of the mandolin was not compromised. I asked for no trussrod, suggested carbon fibre stiffeners, but Phil went away and had a think. He suggested we take a method often used in banjo necks, but make it even stiffer. You often get banjo necks made from sandwiched layers of wood with ebony or other hardwood centre splices. In this case we went for a 3mm carbonfibre centre splice which would be stiff enough on its own then it was matched with the flamed maple blocks either side. This gave a super solution and a lovely light neck with an ebony trim hiding the carbonfibre and saving on trying to finesse the sawn fibre ends for a finish. As it was gunstock oil it would have jarred to have a resin or varnish type finish there.

The bass side biasing of the courses was his solution to my problem of muting the lower e string when playing with my index finger curled tightly. That produces a roll of skin that can catch the lowest string and buzz or sometimes give bizarre harmonics or semi dead notes.

The main criteria of the headstock was to mimise the mass at a distance from the body, as I play without a strap. By using the reversed template for his normal headstock he got the hunk of wood he likes there for the longer scale instruments but we moved it nearer the body.

The sides are a continuous strip of flame-maple from point to point; purely for aesthetics, with a James tailpiece comissioned with no end-pin hole as there'll never be a strap on it.

Tonally it was specced to work with light to medium strings (specifically DR Rare mediums) but would take a set of J74 or 75 as the structure would hold the poundage no problem.

What I was aiming for here was a mandolin that would break down the physical barriers I have been encountering with my efforts to play duo-style, chord melody and jazz playing.

I went for no fretboard markers as I should only look down in practicing so the side dots are enough. Otherwise it's high time I took the stabilisers of the bike.

As Ivan says Fiona custom makes the inlays to order. The fleur deLys/ compass head design below Phils PD logo is one I did for our trio ESP3 and references the fact that I'm always moving from place to place, going to the other side of the country for my music.

It'll be a couple of weeks before I get the beauty in my fat fingers, but I'll be up to my eyeballs providing the music for a theatre play so it'll be into July before I could get a sound clip up.

Skip Kelley
Jun-06-2016, 5:28am
Eoin, that is a fine looking mandolin! Congratulations! I really like the peghead shape; that's just cool!

derbex
Jun-06-2016, 5:52am
Very nice, I particularly like the headstock.

Jim Garber
Jun-06-2016, 6:31am
The bass side biasing of the courses was his solution to my problem of muting the lower e string when playing with my index finger curled tightly. That produces a roll of skin that can catch the lowest string and buzz or sometimes give bizarre harmonics or semi dead notes.

I understand that you have a wider neck, but I read the above quote a few times and I am not sure what happens. You have a problem fretting both e strings? I could not see the "bass side biasing" in the pictures above. It just looks like the outer string pairs are spaced away from the outer edges of the fretboard.

In any case, it is a beautiful mandolin and I am looking forward to hearing more about it when you take possession.

Beanzy
Jun-06-2016, 7:23am
The courses are offset towards the bass side so the finger roll that forms between the index finder and the hand makes contact with the treble side neck edge rather than the lowest e string.