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Martin Jonas
Mar-19-2005, 7:51pm
For the past few days, I've been playing around with one of the tunes from the Co-Mando TablEdit archive, with the title "Branzoli 13". Other than that name, and the fact that it's a nice and relatively easy tune that's fun to play, I know nothing about it, or the composer. Google gives me a bit more about Branzoli, namely that he wrote several mandolin methods, plublished 1882, 1901 and 1911 (or one method reprinted at these dates), and some separate etudes for the mandolin, but that doesn't identify this piece. It feels like an etude, so it may well come from his intructional material.

Is anybody else familiar with this piece? The TablEdit file has no dynamic marks, other than that all 1/4 and 1/2 notes should be tremoloed, but it feels like some accents and dynamic changes were probably intended by the composer. Are there any markings in other editions?

Martin

Jim Garber
Mar-19-2005, 9:40pm
I have posted a rather extensive bio of Sr. Branzoli here (http://www.classicalmandolin.net/mandoarticles/bone_branzoli.pdf) in pdf. It is from my 1972 edition of Bone's The Guitar and Mandolin.

I have not figured out what that piece is from. I have a number of Branzoli pieces from the Nakano site but this is not one of those, not can I find it in my Branzoli Method book dated 1899. It may jus6 be an etude from another

Jim

Eugene
Mar-20-2005, 4:55pm
Not having TablEdit, I haven't looked, but it must be the 13th study from some edition of the Branzoli method. Is this the one that Mair referenced in her little tremolo article in mandolin magazine?

Martin Jonas
Mar-20-2005, 6:32pm
Thanks Jim and Eugene. No, it isn't the piece referenced in the Mair article. I saw that one as well, but haven't tried it yet. The Mair piece is here (http://www.mandolinmagazine.com/workshops/mair/mairfall99.pdf) and is called "Esercizio No. 39". It's a duet for two mandolins whereas No. 13 is a solo piece. The level of difficulty of the two seems broadly comparable.

I note that the pdf published by Mair does have dynamic markings.

Martin

Fred Keller
Mar-21-2005, 10:32pm
Hey folks!

Wendy Anthony gave me a heads up that there were questions about this piece. I transcribed it as a self-prescribed penance for some provoking chatter on Co-Mando, IIRC.

The title of the book is "A Theoretical And Practical Method For The Mandolin Consisting of One Hundred And Twenty-Five Progressive Lessons." I guess they had more time to read titles back in 1892, the date the book was published by The Oliver Ditson Company. The author, of course, is Giuseppe Branzoli, "late of the Royal Academy of St. Cecila, In Rome."

The title of the piece, "Branzoli 13," is my name for it because it's the the 13th exercise in the book.

I apologize that I don't have extensive background in classical notation and dynamics. I see that the piece says "moderato" and that the section this exercise is from contains the following header:

"The following rule should be observed in playing the following notes...For the half-note strike the stirngs four times; for the quarter-notes, twice; for the eighth-notes, sixteenth-notes, etc., strike once.

the longer the note, or the greater the duration of tone on any given note, the more strokes must be given to the strings producing that tone. Hence, we strike as above indicated, but allowing no more length or duration to the note or tone, than its character and the tempo of the measure or bar require. After a pause, when there is no given plectrum-sign, always begin with a downward stroke."

There you have it and I hope it helps. Let me know if you have any more questions.

Fred

Jim Garber
Mar-21-2005, 11:03pm
The title of the book is "A Theoretical And Practical Method For The Mandolin Consisting of One Hundred And Twenty-Five Progressive Lessons." #I guess they had more time to read titles back in 1892, the date the book was published by The Oliver Ditson Company. #The author, of course, is Giuseppe Branzoli, "late of the Royal Academy of St. Cecila, In Rome."

The title of the piece, "Branzoli 13," is my name for it because it's the the 13th exercise in the book.
Fred:
Ah! Now I figured out the mystery. In 7 years Sr. Branzoli added a few more lessons. My Branzoli book is titled the same but dated 1899 and subtitled "containing 161 Progressive Lessons." Your lesson 13 is numbered 24 in my book.

Jim

Martin Jonas
Mar-22-2005, 4:47am
"The following rule should be observed in playing the following notes...For the half-note strike the stirngs four times; for the quarter-notes, twice; for the eighth-notes, sixteenth-notes, etc., strike once.

the longer the note, or the greater the duration of tone on any given note, the more strokes must be given to the strings producing that tone. Hence, we strike as above indicated, but allowing no more length or duration to the note or tone, than its character and the tempo of the measure or bar require. After a pause, when there is no given plectrum-sign, always begin with a downward stroke."
Thanks, Fred -- that's very helpful, if only so that I can now ignore the composer's instructions...

I've been playing it with tremolo on the 1/2 and 1/4 notes and suspect that this gives a more musical effect than the intended subdivision into individual eighths. Presumably, this way of playing is intended in the relatively early stages of the book to help teach a sense of timing before the individual strokes are elided into tremolo a few lessons down the line. The Alberto tutor does the same for the etudes preceding the introduction of tremolo.

Martin