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Carlo Aonzo & Elena Buttiero - Il Mandolino Italiano nel Settecento

By Mandolin Cafe
November 11, 2008 - 7:00 am

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Carlo Aonzo & Elena Buttiero - Il Mandolino Italiano nel Settecento

Carlo Aonzo & Elena Buttiero - Il Mandolino Italiano nel Settecento

Il Mandolino Italiano nel Settecento (The Italian Mandolin in the Eighteenth Century) is a new recording by Carlo Aonzo (mandolin) and Elena Buttiero (spinet) inspired by the success of a recent tour and concerts throughout Italy.

Selections on the recording represent some of the most important eighteenth-century music for mandolin and spinet and traces the fortunes of the mandolin in Italy as well as in Europe during the period in which it was becoming popular as a concert instrument. It affirms the importance of this very Italian instrument in music history.

The repertoire in this album comes from a period that was particularly fertile in the history of the mandolin, the quintessential Italian instrument. The selections include pieces from the first half of the eighteenth century, in which Lombard and Roman mandolins were used, and from the second half of the century when the Neapolitan mandolin was first introduced.

During the eighteenth century, the mandolin was popular in all major European cities, including Milan, Bologna, Florence, Paris, Leone, London, Prague and Vienna. Introduced by itinerant Italian musicians, it immediately garnered the public’s favor. Among the various types of mandolins, we may add to the list above the Cremonese and the Genovese.

In the second half of the century, the Neapolitan mandolin came into being as a fusion of elements from several existing instruments. The tuning was based on that of the violin, while the bowl-shaped sound box was already a feature of other mandolin varieties. The headstock, the movable bridge, and curved face were features of various types of guitars of the period.

The Neapolitan mandolin did not originate as a folk instrument, but rather as a concert instrument. It also became popular in the musical training of young aristocrats and was widely played among the nobility.

The elegant inlays of surviving instruments from that period, the evidence we have from art of the period, and the variety of original compositions all prove that the mandolin was a court instrument and, above all, a concert instrument.

Selections:
Sonata X in F Major op.5: I. Preludio
Sonata X in F Major op.5: II. Allemanda
Sonata X in F Major op.5: III. Sarabanda
Sonata X in F Major op.5: IV. Gavotta
Sonata X in F Major op.5: V. Giga
Sinfonia per la Mandola in D Minor: I. Allegro
Sinfonia per la Mandola in D Minor: II. Largo
Sinfonia per la Mandola in D Minor: III. Giga
Sinfonia per la Mandola in D Minor: IV. Minuet
Sonata in re maggiore: I. Largo
Sonata in re maggiore: II. Allegro
Sonata in re maggiore: III. Andantino alla Francese
Sonata in re maggiore: IV. Gavotta
Sonata in re maggiore: V. Fugato
Sonata K 89 in D Minor: I. Allegro
Sonata K 89 in D Minor: II. Grave
Sonata K 89 in D Minor: III. Allegro
Sonata in sol maggiore: I. Allegro
Sonata in sol maggiore: II. Andantino
Sonata in sol maggiore: III. Tempo di minuetto
Sonata in re maggiore: I. Allegro
Sonata in re maggiore: II. Largo Amoroso
Sonata in re maggiore: III. Taice alla Tedesca

Additional informaiton:
Released: October, 2008
Label: Devega
Genre: Italian classical
Purchase: From amazon.com
Carlo Aonzo
Carlo Aonzo MySpace

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