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ASAP Irish Mandolin: Learn How to Play the Irish Way

By Mandolin Cafe
May 2, 2014 - 8:30 am

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ASAP Irish Mandolin: Learn How to Play the Irish Way

ASAP Irish Mandolin: Learn How to Play the Irish Way

ASAP Irish Mandolin: Learn How to Play the Irish Way is a new project from Centerstream Publishing authored by Doc Rossi.

Rossi created this book for mandolin players who want to improve their technique, develop ideas and learn new repertoire. Starting with the basics of ornamentation in traditional Irish music, the book goes directly into the tunes, in tablature and standard notation.

Right-hand and left-hand techniques, ornamentation and other topics are taught through the tunes themselves. The book includes a CD with audio of all 35 tunes and ornaments from the book. The book is also suitable for tenor banjo, octave mandolin, or any other instrument tuned in fifths.

Contents

Polkas

Hornpipes

Jigs

Reels

Additional information

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Reader Comments

Adam Sweet
May 02, 2014 05:12 PM
What's the Irish Way?
Eddie Sheehy
May 03, 2014 01:25 PM
Listen to Marla Fibish...
DougC
May 03, 2014 05:42 PM
"The Irish way" uses a strong backbeat, (in reels and polkas), and uses ornaments like mordents or rolls, and double stops that sound like bagpipe drones, triplets with a 'lilt' or accent on the first note. And more.
ollaimh
May 03, 2014 10:41 PM
lots of hammer ons and pull offs as well, you get more notes than you actually pick. and of course the lilt. the lilt is everything.
Kevin Stevens
May 04, 2014 07:44 PM
Temporarily out of stock at Amazon.
Adam Sweet
May 05, 2014 08:25 AM
The best Celtic mandolinist I know personally is Claudine Langille

[video=youtube;_Fy7t7UdCTQ]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Fy7t7UdCTQ[/video]
yogiZ
May 08, 2014 10:27 AM
Watch this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T6eVkEzNMqg
neil argonaut
May 09, 2014 08:26 AM
Quote from ollaimh: lots of hammer ons and pull offs as well, you get more notes than you actually pick. and of course the lilt. the lilt is everything. End Quote

Don't know about that, as far as I was aware in ITM it was more common to pick each note when in bluegrass for example the same thing might be played with hammer on / pull off
DougC
May 09, 2014 03:08 PM
I just got the book and CD. It has TAB, regular notation and chords. The book has a number of common tunes, I suppose it is so the student can concentrate on ornamenting the tune instead of spending time learning the basic melody.

The one thing that to me seems to stand out from other books is that he tells you not only what kind of ornaments are available to the player, but where to place them in a tune. On the CD he plays it 'as written' and then ornamented in different ways. VERY USEFUL.

There are many 'tricks' as I call them. Triplets, grace notes, double stops and yes hammer-on's and pull-off's to make double grace notes and rolls. Often a number of ornaments are included in playing a tune given the situation like a dotted quarter note for example. One could apply a roll or a triplet or even a double grace note.

Marla Fibish says we have to look to the fiddle for guidance in creating a certain sound that is a style made up on fiddles and pipes. Mandolin is new to the scene.

This book really gives the 'one trick pony' more tricks. Money well spent in my opinion.
Pete Jenner
May 12, 2014 03:23 PM
I have no idea who Doc Rossi (doesn't sound Irish) is but I ordered the book anyway.
Petrus
May 17, 2014 12:01 AM
Don't forget the necessary lubrication. smile

Bertram Henze
May 17, 2014 01:17 AM
Quote from Petrus: Don't forget the necessary lubrication. smile End Quote

There's more to that - much of the "Irish Way" resembles timing and coordination of a drunken man: the elegance of someone almost falling over but not quite. Fretting a note almost too late but just in time, playing the B part a little different the next time round... There has to be an exact pulse behind it all, but it must. not. be. audible. in any single instrument (not even and least of all in the bodhran, btw.) In other words, no army should be able to march to that without bursting out laughing.
DougC
May 18, 2014 08:31 AM
Petrus and Bertram must be experts on the subject. ;)
Petrus
May 18, 2014 09:42 PM
I'm not a big beer drinker, but when I do drink beer (if I were in Ireland anyway) it'd be Guiness or Harp or something like that, or else a nice Irish whiskey. And I know enough not to ask for a black & tan! :disbelief:
Gelsenbury
May 19, 2014 06:01 PM
Quote from Bertram Henze: There's more to that - much of the "Irish Way" resembles timing and coordination of a drunken man: the elegance of someone almost falling over but not quite. End Quote

The Jig of Slurs springs to mind.
Pete Jenner
June 06, 2014 02:30 PM
No wonder it was cheap but it does the job.
neil argonaut
June 07, 2014 04:53 AM
Don't mean to be overly pedantic, but the jig of slurs is Scottish I'm sure.
Not that there's not plenty of drunken players here too!
crisscross
July 11, 2014 06:51 AM
To me the book is a bit of a disappointment. For a book with the subtitle "Learn how to play the Irish way" the tutorial aspect is clearly missing. It's a mere collection of tunes with a general introduction on how to execute them. In this introduction Rossi states, that ornaments are improvised and thus not notated in the sheet music. Well, jazz solos are also improvised, nonetheless there are hundreds of transscriptions of improvised jazz solos, so students can learn by emulating them. I'd like to learn Irish ornamentaion that way. Collections of celtic tunes in fifths tunes are all over the net. For those interested in playing the celtic way, I recommend "The celtic mandolin" by Simon Mayor. It has a lot more detailed explanations on ornaments.
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